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Multi-IEM Review - 314 IEMs compared (Olasonic Flat-4 Nami added 04/13/14 p. 894) - Page 725

post #10861 of 13414
Quote:
Originally Posted by Change is Good View Post

Hello, again, joker.

 

I am still on my journey of finding my most suitable IEM. SO far I have been satisfied with both the GR07 mk2 and the Gr07 BE. I have no major gripes with either, I just wish the bass was somewhere in between the two. 

If those don't compare well with the GR07 I may just have to go back to the MK2 and EQ its bass to my likings. I may also just give the Fidelio S2 before doing so.

Here's how to improve the bass response on the regular GR07, block the front vent next to the nozzle with a piece of tape, and boom, subbbass kick is improved. If you think this is too much, puncture a hole with a needle and it's tamed a little, but still with a boosted subbass, better than stock. 

post #10862 of 13414
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwinter View Post

 

The dual balanced armature vsonic IEMs are GR01 which you likely meant, and the the newer and cheaper VC1000. The GR07 is their current flagship dynamic driver. I don't think any vsonics have flat cables...

 

Recent bang for your buck sound quality contenders at the $100 price point are the HiFiMAN RE-400 and the Philips Fidelio S1.

 

There are many dynamics that are more than a match for balanced armatures, and vice versa. biggrin.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

There are dynamic IEMs that outperform similarly-priced BA ones and vice versa. You should focus on the type of signature you want. Among those three, the SE215 is the bassiest and lightest on the treble, the GR07 is balanced with a slight bass bump and plenty of treble energy. The DBA-02 mkII is very balanced with less bass than the GR07. There are also tons and tons of other options in that price range as well. 

 

 

The SF3 is a good earphone but it's rolled off in the bass and treble. It's very smooth though, and has nice mids, but you don't need to spend $179 on a GR07 to upgrade from it. If you want something that's reminiscent of the SF3 but covers more of the frequency spectrum, without spending too much, the UE 600 would work for you. Spending a little more, the HiFiMan RE-400 is a good, balanced-sounding option. 

 

Thanks for the replies.  So many choices...gah!  I certainly don't dislike the SF3s, but I've had them for probably a good 5 years and didn't do extensive research when I purchased them.  I'd say they sound balanced, but lean towards hollow.  They aren't warm, and certainly don't have a lot of bass.

 

Two other's I'd throw in to the mix after researching are the Brainwavz B2 and the TDK BA-200.

 

Ideal - full spectrum, clear separation between treble, mids and bass, with good noise isolation.

post #10863 of 13414

Hi Joker!

 

Do you know if there's a difference in sound between the Westone 4 and westone 4R?? I'm just curious.

 

Thank you!

post #10864 of 13414
Actually had the chance to listen to the B&O H3s today. I liked the sound. I think it may have been a bit heavy on the bass, but it sounded full. Definitely could tell it had a broader frequency than my SF 3s. Given name I think they are overpriced by 50-100$. I am curious to hear where others think the G07, SE 215, B B2, Hifiman 400, and DBA-02 MkII compare sound for dollar.
Edited by Superman07 - 7/5/13 at 6:06pm
post #10865 of 13414
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superman07 View Post

 

 

Thanks for the replies.  So many choices...gah!  I certainly don't dislike the SF3s, but I've had them for probably a good 5 years and didn't do extensive research when I purchased them.  I'd say they sound balanced, but lean towards hollow.  They aren't warm, and certainly don't have a lot of bass.

 

Two other's I'd throw in to the mix after researching are the Brainwavz B2 and the TDK BA-200.

 

Ideal - full spectrum, clear separation between treble, mids and bass, with good noise isolation.

 

The B2 is not something I would recommend if you want at least as much warmth as the SF3. The BA-200 I'm not familiar with. If you do want a warmer, fuller, bassier sound compared to the SF3, I would go for the SE215 or GR07/GR07 Bass Edition out of your original choices. The SE215 isolates better but the GR07 is clearer and has quite a bit more treble energy.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Towwers View Post

Hi Joker!

