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Blues for Beginers

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
So I love music by Eric Clapton and bands like Led Zepplin but I would like to get into some more traditional Blues music. Where should I start.

Thanks for any help.
post #2 of 31
SRV !

Proud member of Facebook group I hate helicopters because they killed Stevie Ray Vaughan

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post #3 of 31
I like the old Delta/Piedmont stuff. Robert Johnson, Son House, Blind Willie McTell... the recordings are bad but it has so much feeling
post #4 of 31
Nice one for preview ...

+ YouTube Video


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post #5 of 31

Kenny Wayne Shepard, Blues from the Back Road
Amazon.com: 10 Days Out (Blues from the Backroads)/ (CD/DVD): Kenny Wayne Shepherd: Music

This is truly a great blues album, very well recorded with an accompaning DVD that's very entertaining. Visit the link to listen to some cuts.
post #6 of 31
A nice place to start would be with the blues guitarists the British blues musicians listened to back in the 60s - that would primarily be Otis Rush, Buddy Guy and Magic Sam.

Of course, Muddy Water and Howlin Wolf would be essential listens too.

As stated by posters above, Stevie Ray Vaughan is great too. I would also opt for some Michael Bloomfield as he was supposed to be America's version of Eric Clapton back in the 60s. Johnny Winter is also nice.
post #7 of 31
Jimi!
post #8 of 31
Eric Clapton got just about all his sh-t from Robert Johnson. Start with King of the Delta Blues Singers.

Another good place to start are the two volumes of Chess Blues Classics.

Last thing: Elmore James - Shake Your Moneymaker: The Best of the Fire Sessions
post #9 of 31
You should check out an album called "Chulahoma", done by a band called The Black Keys. It is raw blues and is pretty sweet. The songs are actually all covers of the late Junior Kimbrough's work. You should check him out if you like Chulahoma; definately what I would call traditional blues.
post #10 of 31
Thread Starter 
This is fantastic guys! Looks like I've got a lot of listening to do. Can't wait to get started.
post #11 of 31
Another good one is B.B. King. In fact, there is a great album of him and Eric Clapton playing together.
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post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by komi View Post
Nice one for preview ...

+ YouTube Video


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he's blazing in that... but for real SRV-as-bluesman... you want something like this:

+ YouTube Video


mm hm.
post #13 of 31
or this right here. yeah, that's what i'm talkin about. damn.

+ YouTube Video


holy turds.
post #14 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by tru blu View Post
Eric Clapton got just about all his sh-t from Robert Johnson. Start with King of the Delta Blues Singers.

Another good place to start are the two volumes of Chess Blues Classics.

Last thing: Elmore James - Shake Your Moneymaker: The Best of the Fire Sessions
x2





Jimmy Dawkins is quite an easy introduction to more blues, good sounding new recordings.




A great album from Willie Dixon




Some nice DVD's to check out that will get your familiar with a lot of artists:

Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues - A Musical Journey (2003)

Amazon.com: Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues - A Musical Journey: John Mayall, Carl Lumbly, Taj Mahal, Mya, John L. Demps Jr., Richard Pearce, Leticia Giffoni, Alex Gibney, Belinda Clasen, Belinda Morrison, Jeff Scheftel, Lisa Day, Margaret Bodde,

The American Folk Blues Festival vol 1-3

Amazon.com: The American Folk Blues Festival 1962-1966, Vol. 1: Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker: Movies & TV

Amazon.com: The American Folk Blues Festival 1962-1966, Vol. 2: Willie Dixon, Memphis Slim: Movies & TV

Amazon.com: The American Folk Blues Festival 1962-1969, Vol. 3: Muddy Waters, Big Mama Thornton, Bukka White, Memphis Slim: Movies & TV
post #15 of 31
I'm kind of shocked there is no mention of Taj Mahal up on here, he has some pretty good stuff. I find myself listening to him and B.B. King most of the time. There is traditional blues, and then there is some of the music that people don't usually think of as blues, such as Ray Charles.
Keb' Mo', Johnny Lang, Odetta, Bessie Smith, Paul Michael, Safhire, Bonnie Raitt, Bob Dylan, John Lee Hooker, Joan Osborn, just to name a few.

The more you progress in time the more you see rock and blues mixing. You can define the two by the distinct beats (suck as the 12 step beat). More so, blues, folk, rock, soul, country (old non-pop) and jazz are all linked together, it's hard to tell what is and isn't. Such as the the early Beatles recordings are arguably blues songs, as well as with other rock bands

Blues is what you want it to be, it's music (to me at least) that has a good beat, tells a story, and above all carries the most emotion from the soul out to the listener.
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