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Crack;Bottlehead OTL - Page 259

post #3871 of 7977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussiejuggalo View Post


So chisel tip is easier then pencil for this kinda stuff? I use a pencil on wire, thats about as far as my soldering knowledge goes biggrin.gif

Gonna probably get flamed... what does flux do again? I forgot lol redface.gif

One good thing with my soldering iron is it can do 30 or 60w, I dont have one of those fancy soldering stations just a good ol' wall plug cool.gif

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post
 

 

Fluxcapacitor = more jiggawatts.

 

LOL

 

Flux is the liquidy stuff that helps the solder to flow onto the joints and make a strong connection

post #3872 of 7977
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post

Fluxcapacitor = more jiggawatts.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Loquah View Post

Flux is the liquidy stuff that helps the solder to flow onto the joints and make a strong connection

Ah ok, I was gonna ask if it was something like that, thanks biggrin.gif

1 more question, seeing the crack is a tube amp can it run for say 16 hours non stop or does it have to be turned off to allow the tubes to cool? I really am a n00b with audio redface.gif
Edited by Aussiejuggalo - 2/24/14 at 6:21pm
post #3873 of 7977

A chisel tip basically just offers more surface area and more mass to hold heat (and thus more heat transfer).

 

Flux is a heat activated mild acid paste that cleans the surface of the materials you want to join so the solder will actually flow/stick to the surface (oxidized/dirty surfaces will not heat properly and repel solder).

 

edit: ah whoops, didn't notice the answer was already on the next page :rolleyes:

post #3874 of 7977

Flux is a cleaning agent basically, dissolves grease and oxidation from the surface of metals to ensure a good clean surface to bond to.  I highly recommend you buy rosin core leaded solder, i.e. with the flux built in.   The flex pens are really only useful for circuit board use.

 

/edit: also way too slow...


Edited by mcandmar - 2/24/14 at 6:30pm
post #3875 of 7977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post

A chisel tip basically just offers more surface area and more mass to hold heat (and thus more heat transfer).

Flux is a heat activated mild acid paste that cleans the surface of the materials you want to join so the solder will actually flow/stick to the surface (oxidized/dirty surfaces will not heat properly and repel solder).

edit: ah whoops, didn't notice the answer was already on the next page rolleyes.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcandmar View Post

Flux is a cleaning agent basically, dissolves grease and oxidation from the surface of metals to ensure a good clean surface to bond to.  I highly recommend you buy rosin core leaded solder, i.e. with the flux built in.   The flex pens are really only useful for circuit board use.

/edit: also way too slow...

hahaha yeah both to slow but still thank you none the less biggrin.gif
post #3876 of 7977

It's not too slow really, and it's especially helpful if you're a beginner with soldering. One quick dab could save you from a bad joint, and you'll see that solder flow like water :)

 

Better for a beginner to spend some extra seconds dabbing than troubleshooting. To the contrary, I use flux more with point-to-point than a PCB, the flux in core is adequate for the boards 99% of time. You have a lot of surface area for the flux to cover with those terminals though.


Edited by brunk - 2/24/14 at 8:11pm
post #3877 of 7977

I'm in the habit of very lightly tinning most of the terminals before I even start wiring. Apply some flux to everything, get some solder on the iron tip, then very quickly and lightly touch it to everything. It's really not necessary for most jobs, but it does make the work easier sometimes.

post #3878 of 7977
Quote:
Originally Posted by brunk View Post

It's not too slow really, and it's especially helpful if you're a beginner with soldering. One quick dab could save you from a bad joint, and you'll see that solder flow like water smily_headphones1.gif

Better for a beginner to spend some extra seconds dabbing than troubleshooting. To the contrary, I use flux more with point-to-point than a PCB, the flux in core is adequate for the boards 99% of time. You have a lot of surface area for the flux to cover with those terminals though.

Thats true, I have found when I solder wires together less is more, to much and it kinda turns to crap... or just turns black redface.gif

Yeah I'd rather spend extra time soldering and making sure its right then quickly building it and have something go wrong eek.gif plus I gotta be careful seeing my hands really arnt that steady redface.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post

I'm in the habit of very lightly tinning most of the terminals before I even start wiring.

