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Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 271

post #4051 of 16802

hmm that photo is of a J3 and not a sansa fuze :P

 

 

post #4052 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post


 

 

The midrange should not be sucked out enough to lose musical elements entirely. The M11+ isn't even that recessed (though next to the PL50 it might seem that way). It's just very bass-heavy but again that shouldn't be enough to lose vocals.

 


well, it does happens to me. 320kbps files on a clip+ , no EQ setting

(of course compared to the pl50 it'd sound like that, but i mean this's too much)

 

post #4053 of 16802
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rawrster View Post

hmm that photo is of a J3 and not a sansa fuze :P

 

 



The king is dead, etc. etc.

post #4054 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

I would guess the UE400 and UE500 are the same. Those are some very high quoted prices. The UE500/UE400 (presumably the same thing) sounds very different from the Beyer sets - not as warm or bassy but brighter, thinner, and more distant. They are good earphones but the signature is not for everyone. As for cables, some do and some don't. How the cable are attached matters just as much as the strength of the actual cables. I would put more stock in Beyer's build quality than UE's, personally. The DTX101 may not look it but it is a very solid product.

Thanks for the response, always if I want new IEM I keep reading, reading and reading. Just today I came across the Sennheiser CX6 for €62(travel editon of the IE6) they look great for the price, only not a lot of reviews on Head-Fi. I'm now leaning more towards the CX6 because of the price and I'm used to the sound of sennheisers. Are the CX6 a good choice for the price, also can you wear than normal(so not over the ear)? Thanks!
post #4055 of 16802
|joker| There's a possible UM sale, with 20 people ordering, there's a 20% deal. I've got the 1964-Ears triples and have just fallen in love with the e-Q5. Which of the UM line would you recommend?

Thanks
post #4056 of 16802

Just wanted to thank you |joker|, for all your help in promptly answering my PM's from time to time. Seems my universal journey is coming to a closure, until the next best thing comes around. As of late, I've been hooked on the analytical side of things, and my most belated discovery, the RE252, is now my second most preferred universal; second only to the EX1000 of course. I'd rank the two side by side, at the very top of my list, in terms of strictly preference that is. What I love most about the RE252 is just how pure/natural and raw it sounds, as though the music is reproduced just as was intended. All the while, the HiFiMan house signature is most certainly apparent (especially the magnificent mids), and the RE252's do retain a musical side for my ears. In turn, I'm able to appreciate all the nuances, while enjoying the music on end! There's no coloration, and when it comes to details, they hardly ever miss a beat. If I'm to be honest, ever since the RE252, I'm finding it more and more difficult to enjoy any signature with noticeable coloration. Not to mention, coupled with the LL sony hybrids, the fit/comfort excels that of any universal I've owned to date. Must be fate, because once they're in, they feel as though they're practically made for my ears. biggrin.gif

 

All that's left now is to pay the Ortofon's and Etymotic's a visit. Who knows? They may very well be my next RE252's. smile.gif

post #4057 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by i2ehan View Post

Just wanted to thank you |joker|, for all your help in promptly answering my PM's from time to time. Seems my universal journey is coming to a closure, until the next best thing comes around.


I guess that means your custom journey is beginning very soon? very_evil_smiley.gif

post #4058 of 16802

Hopefully much later than sooner my friend. wink.gif

post #4059 of 16802
Thread Starter 

Added Shure SE215 and Munitio SITi Nine Millimeter
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

(2C41) Shure SE215

Shure SE215 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Aug 2011

Details: Shure’s mid-range dynamic-driver earphone, featuring the same detachable cable system as the rest of the new lineup
Current Price: $100 from bhphotovideo.com (MSRP: $99.99); $40 more for Shure CBL-M+-K mic/remote accessory
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 20Ω | Sens: 107 dB | Freq: 22-17.5k Hz | Cable: 5.3’ L-plug
Nozzle Size: 2mm | Preferred tips: Shure gray flex, Shure Olives
Wear Style: Over-the-ear

