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Multi-IEM Review - 352 IEMs compared (Pump Audio Earphones added 04/03/16 p. 1106) - Page 786

post #11776 of 16803
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by egosumlux View Post
 

Nice review thank you very much, congrats for the 300 mark achieved. I would like to see your opinions on the NE600X as well

 

Thanks, much appreciated :beerchug:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LordZero View Post
 

Hi, I got the SteelSeries FLux In-Ear and also 3 pairs of comply T-100, because I was expecting that they used the same size as the Pro version,but I was wrong :\ Anyone know what is the size of Comply Foams they use?

 

The *200 and *400 Complys I have are loose. Shure Olives and Westone True-Fit Foams don't fit. Not sure about the rest.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ericr View Post


OK. I'll just be patient then. And hope maybe you'll get to the V6 Stage before the Black Friday sales. wink.gif

Very interested in the V6-s and you're one of the few who have also reviewed the SM64 (which I'm really enjoying).


It'll be done before black Friday. I'd give it a month at most. 

post #11777 of 16803
smily_headphones1.gif
post #11778 of 16803

Something happened to my Sparks.

whenever i twist the 3.5mm plug just a little, it pauses the music.

i was wondering what's causing this popular issue.

what could go wrong with a 3.5mm plug??

post #11779 of 16803

If it loses connection a phone should recognize it as the connector being disconnected = pause the music. Maybe that's the problem.

post #11780 of 16803

I think your 300th review should be the custom from Noble Audio :)

 

With all these iems along with what you haven't reviewed it's a wonder how you don't lose your iems and start wondering where things are.

post #11781 of 16803

First world problems...

post #11782 of 16803
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonYeol View Post
 

If it loses connection a phone should recognize it as the connector being disconnected = pause the music. Maybe that's the problem.

 

Or it recognizes a button press when there is none, which a phone or iPod would interpret as a pause command. Could be a connection problem with the plug or a short somewhere in the mic/remote lead near the plug

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rawrster View Post
 

I think your 300th review should be the custom from Noble Audio :)

 

I haven't had the Noble long enough yet, but I'm really liking what I'm hearing so far.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rawrster View Post
 

With all these iems along with what you haven't reviewed it's a wonder how you don't lose your iems and start wondering where things are.

 

When I was reviewing the SM64 I had to go and find my Ultrasone IQ, which I hadn't used in months. I completely forgot that I'd put it in a generic carrying case because the one that came with it was unwieldy. Took me a few days to find. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by n0str3ss View Post
 

First world problems...

 

First-world Head-Fier problems ;) 

post #11783 of 16803
Thread Starter 

Added the JH Audio JH13 Pro Freqphase at #300. This centennial marks a new sound quality benchmark :etysmile:.

 

Thank you all for your support in reaching this milestone - it could not have been reached without all of your feedback, discussion, and encouragement!

 

Quote:
 

(1A11) JH Audio JH13 Pro Freqphase

 

Added Oct 2013

 

Details: One of the flagship models from Florida-based CIEM experts JH Audio

Current Price: $1099 from jhaudio.comsmartphone cable with mic and 1-button remote available for $54.95

Specs: Driver: 6 BA / 3-way crossover | Imp: 28Ω | Sens: 116 dB | Freq: 10-20k Hz | Cable: 4’ L-plug / other lengths available

Wear Style: Over-the-ear

 

Accessories (4.5/5) – Cleaning tool, Comply Soft Wraps, Otterbox 1000 hard-shell carrying case, and drawstring carrying pouch

Build Quality (5/5) – The JH13 boasts fantastic fit and finish all around, with crystal-clear shells and faceplates. The cables use the common 2-pin connector. Numerous customization options are available for the earphones via the JH Audio website

Isolation (4.5/5) - The isolation provided by the custom shells is excellent - slightly below that of silicone-shelled customs but on-par with my UM and Hidition units

Microphonics (5/5) – No cable noise to speak of

Comfort (5/5) – The nozzles of my JH13 were cut a bit longer than average, similar to the UM Miracle. As with all acrylic customs, the shells are hard but very comfortable when fitted correctly. If the earphones are uncomfortable after an initial break-in period, a refit is probably a good idea. JH Audio does refits at no cost within the first 30 days and for $50 thereafter

 

Sound (10/10) – A staple of the audiophile scene since its release in 2009, the JH Audio JH13 Pro underwent an update dubbed “Freqphase” last year. Both the JH13 and the bassier JH16 are currently shipping with the Freqphase tweak, which is meant to ensure phase coherency between the drivers by delivering all frequencies to the ear at once. Regardless of the technical details, the JH13 Pro sounds absolutely fantastic to me. It is tight, balanced, and impossibly clear. The bass is quick and extended, with a few decibels of boost and the ability to produce a good amount of punch when necessary. The JH13 can sound lean and quick one moment, and crank out beats with some serious authority the next. Its tone is, on the whole, a bit warmer than that of the Etymotic Research ER4S, but still close to neutral.

