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Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 846

post #12676 of 16803
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonYeol View Post

Feels like they really need some kind of USP or very good performance to sell something that looks way less sexy than the black/red W4 or the kind of tacky UE900 or any of the other quad/tri BA's. But interesting. I'm very interested in the top model from Audio Techn. Since the CK100Pro was very interesting and quite unique compared to a lot of the other in ears I've heard.

 

*disclaimer: my crappy photos make certain plastics look much worse than they do in reality.

 

I wouldn’t say the Audiofly stuff looks worse than the W4 up close. Maybe the gray one but not the dark red/blue ones.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomscy2000 View Post
 

 

Yeah, I've seen the tech sheet; looks a little better in real-world lighting, very low-key and not flashy.

 

It'll certainly be interesting to compare it against the W40. The W40 has noticeably better ergonomic feel over the old 4/4R, so if the AF180 isn't any better in that category, then it'll lose out automatically due to its lesser reputation. AFAIK, the accessories aren't as well-appointed either. Westone now gives people both the non-mic and mic cables, right? Along with an improved Monitor Vault that seems to be less prone to breaking (the hinges on mine broke after two months). How do these Audiofly cables feel against the new EPIC cables (and UE's and Shure's, for that matter)?

 

There's now a "glut" of four-driver universals on the marketplace. High-end models like the 846 and 334 aside, the Nuforce Primo 8 and Audiofly AF180 are both set to release soon, alongside the Westone W40 and Audio-Technica ATH-IM04 (which is strangely getting some hate, for whatever reason), not to mention the Noble 4.

 

The W40 and UM Pro 30 looked great at the show, would love to compare those with the Audiofly sets head to head for sure.

 

I didn’t feel that the cables were lacking in any way but of course long-term use would be more telling. Curious if the cloth sheathing will kink or not.

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amitl View Post
 

Joker...any plans on the Audio Technica ATH-IM70?? :)

 

Not at this time.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny2ears View Post
 

Hey Joker

 

First of all, let me say thank you again! A year ago, following your advice i bought a MeElectronics Cw31 as substitute for my cx300, since i wanted something more "clean". I loved the CW31's. Great sound, good bass extent, good mids etc etc (comparing agains't my cx300 and agains't the Galaxy S4 headphones)the best i ever heard. unfortunatly i broke this, snaped the cord in half.

 

Now i'm wondering about a replacement, since  you had recommended the Cw31, E30 and the M3, and considerig the same price range, i was now debating on whether i should get the M3 (still available for 60€ [80$]) or the Aurvana Live!.

 

I loved the CW's, and i gues the only thing i would change a bit, would just have a tiny bit more bass...hum...impact? How can i say this, deep bloomy voices sounded good, but i wish they could have a bit more warminess to it. Not much more, just a tad.

 

Do you have different sugestions than those 2? You're always testing new products, and maybe some new contender pops out thats really worth it. I know the Aurvana are no IEM, but since i know you tried them both and since i really come to respect all your hard work (btw still waiting for the Aurvana 2 review :p) i trust your opinion greatly.

 

Thanks again man. cheers

 

If you’re okay with headphones I have no reason not to recommend the CAL!. It’s not very portable but it’s a great headphone with a warm, impactful sound. Don’t like comparing headphones to IEMs though.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by donedj View Post
 

hi joker

MA750i sounds promising but they look heavy and not comfortable. Are they good for using 4-5 hours/day?

 

Thanks

 

Depends on your ears. They are more comfortable than I expected and I can wear them for 2-3 hours with no problem but longer than that might be problematic.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deviltooth View Post
 

I've really enjoyed the CES coverage; it's definitely given me some new products to think about.

 

Regarding Audiofly: I hope they've got their act together quality wise.  My girlfriend's AF56 had the housing split twice, the second time even glue couldn't save it.  Now they're marketing much more expensive IEMs so the quality control had better be leagues better.

 

Same :o 

 

That's too bad about the AF56 - I really hope the new line fares better. 

post #12677 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by donedj View Post
 

hi joker

MA750i sounds promising but they look heavy and not comfortable. Are they good for using 4-5 hours/day?