Accessories (4/5) – Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes), Olive foam tips (3 sizes), cleaning tool, and soft clamshell carrying case
Build Quality (4/5) – The design and build of the SE215 mimic Shure’s newly-redesigned flagship SE535. The plastic housings are complimented by a beefy detachable cable with a locking and swiveling connector. Sadly the defect rate on the cable connectors seems to be unusually high
Isolation (4.5/5) – As with most ergo-fit monitors, the SE215 isolates a lot with the included Olive and flex sleeves and even more with aftermarket triple-flanges
Microphonics (4.5/5) – The SE215 can only be worn cable-up and microphonics are nearly nonexistent
Comfort (3.5/5) – While the SE215 is ergonomically-designed, fairly small, and quite lightweight, it suffers from the same issue as the SE535 to an even larger degree - the cable connectors are big, bulky, and angled too far forward for my liking and the memory helps make the earphones more difficult to position comfortably. I’m sure they will be comfortable for many but I find the fit awkward compared to the similarly-shaped Westone monitors

Sound (7.7/10) – Up until a recent month-long trial of the SE530 and SE535, my experience with Shure’s earphones was limited to the old SE115, E3, and E4C models, every single of one of which failed to impress when the time came to gauge sound quality against asking price. Shure’s aging mid-range models simply weren’t keeping up with products from many of the smaller Hi-Fi brands so well-liked around Head-Fi. With the dynamic microdriver used in the SE215, however, things are different – Shure has seemingly decided to attack the competition head-on. Of course, the engineers realized that the $100 SE215 is likely also going to be the model most popular in consumer-oriented retail environments and gave it an impressively consumer-friendly sound signature to boot.

Clearly emphasized over ‘flat’, the bass of the SE215 is powerful and carries good depth and detail. From memory, the older mid-range Shure models I’ve tried all yield to the SE215 in bass quantity and impact. Impact is plentiful on the whole, though the SE215 is not quite a bass monster. Compared to the Spider Realvoice, for example, the low end of the SE215 is a touch punchier and more detailed but less lush-sounding and liquid. The bass is quite well-controlled compared to bass-heavy competitors such as the Xears TD-III but sounds flabby and slow next to more hi-fi sets such as the VSonic GR07 and Sunrise Xcape v1.

The midrange of the SE215 is slightly warm and a little dry. It is balanced well enough with the bass, avoiding the mid-forward presentation of Shure’s flagships. Compared to the Xears TD-III and N3i, too, the midrange of the SE215 lacks a bit of authority and forwardness. On the whole, it sounds smooth, textured, and detailed – definitely a strong suit of the earphone. The SE215 surpasses the Spider Realvoice in detail and can be compared favorably to the MEElec CC51, with the Shures coming across slightly thicker and less fluid and the CC51s sounding cleaner and crisper, but not as warm or fleshed-out. The upper midrange of the Shures reveals a bit of grain but nothing distracting or even unpleasant. Really, aside from the balance, the biggest concession of the SE215 to the top-tier SE535 is a complete lack of the open feel of the latter.

The lower treble of the SE215 is plentiful but the earphone rolls off slightly at the very top and runs out of steam even earlier than that – lack of upper-end resolution and refinement is slightly more noticeable than with the old SE530. Like the SE530, the SE215 lacks a bit of energy and sparkle and can sound dull with some material. What’s there, however, is clean and inoffensive, though the SE215 does lose more resolution still as things get busy. Sibilance and harshness are usually left out of the equation but the signature of the SE215 does seem to encourage higher-volume listening in order to extract all of the detail the earphones have to offer - a problem I don’t have with the similarly-priced HiFiMan and Sunrise in-ears.

The presentation of the SE215 is pleasant – reasonably wide and with a good overall sense of distance, space, and position. There less depth and height to the stage than with the Spider Realvoice or Xears N3i but the presentation is generally sufficient. The Xears and Spiders tend to be more enveloping and 3D-sounding but the SE215 is by no means flat. The only real limiting factor is a perceived lack of air resulting from the laid-back treble and the subsequently underwhelming imaging. Still, instrument separation is decent and it is doubtful many will be disappointed with the presentation considering the price of the earphones.

