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Multi-IEM Review - 320 IEMs compared (Xiaomi Piston 2 added 08/21/14 p. 958) - Page 877

post #13141 of 14462
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbyone View Post
 

Maybe you should buy it from your own money! :smile:

 

Which was the last IEM that you purchased, so it wasn't sent by the manufacturer or distributer?


Wow.  Bite the hand that feeds much?

 

You take what is by far the most extensive and quite possibly the most worthwhile IEM comparison in existence and crap all over it because of how they were obtained for trial listening?

 

How in God's name would someone be able to compare 300+ IEM's for everyone if they had to purchase every last one of them on their own?  Sit back and ask yourself that question.

 

I for one am thankful that ljokerl has a reputation as a solid, reliable, and objective reviewer of IEMs such that manufacturers are willing to send ones for trial listening.

post #13142 of 14462
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbyone View Post
 

Maybe you should buy it from your own money! :smile:

 

Which was the last IEM that you purchased, so it wasn't sent by the manufacturer or distributer?

 

    its a bit hard man , if you like them so much , you should buy one , they have a nice feedback on them like being " better then any thing under $100 " , and i take these things with a spoon of salt , there is a review that says b&w c5 is one of the best iem you can buy , where is my salt bag .

post #13143 of 14462
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbyone View Post

Maybe you should buy it from your own money! smile.gif

Which was the last IEM that you purchased, so it wasn't sent by the manufacturer or distributer?

Why should Joker purchase his own when he's helping the manufacturers to review and through that he's helping them. If I were one of the manufacturers I'll be more than glad to give Joker all my product so that he can introduce them to the whole world. To be honest I can't blame some people who are so jealous of Joker, I feel so sorry for them. You want to be treated like Joker then earn your respect and contribute like him.
Edited by Francisk - 3/6/14 at 10:46am
post #13144 of 14462
Is it better to have hollow IEM shells or filled with acrylic as is tradition for fitear?
Also, what IEM had the best build quality. I often see IEMs in pictures with air bubbles in and they aren't polished. So far as far as I am concerned, fitear is the best at craftsmanship. The attention to detail is impeccable.
post #13145 of 14462
Is there a review for 535ltd??
post #13146 of 14462
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabsjl View Post
 

how about the Aurisonics ASG-2 vs the SM64?

 

I haven't tried the ASG-2.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukalop View Post

If I took an acrylic IEM, say a JH13 Pro and shook it violently, would the sound tubes inside or anything break (assuming they were not connected to cables)?

 

Doubtful, these components don't weigh a whole lot so they should stay put, but I'm not going to try it. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGuzmanWhite View Post
 

Upgrading from RE-400 ... shure SE535 LTD or InEar StageDriver 2? other?

 

This is a question for ljokerl or anyone familiar with the IEMs mentioned below, if you are kind to help me out on deciding the upgrade path to take.

 

I have the RE-400 and also the Sony XBA-3i and I have been enjoying them for 1.5 years, but I am ready to upgrade to the next EIM with an clear improvement in SQ. Budget in the range of $400-$600 but I could go all the day to $1200. I am looking for a well balanced IEM that improves the sound signature of the RE-400 in the following areas (see below). Please note that most of te use will be on-the-go playing with iPhone 5 or future iphone 6 when I travel (don't link to carry amps, etc)

 

1.- Improved soundstage: I like out of your head soundstage

2.- Improved instrument separation and imaging: I love when the music has nuance to separate the instruments in 3D

3.- Bigger bass slam, I don't necessarily need deep sub-bass but I love bass texture and impact without affecting other frequencies of the general tonality of the headphone

4.- Extended highs, a bit more extended than the RE-400 but without going into the harsh and silvant highs, so needs to control the HF

5.- Rapid dynamics (good PRaT): i listen to moderm music, mostly rock, indie, electronic, vocals, etc, so I need an IEM that can keep the fast pace as needed.

 

Regarding the budget, I may consider even high end EIMs (e.g. Shure SE846) if everyone agrees that it is is a class clearly superior but I would rather try to be in the $400-$600 price range if feasible.

 

I tested the Shure SE-535 Limited Edition (Red) and I liked it but it fails to have great highs. Still it is enjoyable juts feels overpriced for $550 in the USA.  Give the review from ljokerl on the InEar StageDriver 2, it seems that this IEM would be improving the RE in all the areas mentioned, but as I cannot test it, it is hard to make a decision.

 

BTW, yesterday I had the chance to test the high end Shure SE846 and the AKG K3003i. I was utterly impressed by the Shure SE846 (with the white/bright filter on to enhance HF) more "real" sound that the AKG.  If it would be more comfortable I would have bought it on the spot. I was so impressed. The bass, kids are perfection, extremely well balanced EIM and very musical, more so that the AKG K3003i. 

