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Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 227

post #3391 of 16802

Listening to the cx21 i really like them and find your impressions really accurate! Actually i like the sound more than brainwavz M1. Its more transparent and clear. I am happy because through decent budget iems i am starting to find my signature.

 

The cable is also great and finally i saw the so much praised meelec cable.It stays over my ear perfectly. The brainwavz cable seems that doesnt stay over my ear.

 

 

P.S omg cx21 are bass monsters if you want. They are the only iems that dont distort with cowon j3's x-bass eq. Even if idont like huge bass i like to test my brain from time to time B)


Edited by Angelopsaro - 6/26/11 at 2:53pm
post #3392 of 16802
Thread Starter 

Added the ECCI PG100 and Skullcandy Holua
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

(3B27) ECCI PG100
 
ECCI PG100 400x300.jpg
Reviewed June 2011
 
Details: angled-nozzle earphone designed to replace the PR100 as ECCI's entry-level model
Current Price: $27 from lendmeurears.com (MSRP: $27)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 18Ω | Sens: 104 dB | Freq: 10-20k Hz | Cable: 4.2’ I-plug
Nozzle Size: N/A (oval) | Preferred tips: Stock single-flanges, generic bi-flanges
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear
 
Accessories (3.5/5) – Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes), shirt clip, and oversize hard clamshell carrying case
Build Quality (3/5) – The housings are plastic though the molding quality is quite nice. The cable is plasticky and average in thickness. Unfortunately, there is no strain relief on the plastic stems and no sliding cable cinch on the cord
Isolation (3/5) – The PG100 is a vented, shallow-insertion earphone. Isolation is rather average with the stock tips and a bit better with aftermarket biflanges
Microphonics (3/5) – Bothersome when worn cable-down and the earphones are difficult to wear over-the-ear, exacerbating the problem
Comfort (4.5/5) – The PG100 is very small and weighs next to nothing. The housing are meant to be worn like conventional earbuds with the oval nozzles angled for comfortable insertion into the ear canal. The stems are rounded and angled away from the ear – ECCI has clearly done more homework than Yamaha did with their similarly-tiny EPH-20
 
Sound (5.2/10) – ECCI’s previous entry-level model, the PR100, was a balanced and neutral affair, performing similarly to the pricier PR200 on the whole. The new PG100 is a bit of a departure from the higher-end ECCI earphones, offering a slightly darker and more bass-heavy sound. The bass of the PG100 beats the Soundmagic PL30 and H2O Audio Flex easily in quantity but stops short of the power and depth offered by the bass-monster MEElec M9. The low end is punchy and a touch boomy. There is slight bottom-end roll-off but it’s quite inoffensive. Bass bleed is minimal although the midrange does lack some clarity next to the H2O Flex, sounding veiled and a bit muffled. The overall balance is good – the midrange is not nearly as recessed as with the MEElec M9 but not as forward as with the PL30 or H2O Flex.
 
A bit of grain is present in the midrange and treble but the PG100 is still smoother than the sparklier, peakier MEElec M9. Indeed, the sound of the M9 is a good bit more v-shaped on the whole so those looking for flat-and-level will be better off with the ECCIs. Top-end extension is moderate – similar to the M9 and many other budget sets. The presentation of the PG100 is average in size, leaning towards the intimate side of things. The Soundmagic PL30 sounds far more open and spacious. The M9, too, has more air to its sound, as well as a bit more width. The slightly veiled midrange of the PG100 doesn’t do its presentation any favors but the earphone still presents a coherent sonic image. The overall tone is slightly dark.
 
Value (8/10) – Unlike the PR100 model it replaces, the ECCI PG100 sets itself apart from the higher-end PR200 and PR300 models by offering a slightly more consumer-friendly sound in a very different form factor. The compact half in-ear design is lightweight and comfortable and the sound is well-balanced with a slight bias towards the low end. It’s not going to embarrass the other solid entry-level sets on the market but it does provide a very viable alternative.
 