Value (8.5/10) – Perhaps Shure’s most competent mid-range model to date, the SE215 is a thoroughly modern earphone in every sense. Highly isolating for a dynamic-driver set and boasting a smooth and detailed sound signature with an emphasis on bass and mids, the SE215 is poised to be a high-value in the consumer market. However, there are a few issues aside from the dullness of the signature that may make potential buyers wary. One is the unusually high defect rate with early-batch units - Shure doesn’t seem to have all of the bugs of the cable connectors worked out quite yet although complaints about the higher-end SE535, which uses the same connectors, seem far less common. The other caveat has to do with the ergonomics – the stiff memory wire and bulky connectors can get in the way of achieving the perfect fit. Anyone willing to look past these potential issues will be rewarded by a surprisingly competent brand-name earphone at a price that’s almost too reasonable.

Pros: High isolation, solid sound quality with consumer-friendly signature

Cons: Detachable cable can be unwieldy, may be uncomfortable for some users, high initial defect rate in early batches

 



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

(2A16) Munitio Teknine SITi Nine Millimeter

Munitio Teknine 9mm 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Aug 2011

Details: Bullet-shaped earphone from Munitio
Current Price: $159 from munitio.com (MSRP: $159); $179 for [M] SITi with microphone
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: N/A | Sens: 98 dB | Freq: 12-22k Hz | Cable: 4’ I-plug
Nozzle Size: 5mm | Preferred tips: Stock single-flanges
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

Accessories (2.5/5) – Single-flange silicone tips (4 pairs in 3 sizes), microfiber cleaning cloth, and soft leather carrying pouch
Build Quality (4.5/5) – Styled after a nine-millimeter round, the Teknines are noticeably smaller than the other bullet-shaped earphones I’ve come across and yet feel much sturdier. The fit and finish run with the best of the big-name manufacturers and the heft inspires confidence. The housings are engraved with the Munitio logo and the nozzles are protected by mesh filters. The Kevlar-reinforced cable is thicker than average and does a good job of staying untangled. It has a mild tendency to kink but should go the distance despite minimal strain relief. The cable cinch tends to let go of one side of the cable when tightened
Isolation (3.5/5) – Good for a dynamic-driver earphone and helped by the thicker-than-average eartips
Microphonics (4/5) – Slightly bothersome when worn cable-down; not an issue otherwise
Comfort (4/5) – The Teknines wear similarly to most other straight-barrel earphones. The housings are quite heavy – similar in weight to those of the Monster Jamz and Panasonic HJE900s – but slim and compact. They can be inserted deeper than the Fischer Silver Bullets and the stock tips are nice and thick. The cable-up configuration is preferable due to the heft of the housings

Sound (6.2/10) – As is usually the case with new entrants on the HiFi scene, I was quite unclear on what to expect from the Munitio Teknines. The minefield of marketing copy on Munitio’s website promises superior dynamic range, quick recovery, and sound purity, as well as tight and accurate bass and smooth treble response. All of these are important qualities for any IEM but the approach taken by Munitio in tuning the earphones makes them radically different from most of my other IEMs and very outlandish to my audiophile sensibilities. Whereas almost all of the gear we discuss around Head-Fi pursues balance, detail, and clarity, the Teknines have different priorities.

From the subbass onwards, the Teknines make no compromises whatsoever in favor of conventional ‘hi-fi’ sound. The inevitable comparison to the similarly-priced Monster Turbines reveals that the Teknines have more sub-bass presence, resulting in large amounts of deep, full-bodied bass rumble, and a touch more mid- and upper bass as well. Despite the massive bass boost, the Teknines present notes softly and smoothly, without the aggressive impact true bass monsters such as the Sony XB40EX and UE Super.Fi 5 EB. However, the real strength of the Monster Turbines – and the reason they are popular around Head-Fi – is that despite their bottom-heavy nature, they manage to keep the bass response where it belongs – under control and confined below the midrange frequencies. The Teknines, on the other hand, don’t do quite as good a job of controlling their low end. Though detail is quite decent, bass texture and resolution take a hit – the cheaper Fischer Audio Eterna does a slightly better job of distinguishing low notes and generally sounds crisper, not only down low but across the entire frequency range. The Teknines also possess somewhat lengthy attack and decay times even when compared to other bass-heavy, consumer-oriented earphones.