 

Thanks much for your advise.

 

 

I haven't tried the LTD edition of the SE535 but I was under the impression it should have improved highs compared to the regular SE535. 

 

Regarding the SD-2 vs RE-400, I don't really have anything to add to this bit from the SD-2 review:

 

 

Quote:
 

The SD-2 has a touch more bass than the RE-400, with the difference being more apparent in the subbass region. It is also clearer and slightly more resolving, and boasts more treble energy while still remaining extremely smooth and non-fatiguing, beating HiFiMan at their own game. The RE-400, on the other hand, has more forward mids and sounds a little too focused on its midrange. The soundstage of the RE-400 also appears a little too forward and flat next to the spacious and well-layered StageDiver.

 

 

Unfortunately I can’t comment on the SE846 as I haven’t tried it – that’s a real shame about the comfort if you really liked the sound. I do agree that the RE-400/SE535/SD-2 sound very different from the K3003 and the K3003 is not a good RE-400 upgrade.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbyone View Post
 

Maybe you should buy it from your own money! :smile:

 

Which was the last IEM that you purchased, so it wasn't sent by the manufacturer or distributer?

 

The Philips IEMs I bought last week.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukalop View Post

Is it better to have hollow IEM shells or filled with acrylic as is tradition for fitear?
Also, what IEM had the best build quality. I often see IEMs in pictures with air bubbles in and they aren't polished. So far as far as I am concerned, fitear is the best at craftsmanship. The attention to detail is impeccable.

 

You might want to ask average_joe this question - as far as I know none of my customs have a solid fill. Out of the CIEMs I have, the best cosmetic quality goes to Heir Audio and Noble. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JuzModa View Post

Is there a review for 535ltd??

 

I haven't tried them.

post #13147 of 14462
Thread Starter 

Added the HiSoundAudio BA100

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post
 

 

(2C61) HiSoundAudio BA100

 

Reviewed February 2014

Details: HiSound’s first Balanced Armature earphone with a driver of their own design
MSRP: $99 (manufacturer’s page)
Current Price: $75 from ebay.com
Specs: Driver: BA | Imp: 36Ω | Sens: 109 dB | Freq: 20-20k Hz | Cable: 4’ 45°-degree plug with mic & 1-button remote
Nozzle Size: 5.5mm | Preferred tips: Stock single-flanges, MEElec M6 single & bi-flanges
Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear

Accessories (3.5/5) – Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes), cable winder, shirt clip, and zippered carrying case
Build Quality (3.5/5) – The design of the BA100 seems similar to that of the aging HiSound Crystal, yet is different in a couple of ways. First, it uses two-step nozzles – a solution I haven’t seen for a while which allows two different positions for the eartips. The nozzles are flared at the front and show off the copper construction of the earphone housings. The BA100 also has a different cable compared to the Crystal, which feels a bit less durable but is holding up admirably so far. There is no cable cinch
Isolation (4/5) – Can be very good but varies depending on where the eartips are positioned as well as how deep the earphones are inserted
Microphonics (3.5/5) – Can be bothersome, but greatly reduced with over-the-ear wear
Comfort (4.5/5) – As noted above, the BA100 allows eartips to be either pulled all the way on to the nozzle, or positioned further out using the additional lip. I ended up preferring to keep the tips on the outer notch, but the difference it made wasn’t huge. I quite like the BA100 for comfort – the housings are very light and slim, kept entirely away from the outer ear. They are easy to wear over-the-ear and can be very comfortable with the right eartip configuration

Sound (7.9/10) – The BA100 is HiSoundAudio’s first balanced armature earphone and its drivers are said to be designed by, or at least built to specification from, HiSound themselves. For those not intimately familiar with balanced armatures, this is a pretty big deal as most balanced armatures, especially those used by Western brands, come pre-tuned from one of two major balanced armature OEMs – Knowles or Sonion. This is why, for example, it can be said that the Ultimate Ears 700, Brainwavz B2, and VSonic VC1000 (among many others) “share” a driver – they all use the Knowles TWFK armature, although potentially different variants of it.

The driver in the BA100 has a rather unique voicing and most likely does not come from either Knowles or Sonion. What surprised me most at the outset, however, was its low efficiency. For a BA it’s really not very efficient despite the rather high stated sensitivity. This is not an issue other than making volume-matched comparisons against other earphones a bit more difficult, and of course requiring a notch or two of extra volume from the source.

On to the sound – what HiSound has created here is a balanced-sounding earphone with a rather neutral tonal character. Bass quantity is low-to-medium – it is not the most impactful, but certainly good for a single balanced armature. The extension is there but the earphone just lacks the rumble and air movement at the lowest lows compared to many dynamic-driver and multi-BA sets. Bass control is quite good – for example the VSonic VSD1S and Astrotec AM-800, two of my favorite sub-$100 dynamic-driver earphones, sound bassier – but also more boomy – compared to the BA100.