 

Thanks

Hey FYI...the Discovery thread is hyping up a cheapo iem - Xiaomi Piston 2.0 - with a ton off talk about how good their sound quality is.  Several well respected Head-fiers have compared to MA750 very positively.  

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/586909/the-discovery-thread-new-zero-audio-doppios-pg1197-kef-m200-pg835-philips-fidelio-s2-pg-724/19575#post_10182214

post #12678 of 16803

Joker, any plans/interests in checking out the HM700 + RE-400B combo?  Initial impressions seem good so far.  Even if the player itself is kind of basic and limited in features it apparently was tuned specifically with the RE-400 in mind and reportedly has a good amp section to drive the included balanced version.  I thought being a fan of the RE-400 it may be on your radar :cool: 

post #12679 of 16803
Thread Starter 

Added RHA MA750. The overall ranking has been updated here.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post
 

 

(2B26) RHA MA750 / MA750i

 

Reviewed December 2014

 

Details: Flagship in-ear from Scotland-based RHA

MSRP: $119.95 (manufacturer’s page); $129.95 for MA750i w/mic & 3-button remote (manufacturer’s page

Current Price: $120 from amazon.com for MA750; $130 from amazon.com for MA750i

Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 100 dB | Freq: 16-22k Hz | Cable: 4.4' I-plug

Nozzle Size: 4.5mm | Preferred tips: Stock single-flanges

Wear Style: Over-the-ear

 

Accessories (5/5) – Single-flange (6 pairs in 3 sizes) and double-flange (2 sizes) silicone tips, foam tips (2 pairs), shirt clip, stainless steel eartip caddy, and zippered leather carrying case

Build Quality (5/5) – As with RHA’s lower-end models, the construction is impeccable. The MA750 boasts machined aluminum housings, metal nozzle filters, and thick, rubbery cables. At the earphone end there is a molded “earhook” section about 4” long. It’s not memory wire, but it’s a lot more comfortable than the earhooks I’ve come across in the past. The cable is thick and tangle-resistant, and all of the hardware is metal, including the 3.5mm I-plug with a long “spring” strain relief. The 3-year warranty is very impressive as well

Isolation (3.5/5) – The housings are narrow at the front, allowing a good insertion depth and good isolation

Microphonics (4.5/5) – The cable carries some noise but microphonics are generally not a problem due to mandatory over-the-ear fitment and the fact that the cord is thick and heavy, and doesn’t move around much

Comfort (4/5) – The earphone housings have a familiar flared shape a-la Dunu Trident and RHA’s lower-end models. The earpieces of the MA750 made of stainless steel, though, so they are a little heavier. The small diameter at the front nonetheless affords a surprisingly comfortable fit considering the weight

 

Sound (8.9/10) – The previous RHA earphones I’ve tried left me impressed with their bass power and clarity, but the new MA750 is a strong performer all around. Its signature is predicated on enhanced bass, but less so compared to the lower-end models. It has a strong emphasis on sub-bass, and a little less on mid-bass. The bass quantity is not at what I would consider “basshead” level – deep bass presence is good with the MA750 but there’s not too much mid-bass punch compared to some of its competitors. On the other hand it is a lot bassier than the HiFiMan RE-400, which sounds more controlled but appears deficient in subbass in comparison the RHA unit.

 

The MA750 is warm in tone, but not overly so. It has decent enough treble presence to balance out the bass, though it is certainly is not a neutral earphone. The midrange is rich and full-bodied, with very decent clarity considering the sound signature. Clarity is better than with many other stereotypically “warm” earphones, such as the Sony MH1C and Dunu Trident. The RE-400, on the other hand, is more mid-centric, but still sounds more neutral and is a little clearer through its midrange. The pricier Dunu DN-1000 hybrid, too, is clearer, making the MA750 sound veiled comparison.

 

The upper midrange of the MA750 is energetic but emphasis diminishes before getting into the regions that typically cause harshness and sibilance. The MA750 is brighter overall compared to the Sony MH1C and Dunu Trident and has a slight tendency to sound “tizzy”, especially at high volumes, thanks to the lower treble emphasis. It isn’t bothersome, however, and I definitely would not call the treble energy excessive. On the other end of the spectrum, the Dunu DN-1000 has treble that is brighter and more revealing of artifacts, making the MA750 sound quite smooth in comparison.

