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Multi-IEM Review - 321 IEMs compared (NarMoo S1 added 09/04/14 p. 966) - Page 805

post #12061 of 14596

HiFiman Re-400 vs VSONIC VC1000?

 

Tastes are: Heavy Metal/Speed Metal/Rock/Dubstep (Treble+Treble/mid_drops+Vocal tastes, groull also in there) and Bass_heavy-Dubstep (meaning high-quality bass drops with little_to_no treble). Of course, Dubstep may combine everything %) Just look at this band if interested - Medusa In My Knickers (- Pig, Pig 2, Check your knickers, Spit) (may be taken as an example of what i listen to). Not a bass-head, but still sympathize it much. Also as an example: Koven - Whoopi's back in the habit (Original Mix).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pyw5ky2FWZg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1W9y-XV0f-E

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04Asvu9IwJY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsmKKxo8oyQ

(sorry for your wallet ears :D)

 

Of course, wishing the best comfort I can get (not sure what a 0.5 difference means, i've read the descriptions).

Preferably, less leakage of sound.

And of course full satisfaction of tastes %).

 

Thanks guys!


Edited by MygpuK - 11/11/13 at 6:01pm
post #12062 of 14596
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artem View Post
 

This set of fischer cans were labeled fun and natural, and also near monitor grade in this review. So I guess this is something that caught my attention. The low ends sounded quite similar to my GR07BE, but with a more forward mid range and better treble extension. Perhaps my only gripe with the FA-004 is that I find myself wanting to tune down that treble a little at times. A good description of my preferred signature would be something a little darker, or at least something with a nice bass response to balance the treble. 

 

Budget? I'm keeping an open mind for now so go crazy i guess? IEM/CIEM are all good suggestions..

 

A bump in the bass with a darker monitor-type signature makes me think Westone UM3X or EarSonics, or even Sony MDR-7550, but none of those have better extension than a GR07 in the treble. Darker usually implies not only less treble energy, but less extension as well. Take the Westone ES5, for example - it's a top-tier custom with excellent bass and mids, but it doesn't have the reach of the GR07 in the treble. The JH13, on the other hand, has fantastic treble extension but it sounds energetic and probably is brighter than you would want. Have you tried applying some EQ to the midrange of the GR07 Bass to see if you can get it where you want it? Bumping up the mids should allow you to listen at lower volumes, reducing the treble intensity a bit. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MygpuK View Post
 

HiFiman Re-400 vs VSONIC VC1000?

 

Tastes are: Heavy Metal/Speed Metal/Rock/Dubstep (Treble+Treble/mid_drops+Vocal tastes, groull also in there) and Bass_heavy-Dubstep (meaning high-quality bass drops with little_to_no treble). Of course, Dubstep may combine everything %) Just look at this band if interested - Medusa In My Knickers (- Pig, Pig 2, Check your knickers, Spit) (may be taken as an example of what i listen to). Not a bass-head, but still sympathize it much. Also as an example: Koven - Whoopi's back in the habit (Original Mix).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pyw5ky2FWZg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1W9y-XV0f-E

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04Asvu9IwJY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsmKKxo8oyQ

(sorry for your wallet ears :D)

 

Of course, wishing the best comfort I can get (not sure what a 0.5 difference means, i've read the descriptions).

Preferably, less leakage of sound.

And of course full satisfaction of tastes %).

 

Thanks guys!

 

There's a full RE-400 / VC1000 comparison in the VC1000 review. 

 

In general they are both neutral-sounding earphones so if you want enhanced bass for your dubstep, look elsewhere. Personally, I would go for the less mid-focused VC1000 for rock and electronic music. 

post #12063 of 14596

Thank you! A problem which is my wallet makes me choose carefully at the moment :D

post #12064 of 14596

Thanks Joker,

 

I'm thoroughly enjoying my GR07BE, using a good equalizer improves the performance too. It's just that I'm looking at some potential upgrades to it, not many IEMs are a significant improvement over these things. 

post #12065 of 14596
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artem View Post
 

Thanks Joker,

 

I'm thoroughly enjoying my GR07BE, using a good equalizer improves the performance too. It's just that I'm looking at some potential upgrades to it, not many IEMs are a significant improvement over these things

 

Yep, that is a "problem" with having a top-tier universal like the GR07.

post #12066 of 14596

AWESOME resource. Refer to it often. Thanks for all your hard work putting it together.

post #12067 of 14596
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shockdoc View Post
 

AWESOME resource. Refer to it often. Thanks for all your hard work putting it together.

