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Multi-IEM Review - 328 IEMs compared (Lear LUF-4F / LUF-4B / LUF-4C added 11/07/14 p. 994) - Page 655

post #9811 of 15085

thx for answers, ordered Fischer Audio DBA-02 mkII with LineaRossa W1 (got nice discount).

post #9812 of 15085
Quote:
Originally Posted by Impulse View Post


http://www.innerfidelity.com/content/great-motorcycling-headphones-jays-q-jays-and-etymotic-er6i

I'm not sure if the ER6i is still made but I figured the link would be of interest anyway, if you haven't read it.

 

Thanks! Great read. Now if I can only find a used ER6i...

post #9813 of 15085
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by livejamie View Post

Anybody know how the Soul SL99s are? I was looking at them or the vPulse IEMs.

 

Never tried the SL99. The vPulse is quite good for what it is. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by geko95gek View Post

Dunu Trident vs. SoundMagic E10 for trance music?? cool.gif

 

Depends on whether you like warmer (Trident) or slightly more v-shaped (Soundmagic). Personally I would go for the E10 since I like its treble better and generally prefer a more v-shaped signature for electronic music. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TR3v View Post

I bought the Logitech Ultimate Ears 500 based on these reviews. They are a great value on amazon.com right now for 33 dollars. I got them for 28. They have just enough sound quality for me to enjoy music without wishing I was using better headphones. They sound better than my old shure e2cs, much better bass. Now

 

Good price, no doubt. Very competent earphones. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCabDaddy View Post

Seeking out what might prove a kind of unique recommendation for an unusual situation: I'm looking for IEMs to use inside a motorcycle helmet. Two things I know I'll need is NON isolation and a flat profile. Also prefer if they'll drive off an iPhone 4s and/or Nano without amplification, so that means efficiency since I'll be using higher than usual volumes.

 

The sound signature I generally prefer tends towards warmth. I've found that riding usually masks bass to mids. Not sure though whether that should be deal with that situation through the IEM or through eq. Kind of leading towards EQ so I find the IEMs listenable when not riding.

 

Music ranges from Americana to jazz/blues to funk.

 

I'd like to keep the price < $100 and I don't mind buying used. I'll exceed $100 if need be. 

 

Most of the IEMs that fit deep inside the canal (i.e. have a lower profile) tend to also isolate more. One way to go might be an ergo-fit IEM that would be housed mostly in the outer ear. A few that come to mind that don't isolate super well are the MEElec M6 (most bass, medium isolation), Soundmagic E30 (less bass, lowest isolation), and Soundmagic PL50 (not much bass, low isolation)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCabDaddy View Post

 

Thanks! Great read. Now if I can only find a used ER6i...


The ER6i actually isolates quite well, like all Etys, and isn't warm-sounding at all. It would make sense to do one or the other - either high isolation (which reduces the bass loss) and a more balanced sound or a bassy IEM that doesn't isolate much. It's clear that Tyll (of InnerFidelity) prefers the first way. 

post #9814 of 15085
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCabDaddy View Post

Seeking out what might prove a kind of unique recommendation for an unusual situation: I'm looking for IEMs to use inside a motorcycle helmet. Two things I know I'll need is NON isolation and a flat profile. Also prefer if they'll drive off an iPhone 4s and/or Nano without amplification, so that means efficiency since I'll be using higher than usual volumes.

 

The sound signature I generally prefer tends towards warmth. I've found that riding usually masks bass to mids. Not sure though whether that should be deal with that situation through the IEM or through eq. Kind of leading towards EQ so I find the IEMs listenable when not riding.

 

Music ranges from Americana to jazz/blues to funk.

 

I'd like to keep the price < $100 and I don't mind buying used. I'll exceed $100 if need be. 

