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Crack;Bottlehead OTL - Page 363

post #5431 of 7980

Keep your chin up brother. Thoughts and prayers with you. 

post #5432 of 7980
Matt and others, if your hearing issues occurred relatively quickly as opposed to gradual noise or age induced hearing loss, you might want to look into chiropractic and myotherapy support.

I suffered a moderate-severe case of Bells Palsy about 2 years ago. With it came a hearing loss in my left ear and tinnitus in both. Doctors and audiologists were no help unfortunately, but through chiropractic visits and a bit of self experimentation I've discovered that my issues are caused by spinal compression and imbalances caused by sitting at a computer too long with poor posture/ergonomics. I can actually create tinnitus now by moving my neck in certain ways that must increase tension / pressure in the muscles around the spine which proves the problem is transient and muscular in origin.

Long story not-so-short, myotherapy massage sessions (which were very uncomfortable at first due to years of tension I wasn't even aware of) and some chiro adjustments have my body showing daily improvements. I'm back to about 90% right and the next steps will be gradual, but achievable with consistent stretching, exercise and occasional professional support.

Sorry for the long, off-topic post, but as a fellow lover of music with a deep understanding of the body's abilities to heal many things, I wanted to share in the hope that IF your situation is recoverable you have every chance to continue enjoying the wonders of music. If course, if the cause is one that's unrecoverable then I thoroughly agree with palmfish's approach of finding the other joys in life and walking on...
post #5433 of 7980

Thanks for sharing Loquah. That type of discussion is always appropriate here IMHO. I attribute the cause of my issues to firing a gun several times with no hearing protection. After that event, I got my first symptoms the very next day. 

 

I'm open to all forms of therapy. I've been to the ENT for treatments 6 times. He didn't tell me anything that I hadn't learned from the internet already. 

post #5434 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by NightFlight View Post

 

As for sonics, one could argue that solder is part of the chain and has impact on the same order as changing cables. It breaks in just like any other solid conductor.  But then, were getting into the hazy area of quarks and gremlins.

 

Precisely. No audible difference. No break in - and if anything less effect than cables would have, since they are larger conductive surfaces (less resistance) and infrequent. 

post #5435 of 7980
Good point Loquah and well stated.

Everyone is different (obviously) and I believe that, at least in my case, my tinnitus is a result of a combination of factors. Noise induced hearing loss and neural plasticity are closely related, but I too can change my tinnitus by moving my neck and or jaw. It is also affected by my diet and the quality of my sleep.

The truth of the matter is that doctors and scientists are still mostly ignorant about the nature of tinnitus today. Fortunately (or unfortunately) it is becoming a more common and serious problem in our society and it is getting a lot of attention from the medical/scientific community.

I don't have hopes for a cure or significant relief in my lifetime, but I do believe the generation behind me will have a solution.
post #5436 of 7980
Matt, in my experience, ENT's are among the most ignorant group of professionals WRT tinnitus. An audiologist is your best bet for help (and hearing aids).

Do some reading on neural plasticity and tinnitus...
post #5437 of 7980

Doing some research now. Thank you kindly. 

post #5438 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattTCG View Post
 

Thanks for sharing Loquah. That type of discussion is always appropriate here IMHO. I attribute the cause of my issues to firing a gun several times with no hearing protection. After that event, I got my first symptoms the very next day. 

 

I'm open to all forms of therapy. I've been to the ENT for treatments 6 times. He didn't tell me anything that I hadn't learned from the internet already. 

 

Firing guns taught me something about physiology and hearing.  Sighting a rifle with hearing protection on is a terrifying experience for me.  But out in the field, firing a rifle after sprinting for your prey, without protection (can't stalk if you can't hear), it sounds more like back round noise.  Could easily start critiquing the sound quality of various rifles, shotguns and ammo. 

 

Its weird, when thoroughly warmed up, no ringing, no issues and apparently no pain.  But cold with protection and its terrifying.  I wonder if adrenaline can protect your hearing for short moments.  Firing a rifle in the field is actually a rare occurence, a clean shot can be very hard, try holding a rifle or shotgun still after sprinting.