 

Presentation-wise, the MA750 performs well for the price. Its soundstage is larger than those of the MH1C and Trident, and separation is better as well. The Trident especially sounds more in-the-head and congested in comparison. Aside from the enhanced bass having the ability to throw a slight veil over minute details and take away from its imaging ability, there is not much to complain about with the MA750 here.

 

Select Comparisons

 

RHA MA350 ($40)

 

RHA’s $40 MA350 is one of my favorite budget-friendly sets for enhanced bass, but while the flagship model does command a healthy price premium, it also offers up a significantly more refined sound. The MA350 has strong, domineering bass, but the MA750 manages to sound rich and full-bodied while maintaining lower overall bass quantity and better bass control. It’s more balanced, as well as smoother and more refined. The treble of the MA350 is a little grainy in comparison, and more prone to harshness. The MA750 sounds more natural and enjoys a larger presentation with better depth and separation, making the MA350 appear congested in comparison.

 

Onkyo IE-HF300 ($129)

 

The IE-HF300 couldn’t be more different from the RHA MA750 in design, but sonically both earphones tend towards a warm, enhanced-bass sound. The RHA unit boasts bass that is both more extended and more powerful overall. The HF300, meanwhile, has less bass quantity with a focus on mid-bass. This results in mids that are a little more veiled compared to the MA750. The MA750 sounds clearer and more crisp, though it is a little more laid-back at the top end compared to the Onkyos. Both earphones boast above-average soundstages, with the HF300 being a little more open-sounding.

 

RBH EP1 ($149)

 

Yet another enhanced-bass, consumer-friendly earphone in the sub-$150 range, the EP1 nonetheless offers a sizable contrast to the MA750. Both earphones have a strong emphasis on bass but the MA750 is a little more powerful here, which gives it a warmer and more full-bodied sound. The RBH earphones place more emphasis on the midrange and sound a little clearer as a result. The MA750, on the other hand, has a thicker midrange presentation and a smoother and more forgiving sound. The RHA also boasts a slightly wider presentation and tonal character that, to me, is more natural overall.

 

VSonic GR07 Bass Edition ($179)

 

This earphone’s “Bass Edition” moniker is only true insofar as it is more bass-heavy than the regular GR07. Next to the MA750, however, the GR07BE sounds rather balanced. The RHA unit has more bass and a warmer tonal character while the GR07 is closer to neutral. The bass of the MA750 is boomier and results in more veiling of the midrange. The GR07BE lacks some of the full-bodied character of the RHA, but remains clearer, especially in the midrange. Up top, the MA750 is a little smoother where it counts while the GR07 is more sibilance-prone.

 

Value (9/10) – The RHA MA750 has a lot going for it – a lush and warm sound, spacious presentation, and good bass presence. No less important is the construction quality, which features stainless steel housings and thick cabling. The earphones are comfortable, too, thanks in large part to the over-the-ear fit and molded earhooks, and isolate surprisingly well. Most impressively, the MA750 is not at all exorbitantly-priced – it’s extremely comfortable just north of $100. Early last year I found myself impressed with the entry-level MA350 and hoped to see more great things from RHA, and this year starts off with another hit from the Scottish manufacturer.

 

Pros: Extremely solid build quality; 3 year warranty; warm sound with excellent bass presence

Cons: Housings a bit on the heavy side

 

 

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by modulor View Post
 

Joker, any plans/interests in checking out the HM700 + RE-400B combo?  Initial impressions seem good so far.  Even if the player itself is kind of basic and limited in features it apparently was tuned specifically with the RE-400 in mind and reportedly has a good amp section to drive the included balanced version.  I thought being a fan of the RE-400 it may be on your radar :cool: 

 

 

To be honest I hadn't heard of it until now. I still haven't been convinced that going balanced is worth it with IEMs, but it's certainly interesting if it improves the RE-400. I do use my RE-600 balanced with the HM-901 every once in a while - it's an excellent combination. 

post #12680 of 16803
Hey joker: Nice review and comparisons....... Would you be able to find out the actual diameter of the dynamic drivers? All the rha model doesnt carry that info and just wondering whats the secrecy in that very basic info. I even enquired about this already with our fellow mate mark2410 as he reviewed a rha iem and he even didnt have a clue about it.........just like how b**e reveals external dimensions as tech specs for their cubes and AM bass modules.biggrin.gif
Edited by Shawn71 - 1/20/14 at 10:31pm
post #12681 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

The overall ranking has been updated here.