 

My experience with the $10 SHE3580/3590/3500 leads me to believe they have just the right amount of "non-isolation" for your needs as they have a small port between the driver and the eartip that serves the triple purpose of leaking sound in, preventing a total vacuum seal and creating a more open sound.  They also happen to be very low profile.  I've been annoyed by their relative lack of isolation while riding transit and walking the busy streets of Hong Kong but that makes them sound like just the right ticket for you! etysmile.gif

 

There's also the SHE3575/3595 models which add a mic and button, should you find that useful smily_headphones1.gif


Edited by Joe Bloggs - 3/22/13 at 10:42pm
post #9815 of 15085

What would be the next logical step after Ultimate Ears 700 and Brainwavz B2? Maybe Ultimate Ears 900?

 

I like them both but I'm little concerned about the build quality of Logitech/UE, since UE700 cable is about to crack soon :/

post #9816 of 15085
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziilot View Post

What would be the next logical step after Ultimate Ears 700 and Brainwavz B2? Maybe Ultimate Ears 900?

 

I like them both but I'm little concerned about the build quality of Logitech/UE, since UE700 cable is about to crack soon :/


I'm not a fan of that UE cable either. The UE900 uses a different one, thankfully. In terms of sound, it'll have more bass than the 700, including depth and impact, better imaging, and smother treble, but if you like the brighter sound of the UE700 you may not enjoy it as much.

post #9817 of 15085
Thread Starter 

Added two old Sennheisers - CX980 and IE7

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

(2A29) Sennheiser CX980
 

Added Mar 2013


Details: One of several Sennheiser earphones developed in collaboration with BMW Designworks
Current Price: $245 from amazon.com (MSRP: $259.95)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 32Ω | Sens: 115 dB | Freq: 16-24k Hz | Cable: 3.9' rotating plug
Nozzle Size: 4mm | Preferred tips: Rock-It R-20/MEElec A151 single-flanges
Wear Style: Straight down

Accessories (5/5) - Single-flange “balanced sound” silicone tips (3 sizes), single-flange “enhanced bass” silicone tips (3 sizes), foam tips, cleaning tool, replacement nozzle filters (2 pairs), shirt clip, airplane adapter, soft carrying pouch, and carrying case with integrated cable winder
Build Quality (4/5) – Engineered in collaboration with BMW Designworks, the CX980 is a striking combination of metal and plastic. The housings have a solid, hefty feel due to the metal stems but are otherwise plastic like those of the other, much cheaper CX-series earphones. The nozzle filters are just cylinders of foam and the cables are thinner compared to Sennheiser’s IE-series models. An in-line analog volume control is mounted at the y-split and the metal 3.5mm plug rotates between 90- and 180-degree configurations
Isolation (3.5/5) – Good due to compact, well-sealing housings and angled nozzles
Microphonics (3.5/5) – Cable noise is tolerable but the CX980 housings are difficult to wear over-the-ear due to the long stems
Comfort (4.5/5) – Despite the heft of the metal housings and volume control, the CX980 is quite comfortable to wear with its thin, angled nozzles, smooth housings, and angled cable entry. My only real gripe is that it is difficult to wear over the ear

Sound (8.1/10) – The CX980 follows the usual Sennheiser CX-series formula, delivering warm sound with generous bass but missing out on some of the clarity and refinement of more fidelity-oriented earphones. The bass of the CX980 is rather heavy – slightly greater in quantity than that of Sennheiser’s IE6 model and more in line with the Brainwavz M5. Bass control is rather good considering the sheer weight of it – the CX980 doesn’t sound overly flabby for such a bassy earphone. It is more controlled, for example, than the Audio-Technica CKM500, which has a more pronounced mid-bass hump. Bass depth is also good – the earphones produce a nice rumble down at the lowest frequencies.

The midrange of the CX980 is not as forward as that of the IE6 and the bass clouds over the mids slightly. The result is mild midrange veiling and a slight clarity deficiency even in comparison to cheaper sets such as the VSonic GR06. Tonally, the CX980 is on the warm side. Treble extension and quality are good but there’s not enough top end presence to counteract the heavy bass. On the upside, the top end is very smooth, with no discernible grain, and sounds quite natural compared to many lower-end sets.

