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Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 393

post #5881 of 16802

It's fairly flat from the bass to midrange, but the mid highs are emphasized a bit.

post #5882 of 16802
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bola 7 View Post

 

About the SM2 and the SM3, which of two do have higher dynamic range?


About the same. The two Earsonics IEMs I've tried are very similar in many ways.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bola 7 View Post

 

 
Other doubt: is the Unique Melody Miracle so dynamic as the Monster Miles Davis Tribute or the Radius TWF21?


In my opinion, yes. It can really belt it out when necessary but can also be remarkably docile.

post #5883 of 16802

IjokerI, does RE262 have better mids than E-Q5? Which phone do you like most for vocals?

post #5884 of 16802

I changed my mind. I'm going for the 1964-Q.

post #5885 of 16802
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by olear View Post

IjokerI, does RE262 have better mids than E-Q5? Which phone do you like most for vocals?

 

I prefer the e-Q5 in general but if you're into warm and relaxed the RE262 is the better choice. Wouldn't say one is better than the other - the e-Q5 is brighter and more transparent while the RE262 is a bit thicker and more mid-focused.

post #5886 of 16802

How would you compare the Atrio Mg7, Yamaha EPH-100, and Vsonic GR07s in terms of overall bass performance, and their instrument separation/imaging/detail ability?

post #5887 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post


 

 

I prefer the e-Q5 in general but if you're into warm and relaxed the RE262 is the better choice. Wouldn't say one is better than the other - the e-Q5 is brighter and more transparent while the RE262 is a bit thicker and more mid-focused.


Thank you IjokerI

 

post #5888 of 16802
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tseliottt View Post

How would you compare the Atrio Mg7, Yamaha EPH-100, and Vsonic GR07s in terms of overall bass performance, and their instrument separation/imaging/detail ability?



I've never heard the EPH-100. The MG7 has more bass (much more sub-bass) than the GR07 but the GR07 is quicker and tighter. I would say the GR07 wins out in detail and separation, though not by much. Neither has great imaging.

post #5889 of 16802

joker, which would you prefer to listen to for rock, 60's music and general pop: EX1000 or FXT90?


Edited by olear - 2/7/12 at 6:36pm
post #5890 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post


 



I've never heard the EPH-100. The MG7 has more bass (much more sub-bass) than the GR07 but the GR07 is quicker and tighter. I would say the GR07 wins out in detail and separation, though not by much. Neither has great imaging.



Thanks a lot! I'm probably going to get the Atrio's then. I was under the assumption that the GR07 were absolutely superior in separation and imaging.

post #5891 of 16802
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by olear View Post

joker, which would you prefer to listen to for rock, 60's music and general pop: EX1000 or FXT90?



I generally prefer the EX1000 (or even EX600) so I'm the wrong person to ask.

post #5892 of 16802

One reason due to the Sony's being brighter?

post #5893 of 16802

Joker, please review the Panasonic RP-HJE120. I think this may be the best IEM under $10. Any chance we could get a Sony XBA-1 review soon?

post #5894 of 16802
Thread Starter 

Added the Sony MDR-EX300LP and MDR-EX600

 

Quote:
(3A65) Sony MDR-EX300LP

Sony MDR-EX300 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Feb 2012

Details: One of Sony's original vertical in-ear monitors
Current Price: $55 from amazon.com (MSRP: $89.95)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 105 dB | Freq: 4-28k Hz | Cable: 3.9' L-plug j-cord
Nozzle Size: 4mm | Preferred tips: Sony Hybrids (stock)
Wear Style: Straight down

Accessories (3.5/5) - Single-flange Sony Hybrid silicone tips (3 sizes), cable winder, and hard-shell carrying case
Build Quality (3/5) - The plastic housings of the EX300 seem well-constructed but the cabling is a major letdown - while soft and well-relieved, the thin j-cord is tangle-prone and inspires little confidence
Isolation (2.5/5) - Mediocre at best due to shallow-insertion form factor
Microphonics (4.5/5) - The soft, flexible j-cord and shallow seal keep cable noise to a minimum
Comfort (3.5/5) - The EX300 is a vertical-driver earphone with a straight nozzle. The housings fit partly into the outer ear and tend to protrude less than those of the pricier EX600 model but are also less secure due to the lack of a memory wire section on the cable. Those with smaller outer ears may find the driver bulge to interfere with the fit