 

But that is not why I am here.  I wanna know if anybody has used the crack as a preamp?  Am tossing between an all out 300b bottle head for speakers or a tube preamp.  It doen't help after listening to my HD650s on the reference rig and realising that its too good a headphone to not give it the amp it needs to shine.

post #5439 of 7980
Crack as preamp for speaks? I think you better go with Decware CSP amps for that
post #5440 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by SP Wild View Post
 

 

Firing guns taught me something about physiology and hearing.  Sighting a rifle with hearing protection on is a terrifying experience for me.  But out in the field, firing a rifle after sprinting for your prey, without protection (can't stalk if you can't hear), it sounds more like back round noise.  Could easily start critiquing the sound quality of various rifles, shotguns and ammo. 

 

Its weird, when thoroughly warmed up, no ringing, no issues and apparently no pain.  But cold with protection and its terrifying.  I wonder if adrenaline can protect your hearing for short moments.  Firing a rifle in the field is actually a rare occurence, a clean shot can be very hard, try holding a rifle or shotgun still after sprinting.

 

But that is not why I am here.  I wanna know if anybody has used the crack as a preamp?  Am tossing between an all out 300b bottle head for speakers or a tube preamp.  It doen't help after listening to my HD650s on the reference rig and realising that its too good a headphone to not give it the amp it needs to shine.

 

That's interesting to read, SP, but it makes complete sense.

 

There is a reflex in the ear (called the stapedius reflex) which is designed to dampen the acoustic information transmitted from the ear drum to the cochlear (and the easily damaged components there-in). My guess is that the near-complete silence of hearing protection allows the ear to relax this protection to a greater level making the very loud (relatively) concussion of a rifle shot quite traumatic (in terms of our perception versus the peace and quiet before the shot) even with hearing protection. It would make sense that adrenalin and the natural survival reactions of the body in that state would tighten the stapedius muscle and prepare the body for various environmental onslaughts including loud noises.

 

As you say, warming up is important - essentially these are still muscles, connective tissues and moving parts at work and need to be eased into whatever we're doing - a good argument for always starting your Crack sessions at lower volume and gradually building to your prime listening volume over a few minutes (see how I brought my wild tangent back to the thread topic? ;))

post #5441 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loquah View Post
 

 

That's interesting to read, SP, but it makes complete sense.

 

There is a reflex in the ear (called the stapedius reflex) which is designed to dampen the acoustic information transmitted from the ear drum to the cochlear (and the easily damaged components there-in). My guess is that the near-complete silence of hearing protection allows the ear to relax this protection to a greater level making the very loud (relatively) concussion of a rifle shot quite traumatic (in terms of our perception versus the peace and quiet before the shot) even with hearing protection. It would make sense that adrenalin and the natural survival reactions of the body in that state would tighten the stapedius muscle and prepare the body for various environmental onslaughts including loud noises.

 

As you say, warming up is important - essentially these are still muscles, connective tissues and moving parts at work and need to be eased into whatever we're doing - a good argument for always starting your Crack sessions at lower volume and gradually building to your prime listening volume over a few minutes (see how I brought my wild tangent back to the thread topic? ;))

 

I guess your wink was directed at my tendency to wade into a thread, totally OT after lurking and finding a post I could comment on with personal experience?  Then again I don't think it is totally off track, if it this that prompts me to engage in communication with members of more experience.  Mainly, I've been lurking because 300b amps are raved about, and the most affordable iteration is the Bottlehead unit.

 

This sterilised version of head-fi has me a little concerned.  Nevertheless, I shall be on my merry way in search for more information to help make my next big ticket item purchase decision....a glowing sweet botlle of music.  Nedd to put words into action, have been speaking of this purchase forever but never quite committed, an integrity thing for me, one must do what one says one will do.

 

:o

post #5442 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loquah View Post
 

 

That's interesting to read, SP, but it makes complete sense.

 

There is a reflex in the ear (called the stapedius reflex) which is designed to dampen the acoustic information transmitted from the ear drum to the cochlear (and the easily damaged components there-in). My guess is that the near-complete silence of hearing protection allows the ear to relax this protection to a greater level making the very loud (relatively) concussion of a rifle shot quite traumatic (in terms of our perception versus the peace and quiet before the shot) even with hearing protection. It would make sense that adrenalin and the natural survival reactions of the body in that state would tighten the stapedius muscle and prepare the body for various environmental onslaughts including loud noises.