Pros: Small, lightweight, and comfortable; sounds good for the money
Cons: Mildly microphonic, not as well-built as previous PR100 model

 

 

 


 



Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

(3A54) Skullcandy Holua

 

Skullcandy Holua 400x300.jpg

Reviewed Jun 2011

 

Details: Wooden in-ear from Skullcandy

Current Price: $46 from amazon.com (MSRP: $99.95); $49 for mic-and-remote version

Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: N/A | Freq: 18-20k Hz | Cable: 4’ I-plug

Nozzle Size: 5mm | Preferred tips: Stock single-flanges

Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

 

Accessories (3.5/5) – Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes), Comply foam tips, and hemp clamshell carrying case with mesh lid

Build Quality (2.5/5) – Skullcandy clearly took the wood theme close to heart with the Holua – not only is the driver chamber made of wood, but so are the nozzles and stems. The housings feel reasonably solid but the nylon-sheathed cable tends to kink. In addition, the hideous plastic mic/remote unit looks like it came out of a cereal box and there are no strain reliefs anywhere on the earphone. Left/right markings are missing as well and moderate driver flex is present

Isolation (3.5/5) – The rounded housings contribute to fairly decent isolation and the included Comply tips are always a plus for isolation

Microphonics (3/5) – Bothersome when worn cable-down; fine otherwise

Comfort (4/5) – The housings of the Holua are very lightweight and rounded at the front for comfortable fitment. Stock tips are of good quality and a set of Comply foamies is included. One slight issue with over-the-ear wear is the nylon cable popping out from behind the ear due to a lack of shirt clip and cable cinch/p>

 

Sound (4.5/10) – The Holua feels right at home competing against bass-heavy wooden earphones from Thinksound and Xears. Quantitatively, the Holua has a bit less bass than the Xears TD-III but its low end is slower and more boomy in character. Next to the competition the Holua suffers from a relative lack of bass control, which causes it to sound slightly muddy and lacking in resolution. Expectedly, the bass does bleed into the midrange, which otherwise has good presence and decent clarity. The Holua is a warm earphone but usually manages to keep up with the cheaper Fischer Audio Daleth in clarity, if only just. In terms of balance, the mids are a touch forward but still manage to be somewhat veiled at all times. On the upside, the midrange and treble are very smooth – more so than with the metallic-sounding Skullcandy TiTans or the entry-level Ink’d buds. The lower treble is balanced well with the mids, mostly by virtue of several flattened peaks, but upper treble is slightly recessed. Treble extension and resolution are average.

 

The presentation of the Holua is good for a Skullcandy product but really doesn’t keep up with the other earphones in its price bracket. The soundstage is below average in width and depth and fails to escape the mild congestion that plagues most mainstream entry-level earphones. Instrumental separation is mediocre as well, especially when a track is muddied up by the bass though, to be fair, the cheaper FMJ model fares far worse. The Holua is still the best Skullcandy earphone I’ve heard and puts up a decent, if uninspired, performance. It is not quite the shift towards sound quality that I was hoping for from one of Skullcandy’s priciest in-ears but, at the very least, I can easily listen to the Holua for any length of time without losing the will to live (which can’t be said for the FMJ).

 

Value (5.5/10) – The Skullcandy Holua is not a bad product per se – the accessory pack, fit, isolation, and even build quality (with Skullcandy’s lifetime warranty factored in) are on-par with the most of the big-brand IEMs in its price range. However, similar sound quality can easily be had for less money and even those looking specifically for a wooden in-ear with mic should be able to pick up a Woodees IESW100B for less. What it comes down to, then, is the looks and the warranty – the only two factors making the Holua stand in a very busy market segment.

 

Pros: Lightweight and comfortable; Comply tips included; lifetime warranty

Cons: Moderate driver flex; frustrating nylon cable; sub-par sound quality

 

A longer review with comparisons against the Fischer Audio Daleth, Thinksound TS02, Woodees Blues, and Xears TD-III can be found here


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by carfentanil View Post

My numbers were drawn from the text reviews after re-re-re-checking the table got to me... I'm not sure how joker updates the visual readout, but sure he's quite busy as is. 


