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Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 312

post #4666 of 16802

void


Edited by bmeat - 8/15/14 at 11:23am
post #4667 of 16802

Having a dedicated woofer also doesn't  always mean more bass than usual. I wouldn't worry about the drivers or how many are used and just read reviews or ask joker. 

post #4668 of 16802

The point of multiple drivers should be in rendering more complex and fast music more cleanly, clearly and precisely.  Good theory if you tune the phone and crossover to perform properly, bad theory if you don't which is often the case w/ most multi BAs and especially more common triples.

post #4669 of 16802

void


Edited by bmeat - 8/15/14 at 11:23am
post #4670 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmeat View Post

anyone heard the apple in ear and know if it sounds better than a superfi4 a151 or pl50? i would like it to have a good soundstage better depth and sound and as close to a moving coil as possible, just more low end basically the synthesizer drops just dont sound the same :'( but i love how they show the instruments so much more like under a razor very easy to hear instrument sepeartion and where they are coming from thats what i want a ba 


Nope, ADDIEM doesn't have a good soundstage / depth.

 

post #4671 of 16802

Joker, have I ever told you how awesome you are? biggrin.gif

 

Edit: Same with you Inks, your pretty awesome as well.

post #4672 of 16802
Thread Starter 

Added Brainwavz Beta & Section 8 Earbuds. Also updated the downloadable rating chart, thanks to carfentanil.

 

 

Quote:
(3B30) Brainwavz Beta

Beta Brainwavz v2 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Nov 2011

Details: half in-ear earphone with a good price/performance ratio
Current Price: $29 from amazon.com (MSRP: $28.50)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 110 dB | Freq: 20-20k Hz | Cable: 3.9’ I-plug
Nozzle Size: 5mm | Preferred tips: stock Comply foams, generic bi-flanges
Wear Style: Straight down

Accessories (1.5/5) – Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes) and comply foam tips
Build Quality (3/5) – The construction of the Beta is similar to Sony IEMs of yesteryear, with plastic housings and long strain reliefs. The cable is thin and somewhat tangle-prone, similar to what is found on Fischer’s FA-788
Isolation (3/5) – Decent for a shallow-insertion design, especially with the included Comply eartips
Microphonics (3.5/5) – Surprisingly mild despite the earphones having to be worn cable-down
Comfort (4/5) – The half in-ear housings of the Beta are lightweight and sit well in the ear. The design mandates shallow insertion and the included Comply tips help comfort further, though replacing them can be a costly affair

Sound (6.7/10) – The Beta is an accurate earphone with fairly neutral tone and surprising range. For a half in-ear design, its bass has impressive depth and impact, both vastly superior to Fischer Audio’s similarly-priced FA-788. It is also punchier than the higher-end M1 model and the pricier Hippo 10EB. The bass is very clean and articulate and maintains impressive resolution for an earphone in the Beta’s price range – those not expecting a bass monster are sure to be pleased.

The mids of the Beta are recessed slightly compared to the bass and come across sounding a touch distant next to the M1 model. Clarity is excellent, however, and exaggerated further by the prominent treble. Detail resolution, too, is impressive for the price and the sound produced is clean, crisp, and edgy. The Beta is not something I would recommend for vocal-centric genres over the M1 but its reproduction of guitars has just the right amount of bite and texture. Whereas the M1 is refined and extremely smooth, the Beta is raw and full of energy.

There is a downside to the wild sound, however – at times the upper midrange and lower treble can come across wildly uncontrolled. The top end can be a touch splashy and sibilance ranges from mild to moderate depending on track, fit, and tips used. The included Complys do a good job of taming most of the treble but the Beta can still be fatiguing at higher volumes. Those who listen with the volume turned down, though, will find sparkly, clear, and moderately extended treble well worth the asking price.

In terms of presentation, the Beta is airy and open-sounding. Soundstage width is excellent and depth isn’t bad, either. Fischer’s FA-788 sounds much smaller and more congested in comparison and even the similarly open-sounding Hippo 10EB can’t match the soundstage size of the Beta. That said, the beta isn’t the most resolving earphone and doesn’t separate quite as well as the Brainwavz M1 does once things get busy. In addition, the space is not quite as cohesive and the imaging lags a little behind the M1. For its price, however, the Beta performs more than adequately and the sheer size of its soundstage is certain to impress.

Value (9/10) – While the old Beta Brainwavz Pro was a great value as an overall package, the new Beta gets by on sound quality alone. Like most entry-level half in-ear designs, it is not the best-built or most isolating set of earphones but for the asking price – and with sound quality this good – it is easy enough to forgive. Simply put, aside from a bit of sibilance the Beta may just be the best-sounding earphone in its price bracket. If that matters more than the functional nuances – as it should to many here at Head-Fi – there is no reason not to buy one.

