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Multi-IEM Review - 325 IEMs compared (Nuforce NE-600X added 10/30/14 p. 990) - Page 990

post #14836 of 14850
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post
 

Posted a brief review of the Custom Art Harmony 8 Pro and Pro 330v2 models here: http://theheadphonelist.com/brief-impressions-custom-art-harmony-8-pro-pro-330-v2/ . Full write-ups to come later. 

 

Been waiting for the Harmony 8 Pro impressions! Its a shame there has been no comparisons between Harmony 8 and Harmony 8 Pro.

 

A comparison to the NT-6 would be nice, as both are treble extended. And a comparison to the only other silicone flagship, SE-5 Way would be good.


Edited by T.R.A.N.C.E. - 10/27/14 at 12:03am
post #14837 of 14850
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by T.R.A.N.C.E. View Post
 

 

Been waiting for the Harmony 8 Pro impressions! Its a shame there has been no comparisons between Harmony 8 and Harmony 8 Pro.

 

A comparison to the NT-6 would be nice, as both are treble extended. And a comparison to the only other silicone flagship, SE-5 Way would be good.

 

Don't have an SE 5-way but I'll definitely include an NT6 comparo in the final write-up. It has a brighter sound for sure - the Harmony 8 Pro is more neutral, like a UM Miracle. 

post #14838 of 14850

I just wanted to say, I don't think I've ever seen a thread as dedicated as this. Thank you so much |joker|! You've helped me out big time.

post #14839 of 14850
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

No plans to try these right now. 
ah well... They are the current big hype train in Chinese IEM's. Reviewers of them have said the piston 2 isn't as good as the KZ ED special edition. In fact, the KZ Hype train replaced the piston 2.
post #14840 of 14850
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post
 

 

Interesting question. There definitely are a couple - three that come to mind are the T-Peos H-100, JVC HA-FXD80, and Dunu DN-2000. 

 

 

DN-2000 would be my pick but it differs from the DN-1000 here and there. I compared them a little here: http://theheadphonelist.com/brief-review-dunu-dn-2000-fidue-a83-t-peos-altone200-sony-xba-h3-triple-driver-hybrids-compared/ . The DN-2000 is still a significantly better match for the DN-1000's signature than the Altone200.

 

Hi joker,

 

Picking up on a response that you made last week to an inquiry from another poster about an IEM that emphasized deep bass but has drier (not warm) mids, I have a somewhat related question. 

 

I recently picked up the Dunu DN-1000, and it's definitely come the closest yet to meeting what I am looking for in an IEM.  In particular, I like that the deep bass doesn't roll off excessively like a lot of midrange-focused IEMs, yet the mid-bass is also not overly warm and does not bleed too significantly into the other parts of the spectrum and throw a veil over everything.  I like that the mids are clear and clean, yet when deep bass is required in a particular track, it is there.  But my biggest complaint about the Dunu's are the highs.  They are often just a tad too sharp for my tastes.  Just a bit, though.  They're not nearly as bad in that department as others that I've tried (e.g., JVC HA-FXT90).  Tip and spacer rolling help (man are the Dunu's diverse!), and some combos get me to about 80+% of what I'm looking for, but none get it exactly right for my tastes.

 

As an interesting contrast, I like the Hifiman RE-400's, but for certain recordings that require a deep bass presence, the RE-400's just don't cut it, and the mids are warm such that some days I desire more clarity.  I think the Dunu's do both clarity and bass better than the Hifiman's.

 

So, my question to you: Is there an IEM that retails for $200 or less that basically has the sound characteristics of the Dunu DN-1000 with a bit less sharpness in the highs?  Most "neutral" headphones that I've listened to seem to roll off the deep bass, which I don't like.  If there are tones found in that region of the spectrum, I don't want them to be tapered.  I also like that despite being slightly v-shaped, the Dunu's deep bass never intrudes on the other parts of the spectrum, and the mids do not seem overly recessed or hollowed-out like some other v-shaped IEMs that I've heard.  But I don't mind a bit more tapering in the highs than what the Dunu offers.  I guess to sum it up, I'm looking for something that does not roll off the sub-bass frequencies, that is generally neutral and clear (i.e., not too warm) through the mid-bass and midrange, and that has good treble presence but slightly smoother than what the Dunu offers up top (so, I guess slightly less than neutral in the highs).

