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Motorcycle-Fi - Page 19

post #271 of 385

^ I've had that on the back burner for a couple of years for a cool "city bike". Was just checking and apparently the Yamaha and Kawasaki 250s are discontinued, and so are the SM series Husqvarnas (which is what I really wanted).

post #272 of 385

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post #273 of 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Pa View Post

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I love the HUsky! Did you just buy that??! That is exactly what i have in mind when i go motard next year

 

 

post #274 of 385

Husky was always the nick for Husqvarna--have things changed? I can imagine it has, with the foreign sale of Husqvarna, and the start-up of Husaberg by ex-Husqvarna designers. 

 

I need to check for local Husaberg support but with Husqvarna, a red gas tank is like a green Kawasaki if you know what I mean.

post #275 of 385

yeah.. getting my names mixed up. You are right.

post #276 of 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by sachu View Post


I love the HUsky! Did you just buy that??! That is exactly what i have in mind when i go motard next year

 

 



Yup, Husaberg, and they're now being imported ans supported by KTM.  It's an FE 570, street legal and one of the gnarliest dual purpose bikes I could find. beerchug.gif

 

post #277 of 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphaphoenix View Post

The Isle of Man takes some serious balls, more so than riding any MotoGP or Superbike circuit.  The road conditions and the chance of flying through someone's living room window takes serious balls indeed.  I for one, would never go that fast around residential streets and dairy land. 



I respect the Isle of Man and it will always be the iconic.  But after seeing what these guys are doing at the Macau GP, I think a new level of insanity has been set.  These guys don't care about balls as it transcends the notion of having big balls to race on city streets next to office buildings and running inches away from steel guard rails.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSVCpHRtRAQ

 

post #278 of 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Draygonn View Post

Had a friend who lowsided after hitting a pothole (wasn't used to his steel braided brake lines). He was dragged in a twisted position when his ankle was caught under the bike. Fortunately he was wearing racing gear or he would have been really bad off.
Here is my CBR600F3 at Newcombs Ranch for a MotoGP race. Its been my primary since '03, sold my M3 convertible because it wasn't getting much use. LA traffic suuucks and we can lane split. My car gets relegated to bad weather and hauling stuff. The odometer broke around 65k but she's still running good as new.
264



I'm finding it hard to believe steel braided brake lines contributed to the crash.  Especially a low side.

 

post #279 of 385

Piecing together a 2011 CRF450R for Supermoto :) Offloading some audio equipment to cover the cost. Too many expensive hobbies! :(

post #280 of 385

^ You're going to race.

post #281 of 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by zx10guy View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Draygonn View Post

Had a friend who lowsided after hitting a pothole (wasn't used to his steel braided brake lines). He was dragged in a twisted position when his ankle was caught under the bike. Fortunately he was wearing racing gear or he would have been really bad off.
Here is my CBR600F3 at Newcombs Ranch for a MotoGP race. Its been my primary since '03, sold my M3 convertible because it wasn't getting much use. LA traffic suuucks and we can lane split. My car gets relegated to bad weather and hauling stuff. The odometer broke around 65k but she's still running good as new.
264



I'm finding it hard to believe steel braided brake lines contributed to the crash.  Especially a low side.

 



 

Sounds like he locked up his back brake.

post #282 of 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post



 

Sounds like he locked up his back brake.

 

Without being there, I don't know.  But I can say the use of the back brake is gotten more people in trouble than it is worth.

 

The excuse that the steel braided lines contributed to the crash....I'm not buying it.  Steel braided lines only help with brake feel and keeping the lever pull firmer and more consistent.  I have two bikes.  One with steel braided lines from the factory and one without.  I have no problems moving back in forth between the bikes; especially when I first got my Ducati 848 the one with the braided lines.

post #283 of 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by zx10guy View Post



 

Without being there, I don't know.  But I can say the use of the back brake is gotten more people in trouble than it is worth.

 

The excuse that the steel braided lines contributed to the crash....I'm not buying it.  Steel braided lines only help with brake feel and keeping the lever pull firmer and more consistent.  I have two bikes.  One with steel braided lines from the factory and one without.  I have no problems moving back in forth between the bikes; especially when I first got my Ducati 848 the one with the braided lines.



 

What, front brake shy or feathering speed after the apex?

 

I would have bought a bike by now but fear my mojo is gone already, after spending some time on a friends 696. 

post #284 of 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post



 

What, front brake shy or feathering speed after the apex?

 

I would have bought a bike by now but fear my mojo is gone already, after spending some time on a friends 696. 


Not sure what you're saying about the front brake.  But some track/racers use the back brake in the corners to help turn in the bike more.  I have never done this as there is really no room for error.  Using the front brake in a corner also needs to be done with some caution.  While I have lightly touched the front brake to help scrub some speed in a corner while leaned over, I have also pulled the front brake more than I wanted to because of some issue in front of me.  The first thing your bike will want to do is stand right up.  Extremely scarey.
 

 

post #285 of 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by zx10guy View Post


Not sure what you're saying about the front brake.  But some track/racers use the back brake in the corners to help turn in the bike more.  I have never done this as there is really no room for error.  Using the front brake in a corner also needs to be done with some caution.  While I have lightly touched the front brake to help scrub some speed in a corner while leaned over, I have also pulled the front brake more than I wanted to because of some issue in front of me.  The first thing your bike will want to do is stand right up.  Extremely scarey.
 

 



Have done both..And both are scary enough to make you crap yourself. 

 

I have lost some of my confidence after going down 4 times this season. 

 

 

But I am eager to get on the bike and keep riding. THis time be a little smarter and dial it down two notches and concentrate on basics.

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