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How much freq. do you hear? (20-20000) - Page 4

post #46 of 67
Most of you who claim hearing past 15k or so are hearing harmonics mostly.....
post #47 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by flibottf View Post
Most of you who claim hearing past 15k or so are hearing harmonics mostly.....


Unless the tone is created by a tone generator, pretty much all non electronic music above 5K is harmonics, that is a given, but I would not want my hearing to cut out at 5K

Try it yourself, bung a music wav file into Cool Edit pro or Audacity and apply a low pass filter at 5K, the difference should be pretty obvious. At 15K a low pass filter is much less damaging if noticeable at all.

For me a 13K low pass is almost undetectable - even if I can hear a pure 15K tone , just about.
post #48 of 67
I also wonder how life is for that Japanese SONY boss...what could it be like to hear up to 30kHz? you know the very faint whine CRT's make, would it be VERY loud for him? having a natural LPF starting at 16/17kHz is more of a benefit than anything else IMHO.
post #49 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by leeperry View Post
I also wonder how life is for that Japanese SONY boss...what could it be like to hear up to 30kHz? you know the very faint whine CRT's make, would it be VERY loud for him? having a natural LPF starting at 16/17kHz is more of a benefit than anything else IMHO.
Kind of a nice way to see it! I like that!
I don't know how high I can hear, never been to an audiologist, but I'm able to enjoy music, that's all that matters to me.
post #50 of 67
My useful range is about 45 Hz - 15.5 kHz in left ear and 40 Hz - 16.2 kHz in right ear. At very low volumes, I can detect a roll off in my left ear above 12.5 kHz (3-5 db) that is not there in my right ear and so I can hear treble noticeably better with my right, especially at high volumes. This can be quite irritating. I am 21.

When I experiment with FFT filter in Cool Edit Pro, I can still detect a low pass filter with my left ear at 14 kHz. When I cut out everything above 12 kHz music sounds a good deal more muffled. With my right I can hear music content at 15-16 kHz that I cannot with my left, but the difference seems to be very small.
post #51 of 67
your brain will adjust between your ears imbalance IMO, as it happens to be a terrific DSP...it will compensate to still be able to locate sound in 3D towards your head, even if the FR of each ear is much different.
post #52 of 67
17khz
i'm 17 too.. =(
but hearing loss runs in my family so I guess I should just accept it.
I've never lived in a noisy setting and have never played loud music/listened to music for more than like 30 minutes at a time
post #53 of 67
mine is pretty bad. its a good thing, it shows that i should not bother with high end audio equipments.
post #54 of 67
I could hear 19khz but on the 48Khz test I could hear the 22Khz quite easily... I'm 18.

Also to my utter surprise I scored 10/10 on the 0.5db Level Difference test!
post #55 of 67
Ive just looked through this thread and the average must be around 18-19KHz (or 22 if you include Mr Nobutosi Kihara!!).

This is way above average.

It's an interesting insight into human phychology how this thread has attracted mostly respondants who have above average hearing.
post #56 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by nick_charles View Post
The vast majority of musical energy is below 5K, there are no fundamentals on piano or violin above 5K. Harmonics may extend to 50K or even 100K but they are very low in energy and not missed. I am 51 and my hearing stops at about 15K but it has never stopped my appreciation of music.

There were some experiments back in the late 70s (MURAOKA, YAMADA, AND YAMAZAKI, 1978) where music rich in high frequencies (above 20k) was played back on speakers which had a range to 35K and different low pass fillters were added to cut off the higher frequencies.

Only when the filter was set at 14K did some of the listeners reliably detect the low pass filter, at 16K nobody reliably detected it.

So relax !
That was certainly informative and assuring. Thanks!
post #57 of 67
10 Hz - 24.5 kHz
post #58 of 67
~18kHz (29 years old)
post #59 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by flibottf View Post
Most of you who claim hearing past 15k or so are hearing harmonics mostly.....
That word... I don't think it means what you think it means.

Overtones are a physical acoustical phenomenon, not a psychoacoustic one. That is to say, in order to hear them, one must have functioning hair cells in that frequency range, same as they would in order to hear fundamentals at that frequency.

Furthermore, if I recall correctly, sine waves (which I assume most folks are using for this test) don't produce harmonics.

As far as my hearing goes, I'm a mutant. I can pick up ~26kHz in my left ear and ~24kHz in the right. I'm 27. Keen hearing without hearing loss runs in my family. As far as bass frequencies go, I can hear 13Hz, but at that point, the diaphragms of my cans make a loud flapping noise that sounds like things breaking, so I was afraid to go lower.

I highly doubt it increases my appreciation of music. I may possibly be able to pick up a bit more timbral detail than most folks. But it mostly just means I have to wear earplugs to sleep. I can hear customers walking into the coffee shop while washing dishes, so that's pretty sweet, I guess.

I often wonder how much the upper limits of hearing are physical and how much neurological. My vision is 20/480, and I didn't get glasses until I was 8. I also I have a problem with coalescing the two images in each eye into a single image (my right eye drifts inward). I have a prism in my glasses to correct this, but the first year I had glasses the prescription was reversed, so I was seeing double. Long story short, I was fairly dependent upon my hearing as a child. Then I studied music composition in college, so between ear training and score study with recordings, I developed my ear further.

Whoa, that was a rambling piece of autobiography. My apologies to anyone who read that.

My point is that, in this age of ubiquitous electronics, with lights, power cables, and a plethora of lit-up rectangles surrounding us all day, it seems reasonable that the brain would start discarding those pervasive high frequencies as unnecessary information. So perhaps instead of damage to the hair cells, most folks' brains are simply not turning the vibrations into sound?
post #60 of 67
I'm curious... will have to get mine checked. Where can this be done?
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