I see you've been changing some scores to accommodate the newer additions on the list.

It's a bit surprising to see that you've finally rated the ety er4s at least as high as its twfk competitors although I've got to ask what made you change your mind? 

post #12682 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post
 

To be honest I hadn't heard of it until now. I still haven't been convinced that going balanced is worth it with IEMs, but it's certainly interesting if it improves the RE-400. I do use my RE-600 balanced with the HM-901 every once in a while - it's an excellent combination. 

 

I'll just leave this quote ....here :normal_smile :

Quote:
Originally Posted by ClieOS View Post
 

 

You can always sell the RE400B as BNIB item.

 

Actually I have heard both RE400 and RE600 on HM700, you will be surprised how well tuned RE400 is on HM700 and actually RE600 might be the one get sold.

 
post #12683 of 16803
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn71 View Post

Hey joker: Nice review and comparisons....... Would you be able to find out the actual diameter of the dynamic drivers? All the rha model doesnt carry that info and just wondering whats the secrecy in that very basic info. I even enquired about this already with our fellow mate mark2410 as he reviewed a rha iem and he even didnt have a clue about it.........just like how b**e reveals external dimensions as tech specs for their cubes and AM bass modules.biggrin.gif

 

It never occurred to me to ask - I can't really learn anything about an earphone from its driver diameter.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kova4a View Post
 

I see you've been changing some scores to accommodate the newer additions on the list.

It's a bit surprising to see that you've finally rated the ety er4s at least as high as its twfk competitors although I've got to ask what made you change your mind? 

 

That probably happened when the JH13 was added and everything else got bumped down. In any case I still use the ER4 all the time for comparisons so I may have felt it needed a bump against things occupying the lower 9.x range these days.

post #12684 of 16803
Quote:
 

If you’re okay with headphones I have no reason not to recommend the CAL!. It’s not very portable but it’s a great headphone with a warm, impactful sound. Don’t like comparing headphones to IEMs though.

 

 

Yeah, i understand that, but since you have  larger experience, in terms of sond signature you can undoubtedly give a good opinion/advice. And in terms on IEM's, anything new worth to take a look in par of the M3 or Cw31's?

 

Off-topic:In your opinion does the Cal 2 have a "worse" bass than cal 1? I've seen ppl here on forum  saying it has bigger soundstage, more confy, but some say the sound is not as good as...


Edited by Johnny2ears - 1/21/14 at 11:03am
post #12685 of 16803

Really intrigued by the InEar StageDiver 2... But from reading various reviews and impressions, there are comments regarding a warm sound and possibly a "veil." Should I take this to mean its sound signature is more like the Westone house sound than for example Etymotic or Vsonic? 

 

Thanks! 

post #12686 of 16803

I’m on the hunt for a pair of earphones that I can finally settle with for a long time. I’ve been through a bunch of different ones over the past 5 years, and I end up tiring of each of them. It’s exhausting and frustrating.

 

For a long time I was using Sansa players (Fuze and Clip+), but recently I’ve been using a FiiO X3, which I like better than the Sansa players.

 

I’m thinking that if I describe which earphones I’ve been through and what I didn’t like about them, perhaps folks here that have experience with some of these may be able to point me to a particular pair that might suit me.

 

Brainwavz M2: I found these to be decent and stuck with them for a while, but eventually was dissatisfied with the separation (seemed congested), timbre, and imaging. Perhaps my biggest problem with them, however, was the dimensionality of the instruments: everything seemed two-dimensional. This led to a perception of “fakeness,” and I didn’t find them to be sufficiently natural-sounding.

 

HiFiMAN RE-0: These did not stay with me very long. I fully appreciated the clarity and precision, but they were much too bright, analytical, and thin-sounding for my taste.