 

Thanks, glad it's been helpful! 

post #12068 of 14596
Thread Starter 

Added the 1964EARS V6-Stage

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

(1A12) 1964EARS V6-Stage

 

Reviewed November 2013

Details: 6-driver flagship custom in-ear from Portland, OR-based 1964EARS
Starting Price: $699 from 1964ears.com
Specs: Driver: 6-BA / 3-way crossover | Imp: 22Ω | Sens: 115 dB | Freq: 10-20k Hz | Cable: 4’ L-plug / other lengths available
Wear Style: Over-the-ear

Accessories (5/5) – Shirt clip, ¼” adapter, cleaning tool, and custom crushproof Pelican storage case
Build Quality (5/5) – Aside from its triple-bore configuration, the V6-Stage is similar in construction to my 1964-V3. Molding quality is excellent with no bubbles, very clear faceplates, and good finish around the cable sockets and nozzles. It uses a cable with a standard Westone socket and short memory wire section. Options include recessed cable sockets, ambient vents, custom colors, custom artwork, and various exotic faceplates
Isolation (4/5) – Very good isolation from the fitted acrylic shells
Microphonics (5/5) – Nonexistent as with most of my custom monitors
Comfort (5/5) – As with all acrylic customs, the shells are hard but very comfortable. If the earphones are uncomfortable after an initial break-in period, a refit is probably a good idea. 1964EARS does refits at no cost within the first 30 days

Sound (9.7/10) – The 1964EARS V6-Stage is the company’s latest flagship, designed for “stage, studio and everyday music listening”. It utilizes a 3-way, 6-armature configuration – a setup similar to those of the Unique Melody Miracle and JH Audio JH13 Pro. The sound signature of the V6-Stage combines near-neutral bass, a rich and clear midrange, and crisp treble.

The bass of the V6-Stage is slightly above neutral in quantity – a touch less impactful than with the JH13 Pro but more so compared to other reference earphones such as the Custom Art Music One, HiFiMan RE-600, and Etymotic Research ER-4S. Bass depth is very good and the low end is tight and controlled. In a way, the V6-Stage is the best of both worlds – it makes bassier earphones such as the FitEar TG334 sound boomy in comparison without giving a bass quality advantage to flatter sets from HiFiMan, Etymotic Research, and the like.

The midrange of the V6-Stage has a neutral tone with a smooth and rich character that prevents it from sounding “analytical”. Note thickness is good and the mids appear very natural overall. The V6-Stage is not as lean as the Etymotic ER-4S and its upper midrange is a little less prominent. Clarity is excellent –aided by its prominent treble, the 1964EARS unit has an advantage here over sets such as the FitEar TG334 and Heir Audio 8.A, and makes the more treble-shy RE-600 sound downright dull in comparison.

However, the treble is prominent enough to where recording quality becomes important. The earphone is significantly brighter than sets such as the Custom Art Music One and Heir 8.A, and its treble character has a tendency accentuate sibilance. This is somewhat source-dependent and more prone to occurring at higher volumes, but the fact remains that the V6-Stage is less forgiving than even the Etymotic ER-4S. Other than that, the treble is excellent – crisp and well-extended, carrying enough energy to balance out the overall sound, bass emphasis and all.

The impressive end-to-end extension of the V6-Stage also reflects in its presentation, which is broad and spacious. The soundstage is larger compared to most universals as well as many customs, such as the Music One. It is a touch more constrained than that of the JH13 Pro but on the whole the presentation of the V6-Stage is as well-rounded as anything I’ve heard in its price bracket.