Doesnt lightly tinning then soldering mean its a much stronger and more conductive bond?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post

Apply some flux to everything, get some solder on the iron tip, then very quickly and lightly touch it to everything. It's really not necessary for most jobs, but it does make the work easier sometimes.

I also thought that was the "correct" way to solder anyway

Side note I tried soldering some old 22AWG wires just to see how it would go, really small black spots where I guess it burnt? and yellow spots guessing flux?, but they all more or less came out nice and shiny biggrin.gif... think its time to get me some crack cool.gif
post #3879 of 7977

Pre-treating/tinning/fluxing isn't necessary. Most of the time flux-cored solder is sufficient to get everything to flow. Myself, I often find myself lacking in extra hands, since I'll have one hand holding the iron and the other is holding whatever component/wire/thingamajig in place. So since I can't bring in the solder wire, I'll tin the surfaces then add a dab of flux and then bring in some solder on the iron tip and let it wick itself into the joint.

 

One if these days I'll have to get myself a proper set of "helping hands". The $5 one I have is a piece of junk that's only good as a paperweight.

post #3880 of 7977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post

Pre-treating/tinning/fluxing isn't necessary. Most of the time flux-cored solder is sufficient to get everything to flow. Myself, I often find myself lacking in extra hands, since I'll have one hand holding the iron and the other is holding whatever component/wire/thingamajig in place. So since I can't bring in the solder wire, I'll tin the surfaces then add a dab of flux and then bring in some solder on the iron tip and let it wick itself into the joint.

One if these days I'll have to get myself a proper set of "helping hands". The $5 one I have is a piece of junk that's only good as a paperweight.

Ah yeah I can see how that would be easier. Sometimes I end up just holding the solder in my mouth... is that bad? tongue.gif

I got helping hands biggrin.gif kinda useful but for something like the crack maybe not so much

I think I forgot to ask this earlier, my DT880s are the the 250 ohm versions... thats not a problem for this amp is it? I read that it really love 600 ohm ones better confused.gif
post #3881 of 7977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussiejuggalo View Post

1 more question, seeing the crack is a tube amp can it run for say 16 hours non stop or does it have to be turned off to allow the tubes to cool? I really am a n00b with audio redface.gif

 

Mine has been running 16hrs a day for the last 8 weeks while I've been doing some capacitor testing with no problems. It is raised up about 8 mm on some feet so there is some air flow underneath. The air temps is around 16-20 degree C in the house. I have been using some cheap headphones and tubes for testing and my other half looks in on it from time to time and has a listen while I am at work. Its feed radio or random play via server.


Edited by JamieMcC - 2/24/14 at 11:48pm
post #3882 of 7977
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamieMcC View Post

Mine has been running 16hrs a day for the last 8 weeks while I've been doing some capacitor testing with no problems. It is raised up about 8 mm on some feet so there is some air flow underneath. The air temps is around 16-20 degree C in the house. I have been using some cheap headphones and tubes for testing and my other half looks in on it from time to time and has a listen while I am at work. Its feed radio or random play via server.

So I guess no problems with tubes getting to hot and exploding them? tongue.gif
post #3883 of 7977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussiejuggalo View Post


So I guess no problems with tubes getting to hot and exploding them? tongue.gif

lol, unless you're using some kinda nuclear caps

post #3884 of 7977

I see there are a lot of positive impressions of the Crack with the HD 800. Does everyone still feel that way about it? Worth the price of admission?

post #3885 of 7977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonido View Post


I'll check the fuse again. Might as well replace it since I have spares. I'm using 0.5 amps slow blow because I blew the original fuse due to a short when I first finished building the Crack, and I wanted to get a 1 amp slow blow, but Radioshack only had 0.5 amp and it worked fine.
 

Glad to hear you figured it out.

 

Does the kit come with a slow blow fuse? Personally, I would not use a slow blow fuse unless that was specified by BH. I would also never use a larger value than specified (though you can use a smaller value if that works).

 

 

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