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Matrix M-Stage amp review: simple, cheap, and excellent. - Page 241

post #3601 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post


Power supply noise filtering.
RFI/EMI.


OK, I understand. Do you use it in yours? I see that you have q701 which is quite similar to k701.

post #3602 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by muxamed View Post


OK, I understand. Do you use it in yours? I see that you have q701 which is quite similar to k701.

 

No I don't.

Maybe I'll try it out sometime!

post #3603 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post

No I don't.
Maybe I'll try it out sometime!

OK smily_headphones1.gif But don't you think this op is a bit too bright? Maybe it needs a bit burn-in.
post #3604 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by muxamed View Post


OK smily_headphones1.gif But don't you think this op is a bit too bright? Maybe it needs a bit burn-in.

 

Maybe I'm a closet treblehead or something like that, but no, I don't find the LM4562 to be too bright.

Dunno, you could try the burn in thing.

I like the clarity.

I guess you might like a Class A modded OPA627?

I seem to remember thinking it was a bit too warm.

post #3605 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post

Maybe I'm a closet treblehead or something like that, but no, I don't find the LM4562 to be too bright.
Dunno, you could try the burn in thing.
I like the clarity.
I guess you might like a Class A modded OPA627?
I seem to remember thinking it was a bit too warm.
Yep the opa627 class a mod is a bit warmer sounding.
post #3606 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by muxamed View Post


Not only k701 sounds brighter in treble and leaner in bass. Even hd650 does and even my friend's DT880. What is acomplished by soldering that capacitor? Smoothing of some kind? Or is it low-pass filtering?

 

Improved stability.  Gets rid of FR inconsistencies, loose or lean bass, and more.  You just get improved sound, there's really no downside to it unless you like coloration, and more improvement than class-A biasing could ever do with any modern opamp.

A LPF would have to be thrown into the signal path, not power supplies.

 

I take it a little farther with my favorite chips.

 

Edit: I really doubt that burn-in applies to chips much.  I've never been able to hear a difference except with AD797.

(Although I think that that was just my imagination, lol.)


Edited by Mad Max - 1/26/13 at 8:39pm
post #3607 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Max View Post

 

Improved stability.  Gets rid of FR inconsistencies, loose or lean bass, and more.  You just get improved sound, there's really no downside to it unless you like coloration, and more improvement than class-A biasing could ever do with any modern opamp.

A LPF would have to be thrown into the signal path, not power supplies.

 

I take it a little farther with my favorite chips.

 

Edit: I really doubt that burn-in applies to chips much.  I've never been able to hear a difference except with AD797.

(Although I think that that was just my imagination, lol.)


Thanks. It sounds interesting. I suppose you mean soldering a capacitor between pins 4 and 7? Wouldn't it be practically easier to make this bypass somwhere in the rectifier part of the amplifier?

 

I have never heard any benefits either when it comes to electronic parts, not more than an hour or so.

post #3608 of 4842

I've been trying to decide what gain setting to use the M-Stage when paired with the Sennheiser HD-650...

 

Does the gain essentially determined the power output of the amp? For instance, would setting the gain at its max (20 db), mean the amp is outputting power to its maximum? If so, since the amp can output and power up to 600 ohm headphones, would setting the gain at 20 db mean the amp is always outputting 600 ohm at that setting?

 

Or is power output just determined by how much the headphone needs at the moment?

 

I ask, because currently I kind of prefer the HD-650 with the gain at 20 db with the M-Stage, but I'm afraid this might be outputting too much power (more specifically, the 600 ohms, as mentioned earlier) to the headphones.

post #3609 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzybaffy View Post

I've been trying to decide what gain setting to use the M-Stage when paired with the Sennheiser HD-650...

 

Does the gain essentially determined the power output of the amp? For instance, would setting the gain at its max (20 db), mean the amp is outputting power to its maximum? If so, since the amp can output and power up to 600 ohm headphones, would setting the gain at 20 db mean the amp is always outputting 600 ohm at that setting?

 

Or is power output just determined by how much the headphone needs at the moment?