 

Anything come to mind?  Thanks in advance. 

post #14841 of 14850
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sevendeuce72 View Post
 

I just wanted to say, I don't think I've ever seen a thread as dedicated as this. Thank you so much |joker|! You've helped me out big time.

 

Glad the thread has been useful :beerchug:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by steelglam View Post
 

 

Hi joker,

 

Picking up on a response that you made last week to an inquiry from another poster about an IEM that emphasized deep bass but has drier (not warm) mids, I have a somewhat related question. 

 

I recently picked up the Dunu DN-1000, and it's definitely come the closest yet to meeting what I am looking for in an IEM.  In particular, I like that the deep bass doesn't roll off excessively like a lot of midrange-focused IEMs, yet the mid-bass is also not overly warm and does not bleed too significantly into the other parts of the spectrum and throw a veil over everything.  I like that the mids are clear and clean, yet when deep bass is required in a particular track, it is there.  But my biggest complaint about the Dunu's are the highs.  They are often just a tad too sharp for my tastes.  Just a bit, though.  They're not nearly as bad in that department as others that I've tried (e.g., JVC HA-FXT90).  Tip and spacer rolling help (man are the Dunu's diverse!), and some combos get me to about 80+% of what I'm looking for, but none get it exactly right for my tastes.

 

As an interesting contrast, I like the Hifiman RE-400's, but for certain recordings that require a deep bass presence, the RE-400's just don't cut it, and the mids are warm such that some days I desire more clarity.  I think the Dunu's do both clarity and bass better than the Hifiman's.

 

So, my question to you: Is there an IEM that retails for $200 or less that basically has the sound characteristics of the Dunu DN-1000 with a bit less sharpness in the highs?  Most "neutral" headphones that I've listened to seem to roll off the deep bass, which I don't like.  If there are tones found in that region of the spectrum, I don't want them to be tapered.  I also like that despite being slightly v-shaped, the Dunu's deep bass never intrudes on the other parts of the spectrum, and the mids do not seem overly recessed or hollowed-out like some other v-shaped IEMs that I've heard.  But I don't mind a bit more tapering in the highs than what the Dunu offers.  I guess to sum it up, I'm looking for something that does not roll off the sub-bass frequencies, that is generally neutral and clear (i.e., not too warm) through the mid-bass and midrange, and that has good treble presence but slightly smoother than what the Dunu offers up top (so, I guess slightly less than neutral in the highs).

 

Anything come to mind?  Thanks in advance. 

 

Your question certainly makes sense but considering the DN-1000 is one of the best sets I've tried in the sub-$200 and what you're looking for would be an upgrade, it's a tough ask.

 

The closest I can think of to an IEM that has the bottom half of the DN-1000's sound but with smoother highs, and yet maintains very good clarity (maybe just a bit behind the Dunu) is the Sony XBA-H3, and the lowest I've seen those is at $250 or so. Ditto on the Fidue A83, which is also not as harsh up top as the DN-1000 but still has good bass (a little less deep bass than DN-1000/XBA-H3) and clarity (on-par with DN-1000).

 

Everything that I've tried with that level of bass impact and depth in the <$200 bracket doesn't quite measure up to the DN-1000 in clarity, etc - things like the Yamaha EPH-100, RBH EP1, RHA MA750, and so on. Even the new RHA T10i can't keep up with the DN-1000 in clarity. 

post #14842 of 14850

Use M-Duo small triflanges and the Dunu DN1000 become less sharp, another user also reported good results with the FXD tips, but those have to be bought from Japan. The longer the tip, the more the peaks are tamed. 

post #14843 of 14850
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post
 

 

Glad the thread has been useful :beerchug:

 

 

Your question certainly makes sense but considering the DN-1000 is one of the best sets I've tried in the sub-$200 and what you're looking for would be an upgrade, it's a tough ask.

 

The closest I can think of to an IEM that has the bottom half of the DN-1000's sound but with smoother highs, and yet maintains very good clarity (maybe just a bit behind the Dunu) is the Sony XBA-H3, and the lowest I've seen those is at $250 or so. Ditto on the Fidue A83, which is also not as harsh up top as the DN-1000 but still has good bass (a little less deep bass than DN-1000/XBA-H3) and clarity (on-par with DN-1000).