The presentation of the CX980 is again typical of a Sennheiser CX-series in-ear – not overly congested but far from spacious as a result of the somewhat laid-back treble. The overall sound is rather in-the-head, especially when compared to sets such as the VSonic GR06 and Sennheiser’s own IE-series earphones. Interestingly, the CX980 doesn’t seem to be as sensitive as indicated in the specifications – through all my listening it required more power than the competition.

When all is said and done, the CX980 is highly reminiscent of the $40 Brainwavz M5, boasting all similar shortcomings, albeit to a less severe degree. The CX980 is not quite as bassy as the M5, but otherwise shares a similar signature. Treble quality and extension are better on the CX980, but treble energy is still not as great as I would like. Clarity and detail, likewise, are slightly better on the CX980, and soundstage is a little more spacious. The difference between the two sets is clearly audible, and yet not as great as it should be considering the price gap.

Value (6.5/10) – The BMW-designed Sennheiser CX980 accomplishes a rare feat for an in-ear monitor – its metal accents look stylish, but not ostentatious. Sadly, the low-grade plastics don’t have quite give it the same refinement up close and the long stems prevent over-the-ear wear. It is still very comfortable when worn cord-down, however, and has the sound of a good consumer-class earphone, with plentiful bass and smooth treble. Unfortunately, though the bass is rather well-controlled, the overall sound is too slanted towards the low end and lacks the clarity of many other similarly-priced monitors, making the CX980 a difficult recommendation.

Pros: Comfortable form factor; striking design
Cons: Difficult to wear over-the-ear; bass emphasis takes away from overall sound


Big thanks to Anaxilus for the CX980 loan

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

(1C20) Sennheiser IE7
 

Added Mar 2013


Details: Previously popular model from Sennheiser’s original IE series
Current Price: N/A (discontinued) (MSRP: $299.95)
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 120 dB | Freq: 10-19k Hz | Cable: 4' L-plug
Nozzle Size: 5.5mm | Preferred tips: Stock short bi-flanges; MEElec balanced bi-flanges
Wear Style: Over-the-ear

Accessories (5/5) - Single flange (3 sizes) and bi-flange (3 sizes) silicone tips, foamhybrid tips (2 sizes), cleaning tool, over-the-ear cable guides, shirt clip, and storage case with integrated cable winder
Build Quality (4.5/5) - The housings are made of sturdy plastic and the kevlar-reinforced cable is light, smooth, and strong. It is not detachable like that of the pricier IE8 and the L-plug is not gold plated, so rotating it can cause a bit of static
Isolation (2.5/5) – As with the IE8, the IE7 is a shallow-fitting earphone with below-average isolation
Microphonics (5/5) – Pretty much nonexistent
Comfort (4/5) - The housings are large but lightweight and surprisingly ergonomic. They sit flush in the ear and are not overly sensitive to insertion depth, so the IE7 should be comfortable for all but those with small outer ears

Sound (8.2/10) – Part of Sennheiser’s original IE-series lineup, the IE7 provides a somewhat different sound signature than the more bass-heavy IE6 and IE8. The sound of the IE7 is more mid-focused, though bass is still plentiful. The low end is both impactful and full-bodied, and bass power should be ample for all but die-hard bass fans. Control is a bit disappointing, however – the IE7 suffers from a mid-bass lift and its low end is neither as tight not as quick as those of more modern dynamic-driver designs. The Monster Miles Davis Trumpet, for example, makes the IE7 sound boomy and bloated in comparison and offers up better detail and texturing throughout. The Atrio MG7, too, easily beats the IE7 not only in bass depth but also control, and the JVC HA-FX500 has a flatter, more realistic low end that causes it to sound more even-handed and natural compared to the IE7.

The midrange of the IE7 is warm, yet forward - those who find the IE8 veiled and recessed in the midrange would probably enjoy the IE7 more. The earphone sounds lush and smooth but lacks the detail of most BA-based and many dynamic-driver sets in its price range - the mids simply don’t have the best definition, especially down where the bass bleeds over. The JVC HA-FXT90 and Yamaha EPH-100 are two lower-priced dynamic driver earphones that have cleaner-sounding mids compared to the IE7.