 

Meelectronics CC-51: These were the first ones that I really thought were going to stick around. Punchiness was excellent, and bass, clarity, and detail were good. But I eventually got tired of them for two main reasons. First, they weren’t open enough. Instruments didn’t seem to have enough air around them. And second, because the way they positioned things just sounded off to me. If I were to use a concert analogy, it felt like I was sitting about 30 rows from the stage. This was particularly the case with the midrange. I don’t know if this was due to the way they soundstaged things, because the punchy bass seemed more forward/dominant than the midrange, or because of the deficiencies in the airiness/openness department, but whatever the reason, I found myself straining to listen to the midrange and eventually got rid of them.

 

Meelectronics A151: My first and only armature IEM. These stayed with me the least amount of time out of all of the IEMs I’ve tried. I really liked the midrange and intimacy, but it was too much midrange to the detriment of highs and bass. I came to view them as sounding like I was listening to an old transistor radio, even though the liquid and smooth midrange was attractive.

 

Philips SHE3590: These were the second ones that I really thought were going to stick around. They seemed pretty balanced to my ears. In addition, the lower mids seemed to deliver sufficient warmth when called up on but not in an overwhelming fashion like the Vsonic GR99’s (see below); the bass and lower mids seemed sufficient but also controlled. The positioning was also good: they were not too forward sounding like the JVC HA-FXT90’s (see below), not too distant sounding like the Meelec CC51’s, and not too laidback sounding like the HiFiMAN RE0’s. Eventually, though, I was dissatisfied with the resolution, dynamics, and space/air around the instruments. Important details were absent and they just didn’t deliver the energy necessary to realistically convey the punk/metal/indie rock that I like probably more than any other genres. Imaging was decent, but instruments didn’t have enough air/space around them, which also sapped some of the energy from the music. Sibilance and graininess were also slight issues, though not too bad; not nearly as bad as the JVC HA-FXT90’s.

 

Vsonic GR-99: These were a fun IEM. I was initially completely enraptured with these because they were so warm and smooth in the lower midrange. So much bass! And unlike the Meelec CC-51s, the mids were not pushed back too far in the soundstage. But eventually I desired more clarity. The bass is impressive tonally, but throws a veil over everything else. Ultimately, these were just too veiled and chesty for me, and I want something with more clarity. For what it’s worth, these mated better with my Sansa Clip+ than my Fii0 X3.

 

JVC HA-FXT90: These were the latest ones that I tried, and also the most expensive. When I first tried them, I was immediately impressed with the openness, airiness, timbre, separation, imaging, and clarity. They best most of the other IEM’s that I’ve tried in those areas. And the energy…wow!  None of the other IEMs that I’ve tried have conveyed the energy of the punk/metal/indie rock music that I like as convincingly. But as much as I liked those qualities, these JVC’s are just too aggressive and bright. Unlike any other IEM I’ve had, I actually find myself being fatigued by these. I can only listen to them in small time periods, and some days my ears/brain just can’t handle them at all. They are also grainier and more revealing of sibilance than any other IEM that I’ve had, to the point of being distracting sometimes. I love the clarity of the JVC’s and hearing them clearly made me realize the inferiority of the Vsonic GR-99’s. But I also know that I want something with a bit more presence in the low end to warm up the sound when it requires it. Regarding the latter aspect, the Philips SHE3590’s come closest to getting this right; in comparison, the JVC’s do not do it enough and the Vsonic GR-99’s do it too much.

 

I think if I were to sum things up, I would say that I’m searching for something that mainly combines aspects of the Philips SHE3590 and the JVC HA-FXT90, with perhaps a bit of the Vsonic GR-99 thrown in. In other words, I want something that: A.) Has the overall sound signature and soundstage placement of the Philips; B.) The clarity, timbre, separation, and openness of the JVC’s; C.) Conveys energy better than the Philips and more like the JVC’s, but not as aggressively as the JVC’s so that I don’t get fatigued (in other words, a slightly more tamed version of the JVC in the energy department); and D.) Has a bit of the warmth and non-graininess of the Vsonic GR-99. On the latter, though, I want to stress “just a bit” because the Vsonic's have way too much. In fact, the Philips may have enough of that warmth, though I wouldn’t mind just a tad more if possible. I can also deal with a small amount of graininess/sibilance like the Philips has (the JVC’s have way too much), but I do like the non-graininess of the Vsonic’s.

