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Sleeping With Headphones On - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
Just use headphones that cost pocket money and/or some with lifetime warranty. Like ex. a Koss PortaPro
Which others have a lifetime warranty?
post #17 of 29
Sleeping with headphones is a BAD idea. I have been told by a doctor that much ear damage occurs when people are under the influence of alcohol because of them being in a relaxed state, i.e., at concerts or such events where drinking a loud music occurs. This is because there are a set of muscles in the ear that react to loud sounds. When there is loud music, these muscles contract to help protect the ear. When people are drunk, these muscles are so relaxed they don't do their job properly and ear damage occurs. It is my guess that sleeping has a similar effect of relaxing these muscles. I have tinnitus and I have noticed from the times I've fallen asleep listening to my stereo, that I've woken up with the tell-tale sign of ringing - indicating I've over done it. If I had been awake at that moderate volume I know that volume would not have had that effect on my ears (given my prior experience with my listening sessions). So, its my opinion that sleeping with headphones on is lowering your ears natural defenses - opening them to the possibility of damage.
post #18 of 29
I fall asleep with headphones on sometimes. It amazes my wife. But I'm sleeping in my computer chair leaned back. Have fallen asleep with all my headphones one time or another. No biggie.
post #19 of 29
"The tensor tympani muscle and stapedius muscle of the inner ear contract in response to loud sounds, reducing the transmission of sound to the inner ear. This is called the acoustic reflex."

A study: "Shipyard noise is a variable noise which induces permanent threshold shift (PTS) in exposed workers. In humans, the stapedius reflex has been found to be very stable in this type of exposure. Temporary threshold shift (TTS) in the absence of stapedius reflex has been found to extend downwards through the speech-frequencies instead of showing a high frequency dip as when the stapedius reflex is normal. The features of PTS produced by the same type of noise was investigated in rabbits with and without functioning middle ear muscles. The auditory sensitivity was measured by auditory brain stem response (ABR) and by the stapedius reflex response. Middle ear muscle function was blocked by denervation of the stapedius muscle or by general anesthesia. With normal middle ear reflex very little PTS was found. When the muscles were inactivated during the noise exposure the PTS was very extensive and covered the mid frequency range. On the basis of previous findings in humans and the present animal study it is suggested that the features of the stapedius reflex should be considered both in assessment of individual susceptibility and design of optimal acoustic environments."

So basically, not having control of, or the relaxing of the stapedius muscle, opens the ear to hearing loss ("PTS").

So if you want to go deaf, get drunk, crank your tunes and go to sleep with your headphones on.
post #20 of 29
I've tried sleeping with headphones on, but it just doesn't work for me. I don't like the feeling of something on my head when I'm lying down, and I find the direct sound of headphones distracting to sleep. I typically just leave my computer speakers (AV40s) playing in the background, which I find much more relaxing.
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chadbang View Post
"The tensor tympani muscle and stapedius muscle of the inner ear contract in response to loud sounds, reducing the transmission of sound to the inner ear. This is called the acoustic reflex."

A study: "Shipyard noise is a variable noise which induces permanent threshold shift (PTS) in exposed workers. In humans, the stapedius reflex has been found to be very stable in this type of exposure. Temporary threshold shift (TTS) in the absence of stapedius reflex has been found to extend downwards through the speech-frequencies instead of showing a high frequency dip as when the stapedius reflex is normal. The features of PTS produced by the same type of noise was investigated in rabbits with and without functioning middle ear muscles. The auditory sensitivity was measured by auditory brain stem response (ABR) and by the stapedius reflex response. Middle ear muscle function was blocked by denervation of the stapedius muscle or by general anesthesia. With normal middle ear reflex very little PTS was found. When the muscles were inactivated during the noise exposure the PTS was very extensive and covered the mid frequency range. On the basis of previous findings in humans and the present animal study it is suggested that the features of the stapedius reflex should be considered both in assessment of individual susceptibility and design of optimal acoustic environments."

So basically, not having control of, or the relaxing of the stapedius muscle, opens the ear to hearing loss ("PTS").

So if you want to go deaf, get drunk, crank your tunes and go to sleep with your headphones on.
Okay, but say I don't drink before I sleep, don't put the volume high, and don't play loud music, then would I still go deaf because of the stapedius muscle relaxing?
post #22 of 29
Probably not, unless you got one MP3 from someplace WAY LOUDER than the rest like I do.

But then again, ask yourself, "Am I really enjoying the music while I'm asleep anyway?"
post #23 of 29
Try a white noise machine or small speakers maybe?

I've tried sleeping with headphones but I ended up getting too caught up in my music to sleep(punk rock is not a good soundtrack for sleeping ) plus I'd be afraid of getting strangled with the wires.

Don't worry about ear infections as long as you keep your headphones clean. I sleep with earplugs some nights(I like quiet when I sleep) and I don't have ear infections. Just throw out the plugs when they get dirty and gross.
post #24 of 29
I've been sleeping with IEMs for many years and I've never had an ear infection. I keep the tips clean and practice good hygiene. I begin listening at low volume, like 60 dB then drop.
post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
Question, what are IEMs? A type of earphones?
post #26 of 29
Yes. Inner Ear Monitors.
post #27 of 29
I won't sleep with headphones on, afraid of breaking them. But I have no problems sleeping with IEMs.
post #28 of 29
headphones don't allow your ear canals to breathe...I don't think you wanna wear headphones while sleeping on a regular basis.
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flag View Post
Question, what are IEMs? A type of earphones?
In Ear Monitor - Earphones which mount into your ears.
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