The treble of the IE7 has good presence but isn’t very refined, lacking the delicacy, effortlessness, and detail of sets such as the HiFiMan RE-ZERO and Sony EX600. It can be a little edgy but doesn’t have a whole lot of sparkle and liveliness. The presentation, too, impresses with its spaciousness but boasts only average separation. The IE7 maintains the excellent soundstage and headstage size of the higher-end IE8 model. It sounds more expansive than competing sets such as the Monster Miles Davis Trumpets and even the open-backed JVC HA-FX500, but doesn’t have the imaging to compete with even the cheaper Yamaha EPH-100. The Sony EX600, which has a similarly large presentation, sounds cleaner and less congested, with more convincing layering and a coherent, versatile presentation.

Value (6.5/10) – Sennheiser’s now-defunct IE7 is a unique earphone – with a mid-forward signature, large headstage, and powerful bass, it would have a place on the market today were it not for the somewhat disappointing clarity and resulting lack of refinement. Like the higher-end IE8, the IE7 does not offer much isolation but boasts good ergonomics and an excellent cable, making it an easy earphone to use out and about. Its sound, too, works well on the go – it just isn’t as “Hi-Fi” as one might expect from an upper-tier Sennheiser product.

Pros: Excellent cabling, no microphonics, lightweight and comfortable, large soundstage
Cons: Mediocre isolation, lacks transparency and refinement

post #9818 of 15085
I need some help choosing my next IEM's.

Budget: under $200
Source: Clip+ and Galaxy Nexus, Fiio E6, Flac and 320mp3's
Music: R&B, Jazz, some Rock, Hip Hop
 
I currently have the RE-Zero's and love them, I feel they are great for about 70% of my music, the other 30% the bass on the Zero's falls short.  I use the Fiio E6 bass boost with the Zero's and I do feel it fills the gap and helps for most of my music.  I am hoping to find something where the amp's added bass is not needed.

I do like the mids and highs on the Zero's, so I am basically just looking for another IEM with similiar mids and highs but with the added low end.  I was hoping the RE-400 would meet me needs but from reviews it sounds like it may still not have enough bass for me (although it sounds like it does have more than the Zero's).
 
I have been considering the the GR07 BE's, but am open to other suggestions.
 

Thanks in advance for the help.

post #9819 of 15085

He finally added the IE7! eek.gif

 

Great reviews as always Joker. But, wow, if you're getting to the IE7, the TF10 review can't be far behind! tongue.gif

 

Kidding of course. (Or am I?)

post #9820 of 15085

Hey Joker, looks like a section of your thread is missing. Post #3 is blank :(

post #9821 of 15085

@Joker

Great that you finally reviewed the senn IE7. I  though their bass is great, at least compared to the yamaha eph-100 (better impact & texture).

Off course the yamaha eph-100 has better  clarity, but it's with the senn ie7 that I  learned true bass excitement.

Thinking they deserve a better rating.

post #9822 of 15085
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGame21x View Post

 

But, wow, if you're getting to the IE7, the TF10 review can't be far behind! tongue.gif

 

Coming to a browser near you on 13.13.13

post #9823 of 15085
Quote:
Originally Posted by esanthosh View Post

 

Coming to a browser near you on 13.13.13

 

post #9824 of 15085
Hi Joker,
 
Was hoping your opinion across the PFE232, CK100, UE900 and EX1000.
 
How would you rank them in terms of level of perceptible detail and bass extension, and would you recommend any other universals on those two fronts? Coming from the TF10s as an upgrade (and also because my aftermarket cables keep on breaking ...) so leaning towards the UE900s.
 
Much appreciated.
post #9825 of 15085
Quote:
Originally Posted by esanthosh View Post

 

Coming to a browser near you on 13.13.13

That sounds like pro wrestling to me.

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