The mids of the BA100 are not very prominent but the earphone can’t be accused of having a recessed midrange, either. The VSD1S, for example, sounds noticeably v-shaped in comparison. The BA100 has similar clarity to the VSD1S and lags just behind the brighter AM-800 and VSonic VC02. Compared to the BA100, the Ultimate Ears 600, another solid sub-$100 BA earphone, sounds more forward in the midrange and also a touch cleaner, as if lifting a slight veil or bit of distortion that’s present over the BA100. This is not at all noticeable on EDM tracks, for example, but rather with rock and metal, especially with the presence of distorted guitars.

At the top, the BA100 has strong enough treble presence, albeit with only moderate extension. Its treble is not particularly peaky, but with an “edgy” character that on occasion manifests in a bit of harshness, especially since the neutral bass quantity and lack of brightness make it easy to inadvertently raise the volume. The VSD1S, AM-800, and VC02 all have more sibilance compared to the BA100 while the UE600 is smoother than the HiSound unit.

The presentation of the BA100 is good – more spacious compared to the majority of sub-$100 BA sets, especially those based on the Knowles SR driver. The BA100 doesn’t have great dynamics but definitely doesn’t sound as small as the SR-based earphones. It lacks some air compared to the UE600 and some width compared to Astrotec’s rather spacious-sounding AM-800 but overall puts up a good performance for the price.

Select Comparisons

Astrotec AM-90 ($44)

Seeking a good example of Knowles’ entry-level SR armature, better known as the “Siren”, to compare to HiSound’s freshman BA effort, I selected the Astrotec AM-90, one of the best SR implementations I’ve tried alongside the MEElectronics A151 and Rock-It Sounds R-20. SR-based earphones tend to struggle a little at the bottom and up top but generally produce nice mids with a warmer tone compared to many other BA earphones. Indeed, the AM-90 sounds mid-centric next to the HiSoundAudio set, with a more intimate midrange and a touch more mid-bass presence for a warmer overall tone. The BA100 has more capable subbass and less forward mids with no loss in clarity. The AM-90 has smoother, more relaxed treble whereas the BA100 is a little brighter and more balanced overall. It also has a more spacious presentation than the somewhat intimate-sounding Astrotec unit.

Moe Audio MOE-SS01 ($65)

The MOE-SS01 is a very unique earphone in its price bracket, utilizing twin 5.8mm dynamic drivers to deliver a crisp, bright, and somewhat v-shaped sound. Compared to the BA100, the SS01 has greater deep bass emphasis and sounds more effortless when it comes to subbass rumble and slam. Its dynamic drivers produce a more natural bass presentation. Despite its bass presence, however, the SS01 has excellent clarity. Both earphones have strong presence in the upper midrange and lower treble and can sound a bit edgy, even approaching harsh, but the SS01 has a little more energy overall, which gets it in more trouble on occasion. However, the greater treble energy and extension of the SS01 also give it a more open and clear sound overall.

HiFiMan RE400 ($99)

One of my most-used benchmarks in the sub-$100 range, the RE-400 is an accuracy-oriented dynamic-driver earphone with a near-neutral sound signature. To the BA100’s credit, it can keep up with the RE-400 in bass depth but the dynamic-driver HiFiMan unit provides greater bass impact. The midrange is the focus of the presentation with the RE-400, and the HiFiMan sounds stronger and a touch clearer than the BA100 there. At the top, the RE-400 is extremely smooth and slightly relaxed while the BA100 has a more prominent – and harsher – upper midrange and lower treble region. The RE-400 also has excellent treble refinement and extension, and sounds more natural to me on the whole as a result.

MEElectronics A161P ($100)

The A161P utilizes a different balanced armature driver from Knowles than the Astrotec AM-90 – the ED. Compared to the BA100, the A161P offers up punchier bass and mids that are stronger and clearer. The BA100 lacks some of the midrange forwardness and clarity, appearing to have a slight veil, or perhaps even a bit of barely-audible distortion – in the midrange. In the upper midrange the A161P begins to appear a little grainy while the BA100 is a touch harsher, likely in the 3-5k range, and neither has a major advantage over the other in treble quality. Neither earphone has a very large soundstage, either. Worth noting also is the enormous difference in efficiency between these two earphones, the A161P reaching ear-splitting volumes almost too easily, and the BA100 requiring quite a push.