 

My budget is a maximum of $150.

 

Thanks for any advice/insight!

 

Btw, if this is "too much" of a post for this thread, let me know and I will edit this post and start my own thread on the matter instead.


Edited by steelglam - 1/21/14 at 7:36am
post #12687 of 16803

Would love to see a ranking on the Xiaomi Piston 2.0 gold version. It's a $20 gem that I enjoy more than the RE-400.

post #12688 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by steelglam View Post
 

I’m on the hunt for a pair of earphones that I can finally settle with for a long time. I’ve been through a bunch of different ones over the past 5 years, and I end up tiring of each of them. It’s exhausting and frustrating.

 

For a long time I was using Sansa players (Fuze and Clip+), but recently I’ve been using a FiiO X3, which I like better than the Sansa players.

 

I’m thinking that if I describe which earphones I’ve been through and what I didn’t like about them, perhaps folks here that have experience with some of these may be able to point me to a particular pair that might suit me.

 

Brainwavz M2: I found these to be decent and stuck with them for a while, but eventually was dissatisfied with the separation (seemed congested), timbre, and imaging. Perhaps my biggest problem with them, however, was the dimensionality of the instruments: everything seemed two-dimensional. This led to a perception of “fakeness,” and I didn’t find them to be sufficiently natural-sounding.

 

HiFiMAN RE-0: These did not stay with me very long. I fully appreciated the clarity and precision, but they were much too bright, analytical, and thin-sounding for my taste.

 

Meelectronics CC-51: These were the first ones that I really thought were going to stick around. Punchiness was excellent, and bass, clarity, and detail were good. But I eventually got tired of them for two main reasons. First, they weren’t open enough. Instruments didn’t seem to have enough air around them. And second, because the way they positioned things just sounded off to me. If I were to use a concert analogy, it felt like I was sitting about 30 rows from the stage. This was particularly the case with the midrange. I don’t know if this was due to the way they soundstaged things, because the punchy bass seemed more forward/dominant than the midrange, or because of the deficiencies in the airiness/openness department, but whatever the reason, I found myself straining to listen to the midrange and eventually got rid of them.

 

Meelectronics A151: My first and only armature IEM. These stayed with me the least amount of time out of all of the IEMs I’ve tried. I really liked the midrange and intimacy, but it was too much midrange to the detriment of highs and bass. I came to view them as sounding like I was listening to an old transistor radio, even though the liquid and smooth midrange was attractive.

 

Philips SHE3590: These were the second ones that I really thought were going to stick around. They seemed pretty balanced to my ears. In addition, the lower mids seemed to deliver sufficient warmth when called up on but not in an overwhelming fashion like the Vsonic GR99’s (see below); the bass and lower mids seemed sufficient but also controlled. The positioning was also good: they were not too forward sounding like the JVC HA-FXT90’s (see below), not too distant sounding like the Meelec CC51’s, and not too laidback sounding like the HiFiMAN RE0’s. Eventually, though, I was dissatisfied with the resolution, dynamics, and space/air around the instruments. Important details were absent and they just didn’t deliver the energy necessary to realistically convey the punk/metal/indie rock that I like probably more than any other genres. Imaging was decent, but instruments didn’t have enough air/space around them, which also sapped some of the energy from the music. Sibilance and graininess were also slight issues, though not too bad; not nearly as bad as the JVC HA-FXT90’s.

 

Vsonic GR-99: These were a fun IEM. I was initially completely enraptured with these because they were so warm and smooth in the lower midrange. So much bass! And unlike the Meelec CC-51s, the mids were not pushed back too far in the soundstage. But eventually I desired more clarity. The bass is impressive tonally, but throws a veil over everything else. Ultimately, these were just too veiled and chesty for me, and I want something with more clarity. For what it’s worth, these mated better with my Sansa Clip+ than my Fii0 X3.