Any IEM with a single driver and a ton of soft-sounding bass is bound to have somewhat veiled mids, and the Teknines are no exception. The mids are slightly thick and a tad warm but not excessively so on either count. Even fully burned-in, however, the Munitios sound fairly veiled, especially at lower volumes. Raising the volume makes the veil much less noticeable and brings the earphones to life. Clarity is generally sub-par and some of the detail is masked. On the upside, the softened way in which the earphones present low notes does prevent the bass from crowding out the midrange completely and makes the Munitio one of the smoothest-sounding in-ears I’ve heard. Put together, the mids and bass provide a complimentary, well-blended sound despite all of its technical shortfalls – a far cry from the SF5EB, which assigns the bass to a separate driver, or the Fischer Audio Eterna, which has noticeably more recessed mids.

Expectedly, the treble transition and high end of the earphones are very smooth. The midrange veil thins out towards the top, permitting the high end to possess a bit of crispness in comparison to the midrange. The treble is still extremely soft, however - though the Fischer Audio Eterna handily beats the Teknines in clarity and resolution, it sounds very hard-edged and aggressive doing it. The Brainwavz M2, with its gently rolled-off upper treble, is more similar but still far more forward at the upper midrange than the Teknines. Indeed, the entire presentation of the Teknines is slightly distant, as if the veil had a very tangible thickness to it. Aside from the inner limit of the soundstage and slight lack of air, the presentation of the Teknines is pleasing, with above-average width and decent depth. The Eterna, which suffers from similar intimacy issues, sounds wider still and has slightly better imaging but at the same time thins out more to cover its massive soundstage. If anything, the soft and powerful bass of the Munitios allows them to envelop more of the soundstage in music. Dynamics are good and the Teknines can portray subtlety as well as aggression. That said, the low sensitivity of the earphones doesn’t do the low-volume performance any favors so expect to crank up the volume to get the full benefits.

Value (6/10) – In the past year we’ve seen several manufacturers go down the ammunition path with their designs but the Munitio Teknines may just be the most faithful take on the form factor yet. Carrying an inherent appeal to the ’18-24’ demographic, the shape also allows for rock-solid construction and general user-friendliness but it is the sound signature that really sets the Teknine apart from the field. Smooth and powerful, the earphones take ‘non-fatiguing’ sound to new extremes. There undoubtedly is a certain charm to their sound – a sense of brutality with a veneer of restrain. Their signature is perfect for those who, upon hearing any other earphone, immediately wish it to be smoother and bassier. On the other hand those who, like me, value clarity and separation above all, usually listen at low volumes, and prefer tight and quick to loud and ponderous will not be sold on the Teknines. Personally, I can think of hundreds of IEMs I’d buy before the Teknines, but then I am clearly not part of the target audience.

Pros: Excellent build quality, tons of bass, obscenely smooth and non-fatiguing
Cons: Sub-par clarity, overly soft and wooly sound





Quote:
Originally Posted by SpaceCake View Post

Thanks for the response, always if I want new IEM I keep reading, reading and reading. Just today I came across the Sennheiser CX6 for €62(travel editon of the IE6) they look great for the price, only not a lot of reviews on Head-Fi. I'm now leaning more towards the CX6 because of the price and I'm used to the sound of sennheisers. Are the CX6 a good choice for the price, also can you wear than normal(so not over the ear)? Thanks!


An IE6 for DTX71 money is a pretty good deal. They aren't meant to be worn cable-down but for me it's comfortable to do so anyway.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rroseperry View Post

|joker| There's a possible UM sale, with 20 people ordering, there's a 20% deal. I've got the 1964-Ears triples and have just fallen in love with the e-Q5. Which of the UM line would you recommend?

