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Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 231

post #3451 of 16803
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnoiserdc View Post

I had the dba-02 and ck10 which I also liked but my 1964 T are a bid diferent. 1964 T sounds darker than those headphones. More bass on the T and more treble on those universals.


Yeah my 1964-T has more mid-bass than a CK10/DBA-02 and smoother treble.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by xtremetechuk View Post

I find the CK10 to be slightly too bright at times, so maybe the 1964-T would be ideal.

 

Apparently the reshell will tame the highs.

 

I noticed that kozee only charge $90 for reshell, while 1964EARS charge $190. blink.gif



Fisher Hearing charges $90 as well I think. There was someone who reshelled a CK10 with an extra bass driver a while ago, though I think you'd have to go to Unique Melody for that.

post #3452 of 16803

Mike, I have a question. Have you tried any of the earphones in this thread that sound decent that would fit into phone if you wanted to use that? The mic isn't really needed as I don't need that. I'm looking mostly at one of the Phonak earphones. Today as I was leaving my J3 battery died leaving my Samsung Galaxy S only to find out that the plug on my 1964-T cable does not fit or at least a Neutrik straight plug does not fit since I had the stock cable reterminated. Usually my phone is my backup source in situations like these but I did not realize that it did not fit properly until it was too late.

post #3453 of 16803
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rawrster View Post

Mike, I have a question. Have you tried any of the earphones in this thread that sound decent that would fit into phone if you wanted to use that? The mic isn't really needed as I don't need that. I'm looking mostly at one of the Phonak earphones. Today as I was leaving my J3 battery died leaving my Samsung Galaxy S only to find out that the plug on my 1964-T cable does not fit or at least a Neutrik straight plug does not fit since I had the stock cable reterminated. Usually my phone is my backup source in situations like these but I did not realize that it did not fit properly until it was too late.


I think the vast majority of them do - a Neutrik I-plug is larger than pretty much anything you will find stock on an IEM (Shure's new cabling excepted). I have to admit that I'm not sure what the SGS headphone jack looks like. The one on my ZTE Blade is not recessed so anything fits as long as I take the case off. Phonak plugs should certainly fit. Of the stuff I've been using recently, the Sony EX600/EX1000 have unusually slim L-plugs and work with my phone even if I leave the case on.

 

post #3454 of 16803

sorry to keep aksing about the ok1 , im still considering getting them, but cant make my mind

are you sure thay come with 2 size bi-flanges? from pictures i only saw 1 size of bi-flange

 


Edited by kanuka - 7/4/11 at 2:52pm
post #3455 of 16803
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanuka View Post

sorry to keep aksing about the ok1 , im still considering getting them, but cant make my mind

are you sure thay come with 2 size bi-flanges? from pictures i only saw 1 size of bi-flange

 


Nope, not sure. The pair I reviewed was not mine so if an extra pair of tips made it into the package, I'd have no way of knowing. Nowadays I double check with manufacturer accessory lists (not that those are very accurate when the pack-ins keep changing) but I don't think I did that back then.

post #3456 of 16803

Joker, thanks for the awesome review! Can you or anyone give a comparison between the GR07 and the Westone 2.   From your review it appears that the GR07 has more bass punch and quality, treble slighty more forward on the Westone 2?   Also, my DBA's have that "live" sound, how many rows back are the GR07 or W2's?   Thanks for the feedback.

post #3457 of 16803

Hi, i have been lurking around for months, few months ago i bought ath ck100 on impulse being relatively new to the audio stuff. I'm starting to get irritated by the forward mids on some songs. I tried the UM3X it sounded really good but the bass doesnt extend well enough, and also the sm3 which i don't quite like the sound. Lastly shure 535 which sounded near to ck 100. I'm considering on UM3X so i would like to ask if there is any other IEMs you can recommend which has a wide soundstage, clarity and bass?

Thanks

post #3458 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

I think the vast majority of them do - a Neutrik I-plug is larger than pretty much anything you will find stock on an IEM (Shure's new cabling excepted). I have to admit that I'm not sure what the SGS headphone jack looks like. The one on my ZTE Blade is not recessed so anything fits as long as I take the case off. Phonak plugs should certainly fit. Of the stuff I've been using recently, the Sony EX600/EX1000 have unusually slim L-plugs and work with my phone even if I leave the case on.