 

Everything that I've tried with that level of bass impact and depth in the <$200 bracket doesn't quite measure up to the DN-1000 in clarity, etc - things like the Yamaha EPH-100, RBH EP1, RHA MA750, and so on. Even the new RHA T10i can't keep up with the DN-1000 in clarity. 

 

Thanks, joker.  So very helpful.  That is exactly the information that I was looking for. 

 

The Dunu's are definitely the best IEM that I've heard so far, and I've been going back and forth in my head as to whether I just need to settle with them or try and seek out something that gets me that other 10-20% of what I'm looking for.  So I was wondering if it was an issue of there being another option in that price range that was similar to the Dunu but with a slightly different approach (a slightly less hot top end), or if instead I would need to upgrade to get what I was looking for.  Knowing that it's the latter is a big help, since it means that I'm going to stick with the DN-1000 for now.  And your suggestions for upgrades are super helpful because in the event that I have the upgrade bug and can expand my budget, I know exactly where to look.  I just found your four-way comparison of the Sony, Fidue, DN-2000, and T-Peos on headphonelist and was reading it extensively.  I will return to that if I decide to upgrade at some point.

 

The other thing that's great about the Dunu is that I can use the various tips and spacers to fit my mood, to match what kind of sound that I'm seeking on a particular day.  I love how versatile it is.  I feel like it can be made to sound like almost four different types of headphones.  It's such a strong demonstration of how much tips and positioning in the ear affect the sound.

 

Btw, I totally agree about how the Yamaha EPH-100's compare to the Dunu's.  I was really surprised by how much of a difference in clarity and quality (the latter is subjective, I know) there was between the Yamaha and the Dunu.  I thought the Yamaha's were going to be the ones when I read the description and tried them last year, but I was disappointed.  I feel like the Dunu's are a definite step up from the Yamaha.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post
 

Use M-Duo small triflanges and the Dunu DN1000 become less sharp, another user also reported good results with the FXD tips, but those have to be bought from Japan. The longer the tip, the more the peaks are tamed. 

 

Thanks for the suggestion.  I haven't tried the M-Duo's or FXD tips, but I have tried the several different biflanges offered with the Dunu, and I agree that the peaks are definitely more tame with a longer tip.  The downside is that it also comes with a loss of the bass response that I love about the Dunu.  This also speaks to the point that I made in my response to joker, that the Dunu's can really sound like multiple different types of IEMs depending on the tips (and spacers) used.  Anyways, what I am hunting for is something that does both (retains the Dunu bass that comes with single flanges but tames the highs), and as joker indicated, I would need to upgrade to get that.


Edited by steelglam - Yesterday at 6:52 am
post #14844 of 14850
FXD tips and M-Duo triflangles are more tapered and fit deeper so you'll likely not lose bass, but ymmv
post #14845 of 14850
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steelglam View Post
 

 

Thanks, joker.  So very helpful.  That is exactly the information that I was looking for. 

 

The Dunu's are definitely the best IEM that I've heard so far, and I've been going back and forth in my head as to whether I just need to settle with them or try and seek out something that gets me that other 10-20% of what I'm looking for.  So I was wondering if it was an issue of there being another option in that price range that was similar to the Dunu but with a slightly different approach (a slightly less hot top end), or if instead I would need to upgrade to get what I was looking for.  Knowing that it's the latter is a big help, since it means that I'm going to stick with the DN-1000 for now.  And your suggestions for upgrades are super helpful because in the event that I have the upgrade bug and can expand my budget, I know exactly where to look.  I just found your four-way comparison of the Sony, Fidue, DN-2000, and T-Peos on headphonelist and was reading it extensively.  I will return to that if I decide to upgrade at some point.

 

The other thing that's great about the Dunu is that I can use the various tips and spacers to fit my mood, to match what kind of sound that I'm seeking on a particular day.  I love how versatile it is.  I feel like it can be made to sound like almost four different types of headphones.  It's such a strong demonstration of how much tips and positioning in the ear affect the sound.

 

Btw, I totally agree about how the Yamaha EPH-100's compare to the Dunu's.  I was really surprised by how much of a difference in clarity and quality (the latter is subjective, I know) there was between the Yamaha and the Dunu.  I thought the Yamaha's were going to be the ones when I read the description and tried them last year, but I was disappointed.  I feel like the Dunu's are a definite step up from the Yamaha..

