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My wooden rack - Page 2

post #16 of 61
Sadly, this approach is more flexy than true jointery, but I'll post a pic or two of applicable furniture I've made over the years. But, it will probably be the wildest flexy done around here.

Heretical to build CD racks, but since Home Depot stocks 1/4" red oak stock in standard 2' lengths, that is perfect material for CD shelves. I built one like that, but twisted it ever so slightly in the clamps - close, but, not quite right.

Hall of shame:

Birdseye maple component rack



CD rack - Texas mesquite (with rosewood shelves)


Red oak cd rack (with a small twist)
NOTE: This was built with all off the shelf red oak boards (4" x 7/8" and 3" x 1/4" stock)



And, of course, the raw material for my pending flexi mini-rack - jatoba
post #17 of 61
Just a quick note -- I have a custom entertainment center done in pine, and while it's gorgeous I find it's way too vibration sensitive. It's great for headphone listening, and if nobody's moving around. But my 20 lb cat jumping off a table across the room is enough to make a record skip.

I'd stick a nice pair of feet on the bottom to be sure.

I'm planning a new table for the record player and I'm considering strand bamboo planks. I'm unsure of its acoustic properties, but it's one of the hardest, most durable materials out there.
post #18 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gitbags View Post
To answer oneplustwo and Voodoochile, its assembled with 8mm dowel and alot of glue. Unfortunately I'm not adept in true joinery, but give me time
Doweling makes a good joint. It might not be as esoteric as mortise and tenon, but it's still a very strong joint. Far better than screws/nails/glue alone, like so much furniture these days.

It looks great, and I bet it's pretty rigid.
post #19 of 61
really nice, simple and strong looking
post #20 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pabbi1 View Post
Sadly, this approach is more flexy than true jointery, but I'll post a pic or two of applicable furniture I've made over the years. But, it will probably be the wildest flexy done around here.

Heretical to build CD racks, but since Home Depot stocks 1/4" red oak stock in standard 2' lengths, that is perfect material for CD shelves. I built one like that, but twisted it ever so slightly in the clamps - close, but, not quite right.

Hall of shame:

Birdseye maple component rack
Some beautiful work there pabbi1.
Absolutely nothing wrong with the flexy design over joinery, I nearly went that way myself but my local B&Q where out of 12mm threaded rod.
I look forward to seeing the results and wish you all the best in you endeavor.

I have to say I really like that component rack, the wood has a beautiful grain. Shame My local diy stores don't supply anything other than pine

dasmb, I'm way ahead of you on the feet I just got to get round to ordering some suitable spikes. Fortunately (or unfortunately, depending how you look at it) I don't own a record player so I can't comment on any vibration issues just yet. Be sure to let us know what you settle on for your new table.

Voodoochile, Well its held together thus far And I must admit it wasn't rigid until I added the diagonal batons, but know its pretty solid and thanks to the removable shelve tops weighs a ton.
post #21 of 61
Thread Starter 
Cheers googleborg, slightly off topic but looking at your sig I see you've listed van damme cable. Assuming your in the UK or Europe, where do you source your cable from? do you buy it on the drum or cut lengths?
post #22 of 61
Pabbi1 do you have any tips for working with the birdseye maple ? I have some on the way Handpick Exotic Wood Online - Bell Forest Products Im just making a small mount for little hand crank musical movement. What did you find worked well finishing wise also ? thanks its nice work btw I would take it over the mass-produced stuff in a second.
post #23 of 61
nice job. i much prefer it to a Fraim .
post #24 of 61
got my tenoning jig from grizzly today... building some Stokke style high chairs for the twins. next up... entertainment center. anyone ever put a little fan in their cabinets? I'm thinking a beta22 and beta24 in the same place is going to be generating some good heat and would like to make sure I don't have anything over heating. Obviously, something quiet would be first priority. Easy and cheap would be nice as well.
post #25 of 61
Depends entirely on the maple - this birdseye is rather soft, unlike the rock maple, but it all works really well - Les Pauls have maple tops, which speaks to how well it machines, and finishes.

Oddly, all woods work the same, with good sharp tools. The real delta is in the finish - sanding and sealing. I use only real tung oil in 3-5 coats depending on the porosity of the material, and the time of the year (temperature), but oil is the surest easiest finish, and with maple, analine dyes are a lot of fun.
post #26 of 61
pabbi - what brand of tung oil do you use? I've only tried one brand and it seems to work ok but I'm not sure what I'm missing. also, do you burnish with 0000 steel wool at the end? I've tried that but have been happier with just leaving it be.
post #27 of 61
Thanks Pabbi1 good advice I will just let the wood do its thing and act accordingly. I have a 1989 les paul standard with tobacco sunburst maple face actually funny you should mention it with the arch its pretty thick.
post #28 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneplustwo View Post
pabbi - what brand of tung oil do you use? I've only tried one brand and it seems to work ok but I'm not sure what I'm missing. also, do you burnish with 0000 steel wool at the end? I've tried that but have been happier with just leaving it be.
Al and I have discussed this...He uses pure Tung oil, but I happen to like a modified Tung oil finish. It's mostly all Tung oil, but has hardeners and Urethane for durability.

First use a sealer, I like this...

Buy Seal-a-Cell Clear Finish, Pint at Woodcraft.com

One coat is plenty, then follow up with 3-5 coats of this...

Buy Satin Arm-R-Seal, Quart at Woodcraft.com

I like to buff with 0000 steel wool between each coat, but leave the final coat as is. It should be glass smooth by then.

This is the same finish I used on both of these projects with excellent results...



post #29 of 61
Dr Wood speaks true - one other thing I have seen for smaller products is microabrasives - like 1500-15000 grit. That is smoother than glass, and literally creates a mirror finish on the wood, probably so much as to look more like a plastic. I may try that with this, if I can find the right stuff.

Now all we are missing is Smeggy's input.
post #30 of 61
Nice one (OP), I like the clean and simple look to it!
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