 

 

That's a good point there. I did think of that after I wrote my message however. The neutrik is larger so I guess that's the downside of reterminating them into a straight plug. I don't think the jack is recessed or anything like that but rather the side where the plug is the phone is curved which makes the end of the plug on my cable impossible to reach all the way so I either get no sound or one side if I play with it a bit.
 

 

post #3459 of 16803
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by soundbear View Post

Joker, thanks for the awesome review! Can you or anyone give a comparison between the GR07 and the Westone 2.   From your review it appears that the GR07 has more bass punch and quality, treble slighty more forward on the Westone 2?   Also, my DBA's have that "live" sound, how many rows back are the GR07 or W2's?   Thanks for the feedback.


Being a dynamic the GR07 does do bass body and impact better than the W2. However, I would not say that the W2 has more forward treble. Rather, the W2 is slightly more intimate-sounding overall (despite having a good-sized stage) but the GR07 is more airy and sparkly. Don''t know if I can define space  in terms of rows very accurately but the GR07 is a little more distant than the W2, which itself is a little more distant than the DBA-02.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by shsh View Post

Hi, i have been lurking around for months, few months ago i bought ath ck100 on impulse being relatively new to the audio stuff. I'm starting to get irritated by the forward mids on some songs. I tried the UM3X it sounded really good but the bass doesnt extend well enough, and also the sm3 which i don't quite like the sound. Lastly shure 535 which sounded near to ck 100. I'm considering on UM3X so i would like to ask if there is any other IEMs you can recommend which has a wide soundstage, clarity and bass?

Thanks


The Westone 3, pretty much the polar opposite to the CK100.

 

post #3460 of 16803

Its a threat which many people come and go so I thought i should post here too. I a, looking for an electronic shop. Its based in HK, ships worldwide and its a big store. I think its a subsidiary company of  Samsung or something like that.

I also think they stock the Pleo dinosaur Toy.

 

Thanks for your lights!

post #3461 of 16803

Just purchased some HF5's. Really looking forward to them. I had it down to the B2's and DBA-02's, but the $95 price tag and amazing isolation sold me on the Etymotic's. I should get them in two days thanks to my Amazon Prime Trial. What do you think of them as an upgrade from my beloved RE0's? More or less light on the bass?

post #3462 of 16803

I currently have the Dr Dre Tours.  I'm considering returning it & getting the Ety HF5s.  Do you think I would enjoy that a lot better?  I like bass, but I don't think I like as much as the Beats Tour.
I mainly listen to modern music like hip hop/rap, r & b, & pop.

Thank you

post #3463 of 16803
Thread Starter 

Added the Soundmagic E30 & Blue Ever Blue 866B
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

(3A55) Soundmagic E30

Soundmagic E30 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Jul 2011

Details: Soundmagic’s follow-up to one of Head-Fi’s favourite budget IEMs
Current Price: $40 from houseofdap.com (MSRP: $40)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 12Ω | Sens: 94 dB | Freq: 15-22k Hz | Cable: 4’ I-plug
Nozzle Size: 5mm | Preferred tips: Stock bi-flanges
Wear Style: Over-the-ear

Accessories (3.5/5) – Single-flange (3 sizes) and bi-flange silicone tips, cable guides, shirt clip, and soft carrying pouch
Build Quality (3.5/5) – My old PL30 is still going strong after 2.5 years of near-constant use so I expected nothing less from the E30. However, the construction of the E30 is more similar to the PL50 with its glossy finish and short plastic strain reliefs. The cable seems identical to the old PL30 cord, being rubbery and a little thin, but Soundmagic have added a strain relief to the y-split and a metal shell to the 3.5mm I-plug. The bass switch, which was of no real use on the PL30, is gone
Isolation (2.5/5) – better nozzle angle means slightly more isolation than with the PL30
Microphonics (4.5/5) – Pretty much non-existent, especially with cable guides or shirt clip in place
Comfort (5/5) – The E30 is slimmer and smaller than the PL30 and boasts a more ergonomic nozzle angle. I do miss the foam tips that came with the PL30 but otherwise the E30 is about as comfortable as any in-ear

Sound (6.7/10) – The old Soundmagic PL30 was one of my favourite budget earphones due to a uniquely spacious and balanced sound with a slight mid-range emphasis – not a signature commonly found in the lower price brackets. With the new E30, the dynamic-driver monitor has been bumped to a higher price category. Fortunately, the sound quality seems to have kept up with the price increase, and then some.