 

Do you know if there's a difference in sound between the Westone 4 and westone 4R?? I'm just curious.

 

Thank you!

 

According to Westone there is not (at least not intentionally). The W4 does not appear on Westone's site anymore so it seems like the W4R is the only extant -4 model. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Superman07 View Post

Actually had the chance to listen to the B&O H3s today. I liked the sound. I think it may have been a bit heavy on the bass, but it sounded full. Definitely could tell it had a broader frequency than my SF 3s. Given name I think they are overpriced by 50-100$. I am curious to hear where others think the G07, AS215, B B2, Hickman 400, and DBA-02 MkII compare sound for dollar.


I haven't heard any B&O headphones. 

post #10866 of 13414
Thread Starter 

Logitech Ultimate Ears 600 review below

 

 

(2C58) Ultimate Ears 600 / 600vi / Logitech UE 600

 

Added July 2013

 

Details: Long-running staple of the UE lineup previously known as the Super.Fi 5

Current Price: $60 from amazon.com (MSRP: $119.99); $120 for 600vi w/mic & 3-button remote

Specs: Driver: BA | Imp: 13Ω | Sens: 115 dB | Freq: 20-20k Hz | Cable: 4' I-plug

Nozzle Size: 4.5mm | Preferred tips: Stock Comply, generic bi-flange

Wear Style: Over-the-ear or straight down

 

Accessories (4/5) - Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes), Comply foam tips (2 sets), and hard plastic carrying case

Build Quality (3.5/5) - All-plastic construction, color-coded nozzles, and chromed housings are all reminiscent of the lower-end UE earphones. The cable is identical to the one used by the UE 700 - soft and flexible, but plasticky and not very well-relieved

Isolation (3.5/5) - Nozzles are long and lend themselves to deep insertion fairly well. Isolation is good but still lags behind many pricier BA-based earphones

Microphonics (4.5/5) - Quite low in the soft and flexible cable, and can be eliminated completely with over-the-ear wear

Comfort (4.5/5) - The curved shells and long nozzles of the SF5 allow them to be worn either cord-up or cord-down quite easily, though the position of the mic suggests over-the-ear wear. The housings are very light and rarely come in contact with the ear, much like those of the Phonak PFE and Future Sonics Atrio earphones

 

Sound (8.6/10) - Originally known as the Ultimate Ears Super.Fi 5, the single-armature UE 600 took its spot in the UE lineup over from the dual-armature Super.Fi 5 Pro model. Sonically, it differs greatly from its predecessor, taking on a more balanced and accurate sound. At the low end, the UE 600 sounds like a typical single-armature earphone, lacking the enhanced bass of UE’s dynamic-driver models. The bass is very level and controlled, with impact that is on-par with the Etymotic Research HF5 and lags slightly behind the MEElec A161P.

 

The midrange, on the other hand, is more prominent. The UE 600 places the mids front and center. It is still more neutral than the vast majority of entry-level earphones but for me sounds slightly mid-centric, albeit very clear and refined. This could be due to an impedance interaction with my sources, but it is consistent across all of the ones I’ve tried. Tonally, the UE 600 is a touch warmer than the UE 700 and other TWFK-based sets, as well as the Etymotic HF5, but detail and overall transparency are still very good.

 

The top end of the UE 600 is clean and smooth, if not particularly sparkly. The UE can’t quite match the delicacy and detail of the HiFiMan RE-400 but still impresses with the slightly relaxed nature of its treble. There is absolutely no grain and the earphone tends to avoid harshness and sibilance. It is also not overly critical of lower-bitrate files. I would say this was done on purpose due to its low price point, but the flagship UE 900 model has similar tendencies. Admittedly, the UE 900 does have better treble presence, energy, and extension, sounding more natural overall, but there is also a huge price gap in play there.