 

Great dynamics and transparency carry over to all aspects of its sound – in addition to good bass control, the JH13 boasts unbelievable clarity and resolution. The mids are in balance with the bass and expose every nuance of the recording with great definition. The sound is, on the whole, a little fuller and more natural compared to the Etymotic ER4S without sacrificing any clarity whatsoever. Comparing the JH13 to the quad-armature Ultimate Ears UE900, for example, makes the UE set sound muffled, thanks in part to its recessed upper midrange and slightly boomier bass.

 

The treble of the JH13 is nicely prominent but not at all harsh or sibilant. Treble energy is spot-on, appearing about even with the Etymotic ER4S while doing a similarly good job of minimizing harshness and sibilance. Westone’s flagship custom monitor, the ES5, sounds a little dark in comparison to the JH13 and appears a touch more congested. The JH13, on the other hand, sounds airy and has superb instrument separation and stereo imaging. Is presentation has much better depth than that of the Ety ER4S and an airier, more open feel than that of the UE900. The sum sound is crisp and accurate without missing out on the enjoyment factor, especially for those who don’t need tons of bass boost to tap their toes.

 

Select comparisons

 

VSonic GR07 ($179)

 

VSonic’s dynamic-driver flagship is an order of magnitude less expensive than the JH13 but, as one of the more capable earphones in its price range, makes for an interesting comparison. The most obvious difference between the two lies in the bass – the GR07 has a softer bass presentation that lacks the speed, tightness, and texture of the JH13’s low end. Overall bass quantity is similar between the two earphones but because it lacks the bass control, as well as the more forward midrange, of the JH13, the GR07 sounds boomier in comparison and its low end appears heavier and more intrusive.

 

The midrange of the GR07 is not as prominent as that of the JH13 and lacks some clarity in comparison. The treble of the VSonics tends to be hotter and vocals generally appear more sibilant. The JH13 sounds significantly smoother, but not for lack of energy. Rather, it follows a treble profile more like that of the Etymotic ER4S, avoiding the peaks that can make the GR07 offensive while maintaining similar overall treble presence. The JH13 also has a more three-dimensional presentation with better depth compared to the VSonic set.

 

HiFiMan RE-600 ($399)

 

One of the few accuracy-oriented dynamic-driver earphones in its price range, the RE-600, much like its lower-priced RE-400 sibling, is an impressive performer when it comes to delivering accurate, yet smooth sound. The biggest difference between the RE-600 and JH13 is the treble – the HiFiMan set sounds dull and lacks treble presence in comparison. Its tone is a little warmer overall and there is a touch more bass bleed and less clarity than with the armature-based JH13. The JH13, due in large part to its tighter bass and superior treble presence, appears a little more detailed and textured, and boasts a more spacious and airy presentation with better imaging.

 

Unique Melody Miracle ($950)

 

Unique Melody’s flagship is one of my favorite custom-fit earphones and the standard against which I’ve compared all other monitors for the past several years. Its 3-way, 6-driver configuration and balanced, spacious sound make it a natural competitor for the JH13, but on closer inspection the two earphones are as different as they are similar. The bass of the Miracle is rather level whereas the JH13 has its low end boosted by a few decibels. This is especially noticeable in the mid-bass region and gives the JH13 greater overall bass impact. It also makes the Miracle seem more focused on deep bass in comparison as there’s no mid-bass boost to get in the way. Nonetheless, the punchier JH13 still sounds a touch more resolving than the Miracle.

 

The JH13 boasts more midrange presence and clarity while the UM set has more recessed mids that end up sounding a bit veiled in comparison. At the top, the Miracle is a little smoother, but otherwise similar in both treble energy and top-end extension. The presentation of the JH13 is, on the whole, more forward but both earphones provide a great sense of space and have excellent imaging.