The low end of the E30 has been emboldened, receiving a more prominent role in the overall soundscape compared to the old PL30. Next to the midrange, the bass is emphasized only mildly but compared to the laid-back bottom end of the PL30, the difference is quite large. Extension has been improved and the low end now sounds fuller and more impactful. Bass notes have more realistic weight and more drawn-out attack and decay times. Though I don’t mind the balance of the PL30 in the least, I’ll be the first to admit that the low end of the E30 sounds more natural in comparison. Still, the new earphone is by no means a bass monster and those who were previously in the PL30 camp will enjoy it much more than adherents of bass-heavy budget sets such as the MEElec M9.

The midrange of the E30 is just a touch less forward than that of the PL30 but seems more laid-back due to the greater bass emphasis of the new earphone. Despite its balance, the E30 actually manages to sound a little cooler in tone, and closer to what I would consider neutral. As with the PL30, the clarity will be enviable for the vast majority of similarly-priced IEMs, but the E30 also makes gains in detail and texture compared to its predecessor, sounding smooth and refined without major sacrifices in resolution.

The treble of the E30 is balanced well with the midrange, taking at most a half-step back in emphasis. It sounds clean and clear but not overly crisp as with the similarly-priced MEElec CX21. Top-end extension is sufficient – on par with the CX21 and Brainwavz M1. Music, as presented by the E30, generally sounds airy and open, helped along by better dynamics compared to the PL30 and a similarly large soundstage. Though it may not sound quite as wide as the PL30 in absolute terms, imaging and positioning are slightly improved and the whole presentation is more convincing and refined. Lastly, Soundmagic has managed to drop the sensitivity of the earphone a bit, which makes it far less likely to hiss heavily with a poorly matched source.

Value (8.5/10) – As well-liked as the old PL30 was in its price bracket, it is no competition for the modern sub-$50 heavyweights from the likes of MEElec and Brianwavz. The new E30, however, is a different matter. Making far fewer sacrifices to obtain the clarity and spaciousness many found so impressive about its predecessor, the E30 sounds more natural and refined. I see very few people preferring the old model to the new one in signature and even fewer arguing that they are similar in technical performance. I do have a couple of reservations worth voicing – the accessory pack, for one, has taken a dip into mediocrity with the new soft pouch and exclusion of foam tips, and the glossy plastic housings look slightly cheap next to the rubberized finish of my PL30. Barring these small complaints, the E30 is clearly one of the better overall performers at its price point.

Pros: Lightweight and extremely comfortable, spacious sound with slight bass emphasis
Cons: Mediocre isolation



(3A56) Blue Ever Blue 886B

Blue Ever Blue 866B 400x300.jpg
Reviewed Jul 2011

Details: HDSS earphone from Blue Ever Blue, the new earphone division of the BioLinks brand
Current Price: $40 from amazon.com (MSRP: $40)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 92 dB | Freq: 22-20k Hz | Cable: 4’ I-plug
Nozzle Size: 5mm | Preferred tips: Sony hybrids, stock single flanges
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

Accessories (2/5) – Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes) and soft carrying pouch
Build Quality (3/5) – The machined aluminum housings are lightweight, sturdy, and not bad to look at. The nozzles are protected by metal mesh filters and the housings generally feel well-made. Sadly, things go downhill from there as the generic, rubbery cable and minimal strain reliefs inspire little confidence
Isolation (3/5) – About average for vented, straight-barrel earphone
Microphonics (3/5) – Slightly worse than average and not helped by the lack of a cable cinch and shirt clip; tolerable with over-the-ear wear
Comfort (4.5/5) – The tapered housings of the 886B are lightweight and comfortable. The earphone does not require a deep seal to sound good and the cables are soft and flexible. The stock tips are quite decent as well

Sound (6.3/10) – The 886B, like all Blue Ever Blue earphones, utilizes ETL technology to absorb the energy of reflected waves in the driver chamber, preventing resonance and distortion. Or at least, that’s what theory dictates. The technology was originally used in speaker cabinets and its application to portable audio is fairly new. It is difficult to say, therefore, what the exact effect of ETL implementation is on the Blue Ever Blue earphones – much as with manufacturer claims of resonance being affected by choice of housing materials, the effect of ETL would need to be tested against a proper control to verify the manufacturer’s lofty claims.