Value (7.5/10) – HiSoundAudio’s first BA-based earphone is a solid entrant in the sub-$100 price bracket. I love the small size, light weight, and comfortable fit of the earphones, as well as the solid noise isolation. I like the balanced and neutral sound, too, though there is a bit of room to grow and the overall performance can be somewhat genre-dependent. It is a step above most entry-level BA-based earphones but also requires more power than much of the competition. Still, the BA100 is a compelling buy at current pricing, especially for those outside the US.

Pros: small and lightweight form factor; good noise isolation; balanced sound signature
Cons: less sensitive than most BA earphones; treble quality could be better

 

The overall IEM ranking has been updated here.

post #13148 of 14462

i had higher hopes for ba100 , thanks for the review man .

post #13149 of 14462

i wonder if you have come across xba-c10 , they are really nice for $50  .

post #13150 of 14462

Please please please please review Philips SHE3580....

Im just soooooo curious about this earphone.

I already have this earphone, i think it is good but not that good.. (i dont have good IEM to compare with)

 

I want to buy iem with the price around $100, but I afraid that it will be worse than she3580 (Joe said it is even better than ER-4P which cost about $300)

 

so pleasee review this earphone

post #13151 of 14462
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nakanuku View Post

Please please please please review Philips SHE3580....
Im just soooooo curious about this earphone.
I already have this earphone, i think it is good but not that good.. (i dont have good IEM to compare with)

I want to buy iem with the price around $100, but I afraid that it will be worse than she3580 (Joe said it is even better than ER-4P which cost about $300)

so pleasee review this earphone

With heavy EQ I think.
post #13152 of 14462
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nakanuku View Post
 

Please please please please review Philips SHE3580....

Im just soooooo curious about this earphone.

I already have this earphone, i think it is good but not that good.. (i dont have good IEM to compare with)

 

I want to buy iem with the price around $100, but I afraid that it will be worse than she3580 (Joe said it is even better than ER-4P which cost about $300)

 

so pleasee review this earphone

 

    that is a hoax for me , she3580 is nothing but a good entry level phone , anything , anything like a ba does better then she 3580 . its not refined enough , not balanced enough , and its nothing against er-4p , its just that joe dont like er-p4 because of its lack of bass .

post #13153 of 14462
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by suman134 View Post
 

i had higher hopes for ba100 , thanks for the review man .

 

It has promise and I may have been a touch harsh with the value score there at the current sub-$100 price, but some of the initial launch claims were a bit too lofty.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by suman134 View Post
 

i wonder if you have come across xba-c10 , they are really nice for $50  .

 

Never tried them. Wonder if they use a different driver from the XBA-1, which is priced similarly and sounded pretty decent.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nakanuku View Post
 

Please please please please review Philips SHE3580....

Im just soooooo curious about this earphone.

I already have this earphone, i think it is good but not that good.. (i dont have good IEM to compare with)

 

I want to buy iem with the price around $100, but I afraid that it will be worse than she3580 (Joe said it is even better than ER-4P which cost about $300)

 

so pleasee review this earphone

 

I think Joe listens to it with his custom equalizer settings which will give a very different experience than just using the stock configuration. Depending on what you're looking for in comparison, an upgrade to a stock 3580 can be as inexpensive as the $50 VSonic VC02. 

post #13154 of 14462
Quote:
Originally Posted by suman134 View Post
 

 

    that is a hoax for me , she3580 is nothing but a good entry level phone , anything , anything like a ba does better then she 3580 . its not refined enough , not balanced enough , and its nothing against er-4p , its just that joe dont like er-p4 because of its lack of bass .

But many other people also praise she 3580?

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by MoonYeol View Post


With heavy EQ I think.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

I think Joe listens to it with his custom equalizer settings which will give a very different experience than just using the stock configuration. Depending on what you're looking for in comparison, an upgrade to a stock 3580 can be as inexpensive as the $50 VSonic VC02. 
 
I have always used she3590 without any custom equalizer, this was mainly because joe said that his brother prefers the stock one (beside I am too lazy to use equalizer). That's why it will be very nice if you can review she 3580/90 (with and without EQ), i guess it will satisfy many members' curiosity :)
 
About your suggestion, how it compares to Vsonic VSD1S? It costs almost the same, and I like classical music.
I'm also thinking about Sony MH1C, since it has many useful buttons. How far is the difference in the sound quality? Do you think the "buttons" worth the loss in sound quality?
 
thanks!

Edited by Nakanuku - 3/7/14 at 1:43am
post #13155 of 14462
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nakanuku View Post
 

 

    not me , if i have to chose between rp-hje120 or she3580 , i will go with rp-hje120 , she has stiffer cable , and bad microphonics and not as defined as hje120 , if a hje 120 can beat it , think what a vsd1 will do to it .

    and what is your requirement ? you want bass ? more mids ( 3580 is v shaped ) ? get the first upgrade like ha-fx40 for as less as 20$ and write back ( its heavily v shaped ) .

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