 

Sensaphonics 3MAX ($1050)

 

Sensaphonics’ flagship earphone is a pro-oriented monitor with good bass, a mild midrange focus and smooth, inoffensive treble. The JH13 boasts similarly ample bass impact on tracks that call for it but also has greater ability to scale back, providing tighter, quicker, less intrusive bass when necessary. It is brighter, clearer, and more detailed than the 3MAX, revealing fine musical nuances more readily and sounding more refined overall. The JH13 also has better treble energy and sounds more crisp. It is more spacious as well, with a soundstage that boasts better width and depth in comparison to the 3MAX.

 

Hidition NT 6 ($1200)

 

The 4-way, 6-driver NT 6 is less bassy than its pricier NT6-Pro sibling, just as the JH13 Pro is less bottom-heavy than the pricier JH16. The similarities between them run deeper, however. For me, both of these monitors are the cream of the crop – impossibly clear and resolving, with very good imaging and lifelike presentations. The differences between them lie largely in sound signature, with the JH13 being a pinch on the warm side of neutral and the NT 6 being slightly bright.

 

While the low end of the NT 6 is extended, punchy, and dynamic, it doesn’t crank out bass with quite the same authority and impact as the JH13. Personally, I don’t find the low end of the JH13 excessive, but the bass of the Hidition is flatter in profile and a little tighter as a result. The more mid-bassy JH13 carries a slightly warmer tone, though the mids on both earphones are completely free of veiling and fantastically clear. The NT 6 is brighter, with more emphasis on high frequencies, while the JH13 is a little flatter up top. On the soundstage front, the JH13 sounds a little more 3-dimensional and enveloping while the NT 6 has slightly less depth to it. Interestingly, the JH13 Pro is also significantly more sensitive than the NT 6.

 

FitEar To Go! 334 ($1345)

 

One of priciest and most exclusive universal-fit earphones in the world, the Japan-made TG334 utilizes a quad-armature configuration to deliver a warm and powerful sound with smooth, relaxed treble. It sounds quite different from the accuracy-oriented JH13 – significantly bassier and darker in tone. The JH13, with its tighter, less powerful low end, makes the TG334 sound quite muddy in comparison. The mids of the TG334 also appear somewhat muffled next to the JH13, with the JH Audio set offering up better treble presence and superior overall balance as well. On the presentation front the two are more similar, but the TG334 is slightly less coherent-sounding than the JH13.

 

Value (9.5/10) – The IEM market has changed a lot in the past several years, becoming saturated at an increasing rate. Still, of all of the earphones I’ve tried recently, the JH Audio JH13 Pro has been the biggest eye-opener, delivering clarity and resolution unlike anything else I’ve heard. It effortlessly produces extremely nuanced and refined sound across the entire frequency range, complete with fantastic instrument separation and imaging.

 

I do believe that the best Hi-Fi component is one that does its job so well, you don’t even know it’s there, and after a year spent with the JH13 Pro I still marvel most at its ability to simply fade away, leaving only the music. In fact, finding anything that mildly displeases me about this earphone is a struggle, but one I really don’t mind.

 

Pros: Class-leading sound quality; great fit & finish

Cons: N/A

 

The JH13 sits atop the comparison table, the sortable version of which can be found here.


Edited by ljokerl - 10/17/13 at 11:49pm
post #11784 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post  ...after a year spent with the JH13 Pro I still marvel most at its ability to simply fade away, leaving only the music.

 

Having heard the demo, it makes sense that you'd find it to at the top of your heap. Personally, I found that it forced me to listen to the music, and I couldn't tune out. It was a bit disconcerting in that sense, similar to how I found the 1Plus2. However, I am very, very impressed by its technical ability --- I'm not thrilled by the 6k spike and I'd like the bass shelf about 2.5 dB lower, but I can definitely understand why so many are so enamored with this monitor.

post #11785 of 16803
Great review!! Makes the 13s just that much more tempting!

And thank you for bringing so much guidance to this community wink.gif
Edited by Cotnijoe - 10/18/13 at 12:06am
post #11786 of 16803

Three freaking hundred!  CoNgRaTuLaTiOnS!

 

You have my greatest respect and sincere appreciation.

 

Thank-you Joker!

post #11787 of 16803
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericr View Post
 

Three freaking hundred!  CoNgRaTuLaTiOnS!

 

You have my greatest respect and sincere appreciation.

 

Thank-you Joker!

+300 :beerchug:

post #11788 of 16803

Congratulations on your 300th review!!! Your are definitely THE best headphone/iem reviewer out there. I hope your planning on taking a long vacation or something  because you definitely deserve one.:beerchug:

post #11789 of 16803

Congrats on the 300th!

post #11790 of 16803
And congratulations from me joker. I'm still waiting for the review of the Custom Art Music One:D
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