If you knew, you would laugh at me.

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by carfentanil View Post

Nice eye for the VSonic number. Whenever I put up an update, prolly next weekend it'll be reflected. No time atm, but I have 177 in the .xlsx and joker says 178 models in thread. I'll fix it next time.


This discrepancy was due to the separate releases of the ViSang R03 and Brainwavz M2. They were released at different times and originally posted as two reviews. Later I combined them together just noting the differences. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by vwinter View Post

Joker might change a good portion of the data after the UM Miracle review. Should be fun lol.

 

I'll be sure to make the raw data available at that point - there's no sense in anyone else suffering through manually entering 180+ data points.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelopsaro View Post

Listening to the cx21 i really like them and find your impressions really accurate! Actually i like the sound more than brainwavz M1. Its more transparent and clear. I am happy because through decent budget iems i am starting to find my signature.

 

The cable is also great and finally i saw the so much praised meelec cable.It stays over my ear perfectly. The brainwavz cable seems that doesnt stay over my ear.

 

 

P.S omg cx21 are bass monsters if you want. They are the only iems that dont distort with cowon j3's x-bass eq. Even if idont like huge bass i like to test my brain from time to time B)


Thanks. The driver used in the CX21 is indeed very good. The tuning is unusual for a <$40 earphone and will not be to everyone's liking which I guess is why it hasn't gotten too much love around here.

 

post #3393 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

Thanks. The driver used in the CX21 is indeed very good. The tuning is unusual for a <$40 earphone and will not be to everyone's liking which I guess is why it hasn't gotten too much love around here.

 


 

It extents better in all direction compared to the M1. I found soundstage also more realistic. It might be brain burn, but i should had been the opposite if that was the case.

Why some wouldnt like this kind of sg?

 

How would you compare the cable, the comfort and the signature with the vsonic07 in 2 lines.?

Sorry for you time.redface.gifksc75smile.gif

post #3394 of 16802
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Angelopsaro View Post

 

How would you compare the cable, the comfort and the signature with the vsonic07 in 2 lines.?

Sorry for you time.redface.gifksc75smile.gif

 

GR07 cable is a little stiffer than the MEElec cord but really not bad at all. It's well-relieved and very sturdy. Sound-wise the GR07 will be much more detailed and refined, with a more convincing presentation and better dynamics. The CX21 is a good entry-level in-ear but nuanced it is not. Comfort is a personal thing but I find the GR07 no less comfortable than the CX21, not that I've had problems with either.


Edited by ljokerl - 6/26/11 at 7:42pm
post #3395 of 16802

I got my CK10 today. I was skeptical of the score you gave it, and now I now why you like it so much.  It's simply amazing, it's not like any IEMs I've heard of.  I also agree with the score you gave for 1964-Ts which I have also.  Great customs.

post #3396 of 16802

Any IEMs that have bass impact that is similar but better to the SP51 and has a large soundstage with very good midrange and treble with a price between $100-$130?

post #3397 of 16802

Gonna purchase the CC51 and VB's. Can someone confirm that the Hephaes Sound Sig is similar to the Sennheiser IE7 Sound Sig?

post #3398 of 16802
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by user02 View Post

I got my CK10 today. I was skeptical of the score you gave it, and now I now why you like it so much.  It's simply amazing, it's not like any IEMs I've heard of.  I also agree with the score you gave for 1964-Ts which I have also.  Great customs.


Good to hear! The CK10 seems to be a difficult one to approach objectively for some. It's not the best universal out there but what it does right, it does very right. With the right combination of fit, ears, and preferences, it can be fantastic. Otherwise, it's just another in a long list of available top-tiers.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Niyologist View Post

Any IEMs that have bass impact that is similar but better to the SP51 and has a large soundstage with very good midrange and treble with a price between $100-$130?