Regardless of the technology’s mode of action and end goals, there is little doubt that for an entry-level product, the 866B sounds quite good. I don’t know about the claims of “smooth, layered sound” and “pure tone”, but the earphone is fairly neutral and quite enjoyable, if not technically flawless. The bass is probably its weakest point for me – it’s got good depth and impact but lacks a bit of definition and can overpower the rest of the range. The ability of the bass to step forward and crowd out the (prominent) midrange of the earphones despite the 866B not being a bass monster can be slightly off-putting at first but the balance works most of the time. It really is only in direct comparisons with some of the better earphones in the price range that the 866B starts losing ground in low-end clarity and control.

The 866B performs more consistently in the midrange, which is prominent and slightly full. There is a mild thickness of note and the clarity and detail still lag behind competing sets such as the Soundmagic E30 but one the whole the mids are quite realistic for the price. The tone of the earphones is very slightly on the dark side of neutral and doesn’t seem to suffer from the bass boost. The treble is, for the most part, inoffensive, with a very slight bit of roughness and a small amount of presence missing at the very top. It’s not as crisp as that of the MEElec CX21, but it’s not wooly or overly soft, either.

The presentation is a bit less impressive than the midrange and treble performance but still quite good. The slight thickness of the 866B causes it sound a little congested and the earphone lacks the wide-open feel of the Soundmagic E30. Layering is good but the size of the stage is average, with the presentation leaning towards intimacy. The dynamics of the earphone lagging behind the competition from Soundmagic and Brainwavz don’t help matters much. With a leaner-sounding earphone, the presentation of the 866B would likely work much better. As is, it just comes across sounding slightly ‘concentrated’ and lacking a bit of refinement compared to the real heavy-hitters in the price range.

Value (7/10) – The Blue Ever Blue 866B performs well enough for the asking price and offers a very user-friendly, if basic, design. Several years ago the 866B would have scored very highly as an overall package but lovers of budget IEMs have been spoiled not just by the ridiculous performance offered by some of today’s earphones, but also by the build quality and overall attention to detail, which are being taken further still by the likes of Dunu. The entire earphone seems to be as much a proof of concept as a finished product and while I do appreciate the claims made by the HDSS standard, for the purposes of this review the technology is only worth as much as the end result. The sound of the earphone is cohesive and enjoyable for an entry-level product but there are options that sound just as good without the generic construction and barebones accessory pack.

Pros: Lightweight and comfortable; nice midrange and treble
Cons: Mediocre cabling; could be tighter at the low end

 



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdraluck23 View Post

Just purchased some HF5's. Really looking forward to them. I had it down to the B2's and DBA-02's, but the $95 price tag and amazing isolation sold me on the Etymotic's. I should get them in two days thanks to my Amazon Prime Trial. What do you think of them as an upgrade from my beloved RE0's? More or less light on the bass?


With a good seal the HF5 should have impact similar to the RE0 but with slightly quicker note presentation and leaner body.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by ashinyforehead View Post

I currently have the Dr Dre Tours.  I'm considering returning it & getting the Ety HF5s.  Do you think I would enjoy that a lot better?  I like bass, but I don't think I like as much as the Beats Tour.
I mainly listen to modern music like hip hop/rap, r & b, & pop.

Thank you



Those are at pretty opposite extremes in terms of sound signature. I think the changeover to the HF5 from the Tours would be mildly shocking and would recommend grabbing something in the middle instead if you want a try a more 'hi-fi' sound - maybe a Brainwavz M3, MEElec CC51, or ECCI PR401 - or even a better bass-heavy phone than the Tours, such as the Monster Turbine, Fischer Eterna, or Beyer DTX 101.

post #3464 of 16803

great update! i was waiting for the SM review. too bad there's no enough isolation and that the accessories are less than the pl30 (both versions)

post #3465 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

Those are at pretty opposite extremes in terms of sound signature. I think the changeover to the HF5 from the Tours would be mildly shocking and would recommend grabbing something in the middle instead if you want a try a more 'hi-fi' sound - maybe a Brainwavz M3, MEElec CC51, or ECCI PR401 - or even a better bass-heavy phone than the Tours, such as the Monster Turbine, Fischer Eterna, or Beyer DTX 101.


Why do you say the Ety HF5s would be mildly shocking?  I enjoy the sound & bass level of the Klipsch S4 my father has, but I do not wish to purchase those.  I want a better earphone.  Do you enjoy the sound of the HF5s?  & How do you test earphones since most of these aren't in stores on display?

 

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