Thanks


I've only heard one custom from the UM line so I really don't know. The Miracle makes the 1964-T sound pretty poor in comparison but it's a pretty different signature.



Quote:
Originally Posted by i2ehan View Post

Just wanted to thank you |joker|, for all your help in promptly answering my PM's from time to time. Seems my universal journey is coming to a closure, until the next best thing comes around. As of late, I've been hooked on the analytical side of things, and my most belated discovery, the RE252, is now my second most preferred universal; second only to the EX1000 of course. I'd rank the two side by side, at the very top of my list, in terms of strictly preference that is. What I love most about the RE252 is just how pure/natural and raw it sounds, as though the music is reproduced just as was intended. All the while, the HiFiMan house signature is most certainly apparent (especially the magnificent mids), and the RE252's do retain a musical side for my ears. In turn, I'm able to appreciate all the nuances, while enjoying the music on end! There's no coloration, and when it comes to details, they hardly ever miss a beat. If I'm to be honest, ever since the RE252, I'm finding it more and more difficult to enjoy any signature with noticeable coloration. Not to mention, coupled with the LL sony hybrids, the fit/comfort excels that of any universal I've owned to date. Must be fate, because once they're in, they feel as though they're practically made for my ears. biggrin.gif

 

All that's left now is to pay the Ortofon's and Etymotic's a visit. Who knows? They may very well be my next RE252's. smile.gif


Cheers, you've certainly worked hard at finding the one. I've never seen someone throw themselves at high-end universals with such dedication wink.gif

post #4060 of 16802
|joker| wrote:
Quote:
I've only heard one custom from the UM line so I really don't know. The Miracle makes the 1964-T sound pretty poor in comparison but it's a pretty different signature.

More detailed, less warm?
post #4061 of 16802

Bah, my universal journey is coming to an end as well. It will between the FAD A1, FXT90, GR07(giving it a second chance) for an isolating IEM and then will probably pull the trigger on either the EX1000s or MDR7550s for lower isolation. FX500s I may keep as well. Don't think I'll go custom anytime soon, if I end up making more money in the future, then perhaps. Couple of things here and there are interesting, but there's very few and I'm probably not going to spend like before. 

 

edit: nice shure215 review. The rating mirrors what I think of them. 


Edited by Inks - 9/1/11 at 9:06pm
post #4062 of 16802

Hmmm....Interesting. I've considered ending my universal IEM journey as well. For sometime now, I've lost my enthusiasm when trying new IEMs. I think I've heard a good sample of what's on offer and not many have offered something fresh and exciting in the past several months. For me, EX-1000 + FX700, CK10 and SM3 offer enough variety and perhaps I'd retain a few others as well, but a nice reduction in numbers (I think I own close to 40, lost count somewhere redface.gif) is currently on. I don't think I will stay off customs forever since I always let my curiosity get ahead of any logic. But, it would take a while.

post #4063 of 16802

Quote:

Originally Posted by esanthosh View Post

Hmmm....Interesting. I've considered ending my universal IEM journey as well. For sometime now, I've lost my enthusiasm when trying new IEMs. I think I've heard a good sample of what's on offer and not many have offered something fresh and exciting in the past several months. For me, EX-1000 + FX700, CK10 and SM3 offer enough variety and perhaps I'd retain a few others as well, but a nice reduction in numbers (I think I own close to 40, lost count somewhere redface.gif) is currently on. I don't think I will stay off customs forever since I always let my curiosity get ahead of any logic. But, it would take a while.

Precisely! Though I must admit, the ES5 does look rather tasty... mmm, like candy for my ears... drool.gif

 

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post #4064 of 16802

After purchasing nearly 40 iems, I think going custom might be the answer.  The Unique Melody group buy seems very interesting.  Hint…hint.

post #4065 of 16802

Yay! Thanks for reviewing the SE215's. I'm always interested in knowing how you rate the headphones I already own.biggrin.gif

 

 

I'm (patiently, but not really) waiting for your TF10 review. I also have a silver cable for mine and would love to know what you think of that vs stock as well if you're interested.

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