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Does a good stereo receiver count as a "headphone amp"? - Page 5

post #61 of 88
I'm new to all of this so I'll not state an opinion just a quick FYI from my searching.
I see one of the selling points for PeachTree audio is their integrated amps have a dedicated head amp included. They are the only ones I've seen so far make that claim as far as I've found anyway.
I'm glad I found this thread, as I'm considering GS1000 phones and an expensive head amp, but when I wake up from that dream I will probably end up with 325i and a $400 shelf stereo from Denon I've been checking out.
post #62 of 88
my pm7001ki is advertised as having a proper headphone out too, if memory serves me right. I think that they (integrated headphone amps) can get you a far way if you have a decent amp.
post #63 of 88
My HD650's did not sound very good out of the recievers I tried, maybe it was because I was using the built in DAC but it was not very good.
There are much better headphones out there for use without a dedicated headphone amp.
post #64 of 88
I actually plugged my W2002 into my Onkyo TX-SV515PRO receiver last night, and the sound was pretty impressive. Big, fun, airy, in some ways more so than my Yamamoto, though I know from experience that the Yamamoto is simply carrying the sound sig of my M24. The Onkyo's major flaw was the noise floor--the background was a long, long way from black.
post #65 of 88
The Outlaw 2150 receiver has a very very good headphone amp. I use both that and my stand alone. Outlaw very powerful.
post #66 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylab View Post
Some (maybe most?) home theater receivers, however, use a very cheap, crappy op-amp to drive it's headphone jack - they do NOT power the headphones of of the power amps in the receiver. And a bad op-amp in a bad circuit will sound bad, regardless of what housing it's being used in.
Can we have your evidence? I know for a fact that virtually all STEREO receivers and integrateds use an attenuated line off the power amps, but I'm not familiar with HT amps. And assuming you're right and the manufacturers use op-amps, are you sure they're "crappy" op amps?
post #67 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbacic View Post
My HD650's did not sound very good out of the recievers I tried, maybe it was because I was using the built in DAC but it was not very good.
Could you explain this? I'm not sure I understand.
post #68 of 88
I do not see why it should not.
Considering it has a dedicated headphone out, or you have headphones suitable for the speaker out.
post #69 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by pp312 View Post
Can we have your evidence? I know for a fact that virtually all STEREO receivers and integrateds use an attenuated line off the power amps, but I'm not familiar with HT amps. And assuming you're right and the manufacturers use op-amps, are you sure they're "crappy" op amps?
You've missed the point of my post completely - I wasn't trying to say that ALL HT amps do use an op-amp , OR that the op-amps are all crappy. What I was saying is that there is no way to know what you're getting unless you ASK!

But let me give one example. I inquired about the headphone out of a very expensive tube line stage made by McIntosh. I thought it was pretty reasonable to expect that it would be driven off the tubes, but I wanted to be sure. So I asked. And guess what - NOPE. The headphone jack is op-amp based. So when you listen to headphones from this very expensive all-tube linestage, you're listening to a SS, op-amp based headphone amp. Now, there are lots of great op-amps, and maybe the McIntosh headphone amp sounds great - but it ISN'T what you might very reasonably expect it to be. That was all I was saying.
post #70 of 88
I think my Shure SRH840's sound great powered by my cheapo Rotel RA-01. I have no basis for comparison other than my Cowon iAudio D2/Fiio E5. Am I insane?
post #71 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorrofox View Post
Am I insane?
You have been a member of HeadFi since 2005. Probably yes.

Sorry, you make it too easy.
post #72 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLR1 View Post
You have been a member of HeadFi since 2005. Probably yes.

Sorry, you make it too easy.
Are you saying I need to get out more?

I've passed on your details to my mistress, you're in trouble now mate.

post #73 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ypoknons View Post
I actually think you can get significant improvement in SS amps by going from $250/350 to $500-$800ish amps. I've tried amps in the former price range (most recently Compass without the DAC), and they are quite clearly outclassed by the Burson or the EAR90 (K701 tested, HD650 and T1 included). I think it has to do with the minimum quality of components and some price drops from some excellent SS amps not getting as much attention as new products take the limelight (HP100*, EAR90, GCHA). Tubes are different matter, different criteria...

Edit - that said, I have not listened a $1000 SS amp in a long time, and I didn't know how to listen for as well as I do now. I'm just saying the jump between the two price ranges is rather substantial for SS amps.

* Price drop here; price raise in the US
Yeah, like said, would love to check out a more expensive amp. The most expensive headphone amp I've listened to is around the $250 dollar range. Like I said, at that price point integrated stereo amps are about equal in performance, so no real benefit. I'm thinking to hear a benefit I'd have to move up to the $500 range... and I don't feel like spending that much just yet.
post #74 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superpredator View Post
I actually plugged my W2002 into my Onkyo TX-SV515PRO receiver last night, and the sound was pretty impressive. Big, fun, airy, in some ways more so than my Yamamoto, though I know from experience that the Yamamoto is simply carrying the sound sig of my M24. The Onkyo's major flaw was the noise floor--the background was a long, long way from black.
This is the same problem my Pioneer receiver had. Too much noise. That was one thing the Little Dot MkII had over it. But when it came to the actually quality of the sound, despite having that extra background noise I still preferred the sound of the Pioneer all things considered. But just slighty. And depending on my mood the LD2 would be better.
post #75 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mochan View Post
Yeah, like said, would love to check out a more expensive amp. The most expensive headphone amp I've listened to is around the $250 dollar range. Like I said, at that price point integrated stereo amps are about equal in performance, so no real benefit. I'm thinking to hear a benefit I'd have to move up to the $500 range... and I don't feel like spending that much just yet.
There's no need to be defensive, I've read what you said. I just meant that $500 is good price to hear an improvement for SS amps, that's all.
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