Sound (6.8/10) - The sound of the MDR-EX300 is a compromise between Sony's popular consumer and audiophile signatures but falls closer to the higher-end EX600 and EX1000 than entry-level sets such as the EX85 and the XB series. The bass of the EX300 is enhanced but not overblown. It is punchy but not quite as powerful s that of the Soundmagic E10. Extension is decent enough but the mid-bass hump causes the entire low end to sound bloated and boomy compared to the pricier EX600. The Sonys sound fuller than some of the more analytical sets such as the HiFiMan RE0 and Etymotic MC5 but it's not as thick-sounding as a Dunu Trident or Beyerdynamic DTX 101 iE.

The midrange of the EX300 is warm but clear. Detail is decent enough and the mids sound open and airy. Naturally, the pricier EX600 is much more neutral, clear, and detailed, making the EX300 sound boomy and unrefined, but for a midrange earphone the clarity of the EX300 is more than reasonable. The Soundmagic E10 is a bit clearer and more crisp, giving guitars a bit more bite and making vocals sound a touch more intelligible, but lacks the balance and liquidity of the EX300 and doesn't quite have as big a soundstage.

Towards the top of the midrange, the EX300 picks up some emphasis and with it a bit of sibilance on tracks prone to it. The E10 is a little more forgiving but both earphones have moderate treble sparkle, slightly laid-back upper treble, and mediocre extension at the top. The presentation of the EX300 is wide and well-layered. Though the MDR-EX600 is significantly more spacious still, the EX300 is one of the more open-sounding entry-level earphones. Soundstage depth could be better and the imaging and dynamics lag far behind the EX600 but both are more than reasonable for the asking price. Clearly the EX300 was one of the better earphones in its price category upon release back in 2008.

Value (7.5/10) - The Sony MDR-EX300 impresses with its punchy bass, warm and liquid mids, and spacious presentation, especially considering the age of the earphones. What betrays them is the overall usability, mediocre isolation, and hit-or-miss form factor. The biggest gripe, however, is the thin and frustrating j-cord used by the earphones. For pure sound quality, the EX300 is an easy set to recommend but much of the modern competition simply offers a better value proposition on the whole.

Pros: Punchy, clear, and open sound; almost no cable noise
Cons: J-corded; very thin & tangle-prone cable

 

 

 

Quote:
(1B14) Sony MDR-EX600

Sony MDR-EX600 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Feb 2012

Details: Sony's mid-range dynamic-driver monitor
Current Price: $131 from beachaudio.com (MSRP: $199.99)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 32Ω | Sens: 107 dB | Freq: 4-28k Hz | Cable: 4' L-plug
Nozzle Size: 4mm | Preferred tips: Sony Hybrids, generic bi-flanges
Wear Style: Over-the-ear

Accessories (4/5) - Sony Hybrid silicone tips (6 sizes), Hybrid silicone+foam tips (3 sizes), and carrying case
Build Quality (4.5/5) - Though not made out of magnesium like those of the EX1000, the housings of the EX600 share the vertical-driver design and still feel just as sturdy. The detachable cable is held in place by a threaded bit and I still found myself unscrewing the connectors a bit each time I took the earphones off. The cord itself is very flexible but not particularly thick. The "memory wire" section doesn't hold its shape well. The termination is a slim 3.5mm L-plug
Isolation (3/5) - The nozzles of the EX1000 seem rather long but the earphones are not well-designed for deep insertion. Isolation is mediocre with the standard Hybrid eartips and very slightly better with the supplied foam-stuffed tips. Wind noise can be an additional issue when used outside
Microphonics (5/5) - The native wear style is over-the-ear and cord noise nonexistent in the soft cable
Comfort (4/5) - Though housings designed around vertically-positioned drivers often feature angled nozzles or other ergonomic improvements, the EX600 is actually a straight-barrel earphone. It is quite large and tends to protrude farther than most earphones when worn, looking a bit like the ridiculous PFR-V1. On the upside, the long nozzles position the driver far enough away from the ear not to cause discomfort. The fit is not as secure as with most other high-end monitors but the soft memory wire works well enough in conjunction with the cable cinch