Eterna, IE6, used DDM, maybe Xears N3i.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Niyologist View Post

Can someone confirm that the Hephaes Sound Sig is similar to the Sennheiser IE7 Sound Sig?

 

Signature? Maybe, though it's not quite as punchy or mid-happy as the IE7. Also sounds a touch congested next to the spacious Sennheisers, at least with the ~20 hours of burn-in I have on it. I think the IE6 is a more fair comparison, being dryer and a bit smaller in staging than the IE7.
 

post #3399 of 16802


 

Quote:

Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

Eterna, IE6, used DDM, maybe Xears N3i.

 

Signature? Maybe, though it's not quite as punchy or mid-happy as the IE7. Also sounds a touch congested next to the spacious Sennheisers, at least with the ~20 hours of burn-in I have on it. I think the IE6 is a more fair comparison, being dryer and a bit smaller in staging than the IE7.

 

    

     Thanks for the info! cool.gif

 

post #3400 of 16802

Does the Hephaes have a good warranty?

post #3401 of 16802

Scratch the VB. Now going with only the CC51. I can only afford that with the Audeo Phonak PFE Ear Guide.

post #3402 of 16802

I would also like to thank you here since i've picked the brainwavz M2 based on what i've read here.

They are my first IEM so i didn't want to put lot of bucks in them and they are indeed comfortable with a good sound. You said the isolation wasn't that good but I do not have any problem with it, I do not hear what happens outside my world <3

 

post #3403 of 16802

I'm wondering. The bass of the VB Vs. The bass of the CC51?

 

Also, will the Custom EQ from my Sansa Fuze be enough to near the bass of the SP51 without covering the midrange too much?

 

Sorry for asking so many questions. I'm just a person who is growing from the mid-bass hump to the sub-bass area with added clarity. A maturing audiophile is more of the technical term.


Edited by Niyologist - 6/28/11 at 7:02am
post #3404 of 16802
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Niyologist View Post

Does the Hephaes have a good warranty?


I have no idea... that's probably something you want to ask a dealer. It does have excellent build quality like the rest of DUNU sets, though.



Quote:
Originally Posted by mukumi View Post

I would also like to thank you here since i've picked the brainwavz M2 based on what i've read here.

They are my first IEM so i didn't want to put lot of bucks in them and they are indeed comfortable with a good sound. You said the isolation wasn't that good but I do not have any problem with it, I do not hear what happens outside my world <3

 


Glad the thread was useful! The M2 is a great performer and I think you'll find that with music playing the vast majority of in-ears isolate enough for a typical commute.

 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Niyologist View Post

I'm wondering. The bass of the VB Vs. The bass of the CC51?

 

Also, will the Custom EQ from my Sansa Fuze be enough to near the bass of the SP51 without covering the midrange too much?

 

Sorry for asking so many questions. I'm just a person who is growing from the mid-bass hump to the sub-bass area with added clarity. A maturing audiophile is more of the technical term.

VB puts emphasis on the sub-bass. The CC51 puts emphasis on mid/upper bass though not nearly to the same extent as SP51+black port. Both the CC51 and VB are extremely clear in the midrange and treble but I'm not sure you'll be able to EQ either to the extremes of the SP51.... maybe to the impact of the matte port.

post #3405 of 16802
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 


I have no idea... that's probably something you want to ask a dealer. It does have excellent build quality like the rest of DUNU sets, though.


VB puts emphasis on the sub-bass. The CC51 puts emphasis on mid/upper bass though not nearly to the same extent as SP51+black port. Both the CC51 and VB are extremely clear in the midrange and treble but I'm not sure you'll be able to EQ either to the extremes of the SP51.... maybe to the impact of the matte port.

    

     Thank you ljokerl. I won't regret my purchase of the CC51 because the VB's have terrible build quality, so I don't want to constantly replace them.
 

 

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