 

The UE 600 possesses an impressively wide soundstage but doesn’t keep up too well with higher-end earphones. I found it lacking overall dynamics and the separation of higher-end sets such as the quad-driver UE 900 model. As a result, the soundstage has comparatively poor depth and layering and the overall sonic image is a bit flat, much like that of the similarly-priced Creative Aurvana In-Ear 3.

 

Value (9.5/10) - The UE 600 is a little plasticky in build but remains lightweight, comfortable, and fairly well-isolating courtesy of the included Comply eartips. The sound is neutral to somewhat mid-centric, with very good clarity, decent bass presence, and smooth, forgiving treble. It sounds great with music and is especially well-suited for audiobooks and phone calls with its forward, highly intelligible vocal presentation. Simply put, it’s a great fit for anyone in search of a comfortable earphone with excellent mids.

 

Pros: Comfortable form factor; very low cable noise; smooth, yet accurate sound

Cons: Plasticky build quality and typical UE cable; prone to impedance interactions with high-OI sources

post #10867 of 13414

Definitely the highest sound quality to lowest price ratio I've seen. Amazon is selling them for $50 now (50% off)


Edited by jarrett - 7/6/13 at 9:11am
post #10868 of 13414

Hi joker

Do you have any recommendations for something similar to the RE-0 but with more sub-bass? Not a lot, I'm not a basshead, I just want slightly more bass.
Thanks!

post #10869 of 13414
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

Logitech Ultimate Ears 600 review below

 

 

(2C58) Ultimate Ears 600 / 600vi / Logitech UE 600

 

Added July 2013

 

Details: Long-running staple of the UE lineup previously known as the Super.Fi 5

Current Price: $60 from amazon.com (MSRP: $119.99); $120 for 600vi w/mic & 3-button remote

Specs: Driver: BA | Imp: 13Ω | Sens: 115 dB | Freq: 20-20k Hz | Cable: 4' I-plug

Nozzle Size: 4.5mm | Preferred tips: Stock Comply, generic bi-flange

Wear Style: Over-the-ear or straight down

 

Accessories (4/5) - Single-flange silicone tips (3 sizes), Comply foam tips (2 sets), and hard plastic carrying case

Build Quality (3.5/5) - All-plastic construction, color-coded nozzles, and chromed housings are all reminiscent of the lower-end UE earphones. The cable is identical to the one used by the UE 700 - soft and flexible, but plasticky and not very well-relieved

Isolation (3.5/5) - Nozzles are long and lend themselves to deep insertion fairly well. Isolation is good but still lags behind many pricier BA-based earphones

Microphonics (4.5/5) - Quite low in the soft and flexible cable, and can be eliminated completely with over-the-ear wear

Comfort (4.5/5) - The curved shells and long nozzles of the SF5 allow them to be worn either cord-up or cord-down quite easily, though the position of the mic suggests over-the-ear wear. The housings are very light and rarely come in contact with the ear, much like those of the Phonak PFE and Future Sonics Atrio earphones

 

Sound (8.6/10) - Originally known as the Ultimate Ears Super.Fi 5, the single-armature UE 600 took its spot in the UE lineup over from the dual-armature Super.Fi 5 Pro model. Sonically, it differs greatly from its predecessor, taking on a more balanced and accurate sound. At the low end, the UE 600 sounds like a typical single-armature earphone, lacking the enhanced bass of UE’s dynamic-driver models. The bass is very level and controlled, with impact that is on-par with the Etymotic Research HF5 and lags slightly behind the MEElec A161P.

 

The midrange, on the other hand, is more prominent. The UE 600 places the mids front and center. It is still more neutral than the vast majority of entry-level earphones but for me sounds slightly mid-centric, albeit very clear and refined. This could be due to an impedance interaction with my sources, but it is consistent across all of the ones I’ve tried. Tonally, the UE 600 is a touch warmer than the UE 700 and other TWFK-based sets, as well as the Etymotic HF5, but detail and overall transparency are still very good.