 

I ask, because currently I kind of prefer the HD-650 with the gain at 20 db with the M-Stage, but I'm afraid this might be outputting too much power (more specifically, the 600 ohms, as mentioned earlier) to the headphones.

 

Hi. The ohm value is the impedance of the headphones, a sort of "resistance" they give to the rest of the circuit (in this case the amplifier). The higher the impedance the more voltage (and the less current) the headphones need to reach the same power level because the power is, in a sense, a ratio between voltage and resistance (impedance). A certain power is needed to reach a certain sound level (dB). Increasing the gain you are practically increasing the voltage at given setting of a volume potentiometer. At the same time there is more distortion from the circuit.

post #3610 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzybaffy View Post

I've been trying to decide what gain setting to use the M-Stage when paired with the Sennheiser HD-650...

 

Does the gain essentially determined the power output of the amp? For instance, would setting the gain at its max (20 db), mean the amp is outputting power to its maximum? If so, since the amp can output and power up to 600 ohm headphones, would setting the gain at 20 db mean the amp is always outputting 600 ohm at that setting?

 

Or is power output just determined by how much the headphone needs at the moment?

 

I ask, because currently I kind of prefer the HD-650 with the gain at 20 db with the M-Stage, but I'm afraid this might be outputting too much power (more specifically, the 600 ohms, as mentioned earlier) to the headphones.

 

 

 

Whenever you have selectable gain settings, its always the best thing to leave the gain as low as possible.  So, dont put the gain all the way up and then have the volume knob at 20-30% because everything above is too loud.  Rather put the gain as low as possible. If the sound is not loud enough for you when you have the volume knob close to 100%, or turned all the way up, then increase the gain.


Edited by derbigpr - 1/27/13 at 10:49am
post #3611 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by muxamed View Post

 

Hi. The ohm value is the impedance of the headphones, a sort of "resistance" they give to the rest of the circuit (in this case the amplifier). The higher the impedance the more voltage (and the less current) the headphones need to reach the same power level because the power is, in a sense, a ratio between voltage and resistance (impedance). A certain power is needed to reach a certain sound level (dB). Increasing the gain you are practically increasing the voltage at given setting of a volume potentiometer. At the same time there is more distortion from the circuit.

 

I see. Thanks for letting me know. So basically, the ohm value determines how much voltage the headphone requires from the amp to achieve a certain volume level. 

 

Are the voltage increases a gradual thing, with respect to the actual volume? Or is it just a constant setting, according to the gain setting?

 

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by derbigpr View Post

 

 

 

Whenever you have selectable gain settings, its always the best thing to leave the gain as low as possible.  So, dont put the gain all the way up and then have the volume knob at 20-30% because everything above is too loud.  Rather put the gain as low as possible. If the sound is not loud enough for you when you have the volume knob close to 100%, or turned all the way up, then increase the gain.

 

 

Why? Does it do damage to the headphones?

post #3612 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzybaffy View Post

 

I see. Thanks for letting me know. So basically, the ohm value determines how much voltage the headphone requires from the amp to achieve a certain volume level. 

 

Are the voltage increases a gradual thing, with respect to the actual volume? Or is it just a constant setting, according to the gain setting?

 

It's a gradual thing depending on volume setting.

post #3613 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by muxamed View Post

 

It's a gradual thing depending on volume setting.

 

I see. Sorry, one more question.

 

So does this mean the amp is providing the same amount of power to the headphones, if the actual volume is the same, across different gain settings? So, different gain settings, but the same actual volume means the power is still the same?

post #3614 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzybaffy View Post

 

I see. Sorry, one more question.

 

So does this mean the amp is providing the same amount of power to the headphones, if the actual volume is the same, across different gain settings? So, different gain settings, but the same actual volume means the power is still the same?


Yes smile.gif

post #3615 of 4842
Quote:
Originally Posted by muxamed View Post


Yes smile.gif

 



I see... then... (sorry, one more question...) What accounts for the different sound at different gain settings, but same volume? Because, it seems to me the 10 db setting sounds a little different than the 20 db setting (at the same volumes). Is it just my imagination, or are there other factors besides just power in that situation?

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