Select Comparisons

EarSonics SM64 ($399)

The SM64 is a triple-armature universal-fit earphone that impresses, among other things, with its bass response. Compared to the V6-Stage, its bass reaches deeper and hits harder but still maintains excellent control. In the midrange, the 1964EARS perform better – while the SM64 is biased towards the lower midrange, the V6-Stage is quite level throughout, offering flatter upper mids and a more balanced and neutral sound. It sounds clearer, less congested, and more refined than the SM64 except for a bit of peakiness in the treble, which makes the V6-Stage sound a little hotter and more “tizzy” next to the darker EarSonics.

Alclair Reference ($399)

Alclair’s Reference monitor pursues a sound signature very similar to that of the V6-Stage, falling a bit short of the V6 in overall performance. Bass quantity is similar between the earphones but the Reference is slightly mid-recessed and sounds more “dry” whereas the V6-Stage has a fuller, smoother sound with a more prominent midrange. Treble performance is also similar between the two – both units have a tendency to exaggerate sibilance and sound a little “hot” on certain tracks, with the V6-Stage performing a bit better in this regard. In terms of presentation, too, the V6-Stage comes across as more versatile and convincing, with a little more imaging prowess and better balance of width and depth.

1964EARS 1964-V3 ($425)

While the similarly-priced Alclair Reference bears a strong resemblance to the V6-Stage, 1964EARS’ own triple-driver sounds quite different. The 1964-V3 is bassier and more “boomy” than the V6-Stage, with the powerful mid-bass response providing much greater impact. This results in a warmer and at times more bloated sound. The V6-Stage, with its tighter, less powerful bass, also has better clarity, especially in the midrange, and sounds more refined and detailed. It is more balanced and neutral whereas the V3 is more colored. In terms of presentation, the boomier bass of the V3 makes it a touch more congested but both units provide a good sense of space.

Westone ES5 ($950)

Westone’s flagship custom is a warm and smooth affair that emphasizes it lows and mids. The ES5 has more bass than the 1964EARS V6-Stage, but the V6 is a little more textured and controlled. Its mids are leaner and clearer while the ES5 sounds fuller and more forward in the midrange. The treble of the Westones is smoother but the overall sound is darker and a bit more muffled. The 1964EARS, on the other hand, have treble that is brighter and peakier, and tend to be more sibilant. I find the V6-Stage to sound more natural overall, though the peaks in the treble region sometimes cause it to sound a little “tizzy” in comparison. In terms of presentation, the ES5 tends to be more intimate, especially in the midrange, whereas the V6-Stage is wider and more laid-back, a-la the UM Miracle.

Unique Melody Miracle ($950)

The UM Miracle has always impressed me most with its ability to sound neutral and balanced, yet remain smooth and not at all analytical. Compared to the Miracle, the V6-Stage produces a little more bass, especially mid-bass, lending it a slightly fuller and warmer sound. The 1964EARS sound a bit more colored as a result of the bass emphasis whereas the Miracle is more neutral and balanced. The Miracle also remains flatter through the upper midrange, boasting more presence there a-la the Etymotic ER-4S. At the top, the V6-Stage is more sibilant despite having similar overall treble energy, while the Miracle is smoother and has a bit more air. The Miracle is slightly more open-sounding with a marginally more spacious soundstage.

Value (9/10) – The mid-level 1964EARS customs I’ve tried have offered solid value for money, and the new 1964EARS V6-Stage is doing the same for the flagship segment of the still-developing custom in-ear market. The earphones are very well-made and the sound hits the sweet spot, falling just warm of neutral with a bit of added bass, mids that are clear but not thin, and crisp, if slightly hot, treble. It is an extremely competent earphone that competes with pricier models such as the Westone ES5 and Heir Audio 8.A. Like the less expensive 1964-V3, the V6-Stage is an easy recommendation in its price range and, in contrast to the V3, should work for professional applications as well as consumer audio.

Pros: Great molding quality; isolation and comfort of a custom in-ear; impressive overall performance
Cons: Can accentuate sibilance

 

The updated ranking can be found here.