 

The top end of the UE 600 is clean and smooth, if not particularly sparkly. The UE can’t quite match the delicacy and detail of the HiFiMan RE-400 but still impresses with the slightly relaxed nature of its treble. There is absolutely no grain and the earphone tends to avoid harshness and sibilance. It is also not overly critical of lower-bitrate files. I would say this was done on purpose due to its low price point, but the flagship UE 900 model has similar tendencies. Admittedly, the UE 900 does have better treble presence, energy, and extension, sounding more natural overall, but there is also a huge price gap in play there.

 

The UE 600 possesses an impressively wide soundstage but doesn’t keep up too well with higher-end earphones. I found it lacking overall dynamics and the separation of higher-end sets such as the quad-driver UE 900 model. As a result, the soundstage has comparatively poor depth and layering and the overall sonic image is a bit flat, much like that of the similarly-priced Creative Aurvana In-Ear 3.

 

Value (9.5/10) - The UE 600 is a little plasticky in build but remains lightweight, comfortable, and fairly well-isolating courtesy of the included Comply eartips. The sound is neutral to somewhat mid-centric, with very good clarity, decent bass presence, and smooth, forgiving treble. It sounds great with music and is especially well-suited for audiobooks and phone calls with its forward, highly intelligible vocal presentation. Simply put, it’s a great fit for anyone in search of a comfortable earphone with excellent mids.

 

Pros: Comfortable form factor; very low cable noise; smooth, yet accurate sound

Cons: Plasticky build quality and typical UE cable; prone to impedance interactions with high-OI sources

 

Have you heard the Vsonic VSD1?  If so, what sound rating would you give it?  Curious whether the Ultimate Ears is now the best sound at $50.

post #10870 of 13414

That price is a discounted one Grayson; if you want to get it at that price, better order fast. Also, I'm praying that the Zero Audio Basso's kick the VSD1's ass, as I've ordered those. If you haven't yet, I suggest you look into those IEMs also beerchug.gif (anyone owning those two? I'd love to hear your opinion on that!)

post #10871 of 13414
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jarrett View Post

Definitely the highest sound quality to lowest price ratio I've seen. Amazon is selling them for $50 now (50% off)

 

Good price although that's a 3rd party seller. Looks like amazon is out of stock. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GForceXIII View Post

Hi joker

Do you have any recommendations for something similar to the RE-0 but with more sub-bass? Not a lot, I'm not a basshead, I just want slightly more bass.
Thanks!

 

Philips Fidelio S1 or VSonic GR07. They have more treble presence than the RE0 as well, but if you don't mind that both have good bass reach and presence but are still balanced-sounding overall.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grayson73 View Post

 

Have you heard the Vsonic VSD1?  If so, what sound rating would you give it?  Curious whether the Ultimate Ears is now the best sound at $50.


I haven't had the VSD1 long enough to have a score in mind yet but I do think it'll score higher than the VC02 and Sony MH1C. The UEs have a very different sound than the VSD1s - a lot more mid-oriented, with less bass and treble. 

post #10872 of 13414
Quote:

Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

Philips Fidelio S1 or VSonic GR07. They have more treble presence than the RE0 as well, but if you don't mind that both have good bass reach and presence but are still balanced-sounding overall.

I can't find the original GR07 anywhere over here, is the mk2 any different?

post #10873 of 13414

Of all the universal IEMs I've tried the UE600 is tied with Phonak's models for the most comfortable.  I have small ears so what works for me might not work for others, but they're very easy to put in place and unlike many others require much less fiddling to stay there.  Also, kudos to the design ethic making the right side red and the left black, there's no eye strained searching for tiny L and R markers.

 

Joker nailed the sonic characteristics dead on.

post #10874 of 13414

Hello, is it better sony MH1C for 44 euro or sony MH1 for 28 euro, or any others for this price?

post #10875 of 13414
Quote:

I haven't had the VSD1 long enough to have a score in mind yet but I do think it'll score higher than the VC02 and Sony MH1C. The UEs have a very different sound than the VSD1s - a lot more mid-oriented, with less bass and treble. 

Have been trying to decide between vsonic gr06 and the vsd1, looking forward to see how you rate them.

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