 

If you have the luxury of a decent EQ, I would play around with that as well. You might be able to get closer to your ideal with relatively minor tweaks (and of course without switching earphones).

post #14846 of 14850
Thread Starter 

Added the Nuforce NE-600X. Great value at the current <$15 as far as bass-heavy earphones go. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

 

 

(3C23) Nuforce NE-600X

 

Details: entry-level model from one of the companies that popularized budget in-ears on Head-Fi

MSRP: $29.95 (manufacturer’s page)
Current Price: $14 from amazon.com
Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 100 dB | Freq: 20-20k Hz | Cable: 3.6′ L-plug
Nozzle Size: 5.5mm | Preferred tips: Stock single-flanges
Wear Style: Straight down (preferred) or over-the-ear

Accessories (1/5) – Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes)
Build Quality (3/5) – The construction of the NE-600X is good for the price, with aluminum housings and tangle-resistant flat cables. I especially like the low-profile L-plug. Mild driver flex is present
Isolation (3/5) – Average for an in-ear of this type
Microphonics (3.5/5) – Decent when worn cable-up; bothersome otherwise
Comfort (4/5) – Here, the NE-600X is actually superior to the higher-end NE-700 – its housings are a little wide, but also more lightweight and rounded at the front for comfort. The earphone does not require a deep seal in the ear. I still prefer the conventional cable of the NE-700, but over-the-ear wear is possible with the flat cord on the NE-600X, especially when using the cable cinch

Sound (7/10) – The Nuforce NE-600X follows a bass-heavy sound signature with a slightly v-shaped profile. The bass is deep and powerful, with impact and rumble reaching what I consider “basshead” levels. Compared even to the Sony MH1C and Philips SHE3580, which are by no means lean at the low end, the NE-600X is simply a bass monster. Bass control is good considering the large quantity of it– slightly better than with NarMoo S1, for example, but short of the RHA MA350 and Dunu Landmine.

The v-shaped sonic profile of the NE-600X works to its advantage – while its midrange is less warm, thinner, and more recessed compared, for example, to the NarMoo S1 and Dunu Landmine, the Nuforce’s clarity is better. Though not quite up there with the Sony MH1C and Philips SHE3580, for such a bass-heavy set the clarity and detail resolution are very impressive, especially considering the low price of the NE-600X.

The tone of the NE-600X is warm on the whole, but its v-shaped signature makes treble energy ample. The result is a bit of harshness compared to the NarMoo S1, Dunu Landmine, and Sony MH1C, all of which sound smoother on the whole. Treble quality is similar to RHA’s MA350, though on the whole the NE-600X is a little more energetic, but not harsher.

The NE-600X also has a surprisingly capable presentation – for a budget in-ear it sounds nice and out-of-the-head. This helps the heavy bass appear less boomy than it otherwise would be. The RHA MA350, for instance, actually sounds more congested despite technically being less mid-bassy and clearer. Another thing to be said for the NE-600X – it is a very efficient earphone. Sensitivity is not something I normally place a lot of importance on, but it matters for budget earphones because purchasers so often equate loudness with quality.

Select Comparisons

NarMoo R1M (black ports) ($25)

NarMoo’s R1M earphone features a sound adjustment system with three pairs of interchangeable tuning ports. These ports most strongly affect the bass quantity of the earphones. The R1M matches the bass of the NE-600X most closely with its bassiest tuning (black ports).

With the R1M in this configuration, both earphones have enormous bass that should satisfy even die-hard bassheads, and yet despite their deep, booming bass, both still offer pretty good clarity and avoid the sort of congestion that often plagues entry-level basshead earphones. The differences are subtle – the NE-600X is warmer while the R1M is a little more neutral. Vocals are a bit more intelligible on the R1M, likely due to slightly greater midrange presence, but overall the NE-600X is a little clearer and more crisp, though also a little more harsh.

Dunu Trident ($28)

Dunu’s entry-level Trident model follows a warm and smooth sound signature while the NE-600X is more v-shaped. The NE-600X is bassier, but its bass quality is still on-par with the Trident, which is impressive. The Nuforce unit is clearer and more crisp than the Trident, too, thanks to the treble emphasis of its v-shaped signature. The Trident is smoother and arguably a little more natural tonally, but the clarity gap makes me favor the NE-600X very slightly. Lastly, the NE-600X is more efficient, which is quite important for an earphone in this price range if it’s to appeal to casual listeners.