Edited by ljokerl - 11/13/13 at 9:21am
post #12069 of 14596
Thank you (esp. the SM64 compare).

YOU 'DA MAN!
post #12070 of 14596
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

EarSonics SM64 ($399)

The SM64 is a quad-armature universal-fit earphone that impresses, among other things, with its bass response. Compared to the V6-Stage, its bass reaches deeper and hits harder but still maintains excellent control. In the midrange, the 1964EARS perform better – while the SM64 is biased towards the lower midrange, the V6-Stage is quite level throughout, offering flatter upper mids and a more balanced and neutral sound. It sounds clearer, less congested, and more refined than the SM64 except for a bit of peakiness in the treble, which makes the V6-Stage sound a little hotter and more “tizzy” next to the darker EarSonics.

Wait..isn't the SM64 supposed to be a three driver per ear iem? :confused: Btw the V6-Stage appears to be a bargain.

post #12071 of 14596

Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

(1A12) 1964EARS V6-Stage

 

 

 

Joker!!! you did it again, superb. I like the way you present information and provide  good comparison parameters with other well known CEIMs.

I own some IEM (GR07, Triple Fi10, XB-4, XB-3..) and have always been thinking about getting some CEIMs, at the top of my list sits always 1964 ears together with JH Audio (right under them is alwas a place for Cosmic Ears). May ask about a quick comparison between 1964Ears and JH Audio?? 

post #12072 of 14596

That's an excellent review of the V6 Stage. It sounds very good and at the price it goes for it really is a no brainer and even better for those who got them at the introductory price of $100 off.

post #12073 of 14596
Wow the V6 Stage sounds awesome, can't wait to try it out soon! Might become my on-the-go ciem but I'll have to save up some money first... :/
post #12074 of 14596
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericr View Post

Thank you (esp. the SM64 compare).

YOU 'DA MAN!

 

I try :beerchug:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisRPM12 View Post
 

Wait..isn't the SM64 supposed to be a three driver per ear iem? :confused: Btw the V6-Stage appears to be a bargain.

 

Whoops, brain fart.

 

The V6 is a good value for sure. I wasn't expecting as a large a gap between the V3 and V6-Stage. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Lehrer View Post
 

Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

(1A12) 1964EARS V6-Stage

 

 

 

Joker!!! you did it again, superb. I like the way you present information and provide  good comparison parameters with other well known CEIMs.

I own some IEM (GR07, Triple Fi10, XB-4, XB-3..) and have always been thinking about getting some CEIMs, at the top of my list sits always 1964 ears together with JH Audio (right under them is alwas a place for Cosmic Ears). May ask about a quick comparison between 1964Ears and JH Audio?? 

 

JH13 vs V6-Stage

Not a huge difference between them but the JH13 wins out mostly in treble quality and overall presentation/soundstaging. The V6-Stage has similar clarity but tends to have a little less bass impact and less forward mids. It is a little more sibilant as well. The JH13Pro has more prominent mids and more bass impact. Tonally it sounds slightly warmer than the V6 and is more rich and full-bodied overall, with a slightly more convincing and dynamic presentation. Its treble is smoother and a little more extended. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rawrster View Post
 

That's an excellent review of the V6 Stage. It sounds very good and at the price it goes for it really is a no brainer and even better for those who got them at the introductory price of $100 off.

 

Thanks, and agreed! 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by OziasEvangeline View Post

Wow the V6 Stage sounds awesome, can't wait to try it out soon! Might become my on-the-go ciem but I'll have to save up some money first... :/

 

That it does ;) 

post #12075 of 14596

Hey joker, since you have a ton of experience with a variety of IEMs how would something like the TF10 compare with the Westone 3 and the Klipsch x10(i)??

 

If either go on sale on black friday I might get it. But I like how the x10s are just an easy in and out rather than over the ear and possibly an uncomfortable fit from the TF10s but if the sound quality does not match them I may have to get the TF10 or Westone 3. :D

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