 

As you say, warming up is important - essentially these are still muscles, connective tissues and moving parts at work and need to be eased into whatever we're doing - a good argument for always starting your Crack sessions at lower volume and gradually building to your prime listening volume over a few minutes (see how I brought my wild tangent back to the thread topic? ;))


I'm not sure about any type of hearing protection that affords near-complete silence, at least in relationship to moderate to high noise levels. I also suffer from tinnitus after 25+ years in the air separation business, which as part of the process uses air compressors, turbines, etc. A lot of this equipment is in the 100-130 dB range when 10-30 feet away.

 

I would often even double up hearing protection in the noisiest environments, using both the expandable foam type ear plugs, as well as the over-the-ears type muffs. Even so, it could be quite noisy. Sometimes when time was of the essence, I would go near equipment for a time without any protection. I know, bad idea, but at those times it was to get the job done quickly, or to prevent process upsets or get into production more quickly. When you're 25, I guess you don't think about the impact many years down the road.

 

Anyway, the damage done is pretty much irreversible at this point. When laying down at night to go to sleep in a fairly quiet atmosphere I can hear a tone that seems to be coming from inside my head. It has been that way for at least ten years now, and I have become somewhat accustomed to it. Fortunately, I am still able to enjoy my music, both through headphones and loudspeakers. Maybe not as much as if I didn't have the tinnitus, but I'm thankful for the enjoyment that I still am able to experience.  

 

I guess what should be taken from this, is that although hearing protection can't entirely shield you from high noise environments, it is important to take the best precautions that are available to preserve your hearing.

post #5443 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by SP Wild View Post
 

 

I guess your wink was directed at my tendency to wade into a thread, totally OT after lurking and finding a post I could comment on with personal experience?  Then again I don't think it is totally off track, if it this that prompts me to engage in communication with members of more experience.  Mainly, I've been lurking because 300b amps are raved about, and the most affordable iteration is the Bottlehead unit.

 

This sterilised version of head-fi has me a little concerned.  Nevertheless, I shall be on my merry way in search for more information to help make my next big ticket item purchase decision....a glowing sweet botlle of music.  Nedd to put words into action, have been speaking of this purchase forever but never quite committed, an integrity thing for me, one must do what one says one will do.

 

:o

 

Oh, no it wasn't - sorry if it seemed that way. I was joking about the fact that my last few posts had been way OT and I was feeling guilty so I found a sneaky link back to the topic. One of the things I love about this thread (and most of Head-Fi) is the willingness of members to discuss relevant, but sometimes tangential, topics. I hope I didn't make you feel censored at all as I enjoyed your post and found your experiences very interesting.

post #5444 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by SP Wild View Post
I wanna know if anybody has used the crack as a preamp?  Am tossing between an all out 300b bottle head for speakers or a tube preamp.  It doen't help after listening to my HD650s on the reference rig and realising that its too good a headphone to not give it the amp it needs to shine.

The Crack can work as a preamp, but I would think the Smash or even Quickie would be better as a preamp. Actually pretty sure somewhere on their website they say the Quickie is better as a preamp than Crack. If you're only looking for preamp use, the new Smash is about the same price as Crack+Speedball. If you want both a headphones amp and a preamp, then maybe get Crack. Since you're into the 300B, I'm sure you've given the BeePre a look. The Smash is supposed to be trickle down technology of the BeePre, but no 300B tube. After hearing the Smash in my chain, I too am thinking about the BeePre. :p

post #5445 of 7980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loquah View Post
 

 

Oh, no it wasn't - sorry if it seemed that way. I was joking about the fact that my last few posts had been way OT and I was feeling guilty so I found a sneaky link back to the topic. One of the things I love about this thread (and most of Head-Fi) is the willingness of members to discuss relevant, but sometimes tangential, topics. I hope I didn't make you feel censored at all as I enjoyed your post and found your experiences very interesting.


Aha, so we are more alike than different.  I did feel a little like you might be having a go....but I'm a little edgey on this matter, because I have a history and tendemcy to OT discussions, and you wouldnt be the first to pick me out on that one.

 

But y'know, changing is SOO hard, especially when you know for a fact that this personality flaw is totally harmless in the bigger scheme of things.

 

So how about that 300b hey?

 

:smile:

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