Fidue A31s ($30)

Fidue’s entry-level A31s model is a tiny dynamic-driver earphone with a warm and smooth signature akin to that of the Dunu Trident. It has less bass than the NE-600X but more than the Trident, and sounds a little more boomy as well. The tonal character of the A31s is very warm and it is a very smooth earphone, but the extra treble energy of the Nuforce makes it sound significantly clearer. As with the Trident, the smoother sound of the A31s can sound more natural from a tonal standpoint but it is entirely too muffled for my liking compared to the more v-shaped NE-600X. The NE-600X is again more efficient than the Fidue.

T-Peos Tank ($30)

The Tank is the most bass-heavy of the entry-level T-Peos sets and as such made for the most logical comparison for the NE-600X. It still couldn’t match the NE-600X in bass volume, and while its bass is not as tight as that of the T-Peos Rich200 and Popular, it is still significantly less bloated than that of the NE-600X. The Tank is also a lot clearer, at the expense of some of the warmth and note thickness of the Nuforce set. However, the treble of the Tank is harsher and it suffers from a smaller soundstage and significantly less spacious presentation compared to the Nuforce.

Nuforce NE-700X ($65)

For two earphones with a pretty substantial price gap, the NE-600X and NE-700X sound quite similar – the tuning can easily be pegged as belonging to the same family. The higher-end model does sound a little clearer and more controlled overall, which gives it a more Hi-Fi sound. The bass of the NE-600X is a bit less tight and it sounds a little more v-shaped, with slightly harsher treble compared to the NE-700X. The NE-600X is also more efficient. Overall, while I prefer the sound of the NE-700X, there is no denying that the lower-end model is a stronger value.

Value (9.5/10) – The budget-minded Nuforce NE-600X draws on the tuning of the company’s higher-end earphones to deliver an unabashedly bass-heavy sound without sacrificing overall performance, as so many inexpensive enhanced-bass IEMs do. With the recent price drop, this makes it one of the best values around not only for fans of big bass, but also for casual listeners in need of an inexpensive everyday earphone.

Pros: Basshead earphones with good overall performance
Cons: Cable can be a bit noisy when worn straight down


 

 

 

The most up-to-date IEM rankings can be found here.

post #14847 of 14850
Joker have you heard of the UM3DD ?, If I want an upgrade for that at around 800 without going into customs , what would the suitable options? The Ie 800 treble is too high for me
post #14848 of 14850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post

FXD tips and M-Duo triflangles are more tapered and fit deeper so you'll likely not lose bass, but ymmv

OK, that's good to know.  I can see that the M-Duo tips can be purchased from Meelectronics' website, but do you know where JVC FXD tips can be purchased?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post
 

 

If you have the luxury of a decent EQ, I would play around with that as well. You might be able to get closer to your ideal with relatively minor tweaks (and of course without switching earphones).

Yeah, unfortunately I do not have a decent EQ.  I'm currently using them with mainly with a FiiO X3, and FiiO unfortunately has not implemented a workable EQ.  I can play around with the hardware bass and treble controls though.

 

I also sometimes use them on a Rockboxed Sansa Clip+, though, so I can play around with the EQ settings there.  It's not my go-to device, though (except for exercise).

 

Btw, I think the Hifiman RE-400 sound better on the Clip+ than the FiiO X3, but vice versa is true for the Dunu.  I wonder why that is.  I think the Clip+ has a flatter response curve (without tone controls engaged, of course) than the FiiO.


Edited by steelglam - Today at 9:29 am
post #14849 of 14850

Hi Joker,

 

Great how much effort youve put in this many reviews.

As you have tested the famous (?) Monoprice budget IEMs, I thought you might wanted to try these other -bit less famous, but very good- budget IEMs which are more v-shaped.

Majin already compared the Awei ES-800m against the Monoprice (http://www.head-fi.org/t/630536/small-comparison-of-awei-es800m-best-bang-for-buck), maybe you would want to do that too. I found the earphones the cheapest at tinydeal for $5,50 (free shipping). See this link: http://www.tinydeal.com/awei-35mm-audio-jack-stereo-earphones-for-pc-p-57773.html

 

I own them both and I really think they are both great value.

post #14850 of 14850

Just wanted to pass along that LMUE is having a great sale where you can get the GR07 for under $80, BE for $110, DN1k for $175, and DN2k for $280.

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