Pros: comfortable half in-ear design; best-in-class sound quality
Cons: tangle-prone cabling; can be sibilant

 

 

 

Quote:
(3C20) Section 8 Earbuds

Section 8 earbuds 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Nov 2011

Details: bargain-bin earphones with endorsements ranging from Elvis to Tupac
Current Price: $10 from amazon.com (MSRP: $19.99)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: N/A | Freq: 20-20k Hz | Cable: 3.9’ I-plug
Nozzle Size: 5mm | Preferred tips: generic single-flange
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

Accessories (1/5) – Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes)
Build Quality (3/5) – The metal housings and nylon-sheathed cables are impressive at the price point but the lack of strain reliefs says little for long-term durability
Isolation (3.5/5) – Typical for a straight-barrel dynamic-driver earphone
Microphonics (3/5) – Mild when worn cable-down; very low when worn over-the-ear
Comfort (3.5/5) – Typical for a straight-barrel IEM. Housings are very lightweight and the housing lacks sharp edges, which helps.

Sound (3.7/10) – The Section 8 Earbuds are by no means Hi-Fi but they do sound surprisingly decent for the asking price. Clarity is vastly superior to that of the similarly-priced Skullcandy Smokin’ buds and the bass is deeper and less washed-out. The muddiness and warmth of the Smokin’ are gone as well, leaving a low end that, while not particularly detailed, doesn’t crowd out the midrange.

The mids are clean and clear, on the cold side in tone and a bit distant. There is a tinge to the upper midrange that makes the Section 8 buds sound a touch metallic and the earphones tend to distort more quickly than higher-end sets as the volume is turned up. The treble is prominent enough down low and rolls off towards the top. The soundstage is below average in size but the relatively decent bass control keeps it congestion-free compared to that of entry-level Skullcandy products. Layering, as expected for the price, is nearly nonexistent, making the earphones sound quite flat.

Value (7/10) – The Section 8 Earbuds are a competent bargain-bin product with a generic form factor and surprisingly clear sound. Available in a number of celebrity flavors, they put similarly-priced Skullcandy earphones to shame and can be a genuinely inoffensive listen, though those looking for fidelity will want to keep on saving up.

Pros: decent clarity, comfort, and isolation
Cons: distant sound with a metallic edge

 

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DnB Sublimity View Post

I have a random newb question - what's the best way to burn-in earphones without causing damage to the drivers?  I usually play some music from my computer for about 3-4 hours (medium volume), then I leave it overnight plugged into my computer with this burn-in audio file (medium vol), plus any additional listening I may do that day with my mp3 player.


That should be fine, not too different from my process and I haven't had any major issues.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Austin Morrow View Post

Joker, have I ever told you how awesome you are? biggrin.gif

 

Edit: Same with you Inks, your pretty awesome as well.


Thanks, and thanks to everyone who fields some of the questions in this thread. 

 


Edited by ljokerl - 11/7/11 at 9:41pm
post #4673 of 16802

void


Edited by bmeat - 8/15/14 at 11:24am
post #4674 of 16802

Thanks J!  Much appreciated.

post #4675 of 16802

is it me or the re272 big bi-flanges are different from the ones on the re262 ?

post #4676 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmeat View Post

the apple in ear really only deserve a 6.2 while the a151 and likes get a 7+? did they really do that bad with designing

 

let me rephase it my question. i dont need it to have lots of bass, i actually like a balanced (or a little more bass than flat) responce, but i want to be able to feel the bass there is, which i havent been able to do with the superfi4. will the apple in ear allow me to since it has a dedicated woofer?


Wait...so a low end UE dynamic, and you couldn't feel the bass? Then BA IEMs are not for you at all, they don't move a lot of air so you won't feel the bass, you can hear it but its usually nothing like a dynamic driver.

 

post #4677 of 16802

@ Joker: Thanks for your huge effort in this thread beerchug.gif

 

I am considering the UM Miracle and would like to know your impression of the sound vs. the 10dB peak in the frequency graph around 6kHz.

Is there an audible peak in that area (if you make a sine sweep) or is it just the mic. set-up that causes this?

 

post #4678 of 16802

void


Edited by bmeat - 8/15/14 at 11:24am
post #4679 of 16802

Ah sorry, thought they were dynamics. The bass impact you are looking for will most likely not be found with the addition of a second BA (higher end dual-BA are the exception). The ADDIEM are pretty low cost these days so it wouldn't hurt to try them to find out for yourself.

post #4680 of 16802

Thanks for the review on the Betas Joker. Can you give some suggestions for an upgrade with a similar sound signature and level of bass, but more refined in areas where the Betas are deficient? Thanks!

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