Sound (9/10) – The MDR-EX600 closely resembles Sony’s dynamic-driver flagship, the EX1000, not only in design but also sound. As with the EX1000, the low end of the EX600 is accurate and controlled. It sounds clean and detailed, but not at the expense of note thickness. Rather, the bass is smooth and lacks the aggression of something like the JVC HA-FX500, which easily offers more depth and weight but loses out to the EX600 in control and accuracy. The similarly-priced VSonic GR07 is a little quicker and flatter in response, with better bass depth but similar punch, while the EX600 is more dynamic and at times presents a touch more bass power, though neither leans heavily on lower frequencies. Similarly, the EX600 itself loses just a bit of depth, resolution, and control compared to the pricier EX1000 model.

The midrange of the EX600 is neutral-to-bright, with a slight gain in emphasis towards the lower treble. Bass-midrange balance is good - the EX600 doesn’t share the warmth of an FX500 or Sennheiser IE7. There is no bass bleed, just clear and detailed mids. Like the EX1000, the EX600 is very smooth and liquid in presentation – more so than the GR07, T15, or FX500. The slight treble tilt also tends to create an illusion of better clarity compared to sets such as the warmer, darker FX500. However, next to more resolving earphones - the HiFiMan RE272, for example - it is noticeable that the EX600 lacks a bit of microdetail and overall refinement.

The top end of the EX600 is emphasized, but controlled. As with the EX1000, the EX600’s treble tends to be a bit sharper than that of the VSonic GR07 but still manages to remain refined and reasonably forgiving. On some tracks the EX600 does exaggerate sibilance a bit compared to the GR07 (or even JVC FX500), but those are few and far between. There is no grain or harshness and no sacrifices made in crispness or resolution. Best of all, the treble energy that is often lacking with consumer-friendly dynamic-driver sets is conveyed realistically. Top end extension is not quite a match for an RE272’s but keeps up with the GR07 and other similarly-priced sets.

The presentation, too, mimics the EX1000 closely – the EX600 sounds just as spacious and open as the flagship. Dynamics are excellent and both sets tend to sound rather effortless. Soundstage width is impressive and there is not a hint of the confined, closed-in feel prevalent among stage monitors. The similarly-priced VSonic GR07 also feels wide and spacious but gives up a bit of air, as well as some depth and imaging prowess to the EX600. The EX600 also has a wider soundstage and better layering than the JVC FX500. The VSonics and JVCs do provide a slightly more 3-dimensional presentation compared to the heightened left-right separation of the Sonys, making all three sets are very impressive in their price bracket. Those looking for a wider, more headphone-like presentation compared to the more typical in-the-head feel of an IEM should be especially impressed with the EX600.

Value (9/10) – A much more reasonably priced alternative to Sony’s flagship MDR-EX1000, the EX600 is a perfect look into the law of diminishing returns. At about 1/3 the price, the EX600 delivers all of the flagship’s functionality and most of the sound quality, easily competing with the very best earphones in its category. The sound signatures of the two Sony sets are remarkably similar - clean, quick, airy, and dynamic – and the same isolation and wind noise caveats apply to both. Those willing to embrace the design will discover the EX600 to have one of the best price/performance ratios in its class.

Pros: No cable noise; clear, detailed, open, and spacious sound
Cons: Average isolation; fit can be frustrating; wind noise can be an issue


Huge thanks to Inks for loaning me the EX600 for review

 

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by olear View Post

One reason due to the Sony's being brighter?


If you're looking for my personal opinion, I really like the bass-midrange balance, the clarity, and the out-of-the head presentation (which is quite refreshing) of the EX600/EX1000. The treble emphasis I could take or leave.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JK1 View Post

Joker, please review the Panasonic RP-HJE120. I think this may be the best IEM under $10. Any chance we could get a Sony XBA-1 review soon?


Sorry, pretty busy with all of the sets already in the queue.

post #5895 of 16802

Excellent EX600 review pretty much spot on, excellent value since the GR07 became a bit pricier. When will we ever see the TF10 review? :)

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