 

JVC HA-FXT90: These were the latest ones that I tried, and also the most expensive. When I first tried them, I was immediately impressed with the openness, airiness, timbre, separation, imaging, and clarity. They best most of the other IEM’s that I’ve tried in those areas. And the energy…wow!  None of the other IEMs that I’ve tried have conveyed the energy of the punk/metal/indie rock music that I like as convincingly. But as much as I liked those qualities, these JVC’s are just too aggressive and bright. Unlike any other IEM I’ve had, I actually find myself being fatigued by these. I can only listen to them in small time periods, and some days my ears/brain just can’t handle them at all. They are also grainier and more revealing of sibilance than any other IEM that I’ve had, to the point of being distracting sometimes. I love the clarity of the JVC’s and hearing them clearly made me realize the inferiority of the Vsonic GR-99’s. But I also know that I want something with a bit more presence in the low end to warm up the sound when it requires it. Regarding the latter aspect, the Philips SHE3590’s come closest to getting this right; in comparison, the JVC’s do not do it enough and the Vsonic GR-99’s do it too much.

 

I think if I were to sum things up, I would say that I’m searching for something that mainly combines aspects of the Philips SHE3590 and the JVC HA-FXT90, with perhaps a bit of the Vsonic GR-99 thrown in. In other words, I want something that: A.) Has the overall sound signature and soundstage placement of the Philips; B.) The clarity, timbre, separation, and openness of the JVC’s; C.) Conveys energy better than the Philips and more like the JVC’s, but not as aggressively as the JVC’s so that I don’t get fatigued (in other words, a slightly more tamed version of the JVC in the energy department); and D.) Has a bit of the warmth and non-graininess of the Vsonic GR-99. On the latter, though, I want to stress “just a bit” because the Vsonic's have way too much. In fact, the Philips may have enough of that warmth, though I wouldn’t mind just a tad more if possible. I can also deal with a small amount of graininess/sibilance like the Philips has (the JVC’s have way too much), but I do like the non-graininess of the Vsonic’s.

 

My budget is a maximum of $150.

 

Thanks for any advice/insight!

 

Btw, if this is "too much" of a post for this thread, let me know and I will edit this post and start my own thread on the matter instead.


I Think that i'm now in a very similar situation as yours, and it does sound like we are after almost the same thing!

Some of my IEMs sound very clear but too thin and harsh, others just dont have enough resolution.

After reading a lot here, i can tell that i'm planning on the Yamaha EPH-100 for a long time now.

post #12689 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

To be honest I hadn't heard of it until now. I still haven't been convinced that going balanced is worth it with IEMs, but it's certainly interesting if it improves the RE-400. I do use my RE-600 balanced with the HM-901 every once in a while - it's an excellent combination. 

I just found out about it the other day, but it's apparently already for sale (the bundle goes for $250) - I share the same sentiment about balanced output but I just like the fact that it's amp is purpose built for the RE-400 essentially (and to a lesser extend the RE-600), that being my overall favorite IEM to date.  If it does in fact improve upon them, it may very well end up in my collection haha.  It was also confirmed that it is capable of being Rockbox'd, assuming they have the desire to do so with this model.

post #12690 of 16803

Joker, I wonder if you can help me out.

 

I currently have a pair of Sony MH1C's and while I like the general warm, fun sound you get from these the cable and the fit of them especially while on the move means I'm in the market for a set of IEM's that can meet my needs better.

 

I need some IEM's that are comfortable for periods of extended use, so when riding a bike or walking or in noisier environments, so they need to not be microphonic but have fairly good isolation. I love the bass on the MH1C's, and the mids and highs have a fairly good balance, while the highs are never fatiguing. I mainly listen to Rock, Indie, Pop or easy listening music, so a warmer sound signature is preferable, with clear mids and highs. I'm a bit of a bass head in that I appreciate a full bodied bass that's tight and keeps you on your toes, immersed. I'm after a bit of a wider soundstage than the MH1C's can offer, too.

 

My budget is up to about $100-150 dollars. I'm in the market to invest in a medium-range set of headphones that will last me a LOT of use, so the build quality and sound have to be up to scratch.

 

Any ideas? I've been looking into the MEElectronics A161p but I'm not sure if there are better alternatives out there.

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