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Best "mastered" albums of the decade? - Page 5

post #61 of 235
^ Good for you man, stick to your guns. Hopefully your example may be followed by others.
post #62 of 235
LFF, there's so many albums i want you to remaster!!! like every single one in my collection lol
post #63 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoupRKnowva View Post
LFF, there's so many albums i want you to remaster!!! like every single one in my collection lol
Hehe. I would be more than happy to. See my website for more info. Of course, if they are copyrighted, I have restrict you to one copy due to "fair use" laws.
post #64 of 235
LFF, in general, how long does it take you to re-master an average 70 minute album?

Are you allowed to divulge any of the albums you have remastered?
post #65 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dublo7 View Post
LFF, in general, how long does it take you to re-master an average 70 minute album?

Are you allowed to divulge any of the albums you have remastered?
On average - a 4-5 minute song can take up 20 - 30 minutes if it has no major problems (noise, drop outs, etc).

PM on the albums...
post #66 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFF View Post
How is it that I can hear them and FIX them and nobody else has?
Archive your remasters in a way that they can be discovered in 141 years when the copyright finally expires. Music lovers and historians in the year 2151 will be all excited about the newly discovered LFF remasters of music from the decades of the loudness wars. Someone's gotta do it because the people who currently own the copyrights don't appear to be interested in making their music available to the present and the future in the best possible quality.
post #67 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ham Sandwich View Post
Archive your remasters in a way that they can be discovered in 141 years when the copyright finally expires. Music lovers and historians in the year 2151 will be all excited about the newly discovered LFF remasters of music from the decades of the loudness wars. Someone's gotta do it because the people who currently own the copyrights don't appear to be interested in making their music available to the present and the future in the best possible quality.
+1

It's shame there's so much music I just can't listen to very often (I love the composition, lyrics, etc.) a/c poor SQ.
post #68 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ham Sandwich View Post
Archive your remasters in a way that they can be discovered in 141 years when the copyright finally expires. Music lovers and historians in the year 2151 will be all excited about the newly discovered LFF remasters of music from the decades of the loudness wars. Someone's gotta do it because the people who currently own the copyrights don't appear to be interested in making their music available to the present and the future in the best possible quality.
I archive everything I do.

Don't know if it will be heard by anyone else other than myself...but hey...it's worth a shot.
post #69 of 235
Here are my recommendations – All original-master CDs unless stated otherwise.
And I can’t resist commenting on the music quality as well, as they’re all timeless IMO.

Attachment 26412 Diana Krall – The Girl In The Other Room.
My gold standard for top sound quality from the last decade. Musically great too, but different enough from her usual American Songbook stuff that it lost many of her traditional followers. So if jazz is more your scene, then try A Night In Paris.

Attachment 26413 Patricia Barber – The Premonition Years.
3-CD retrospective, re-mastered in 2007, allegedly to a higher standard than the superb originals. Can’t do any comparisons, but this set sounds uniformly excellent. Very minimalist, aloof, musical style, but don’t let all those audiophile demos put you off a great artist.

The above two are in a higher SQ league than the rest below, but there’s only so much late night, mellow, jazz/pop sophistication one can take. So, let’s move on to… late night “frontier” country music…

Attachment 26414 Grey DeLisle – The Graceful Ghost.
Atmospheric production that evokes an era from long ago. And Grey sings with a passion to melt the coldest heart. Too much passion actually – she occasionally overloads the recording equipment – I assume that’s what’s caused the very occasional slight distortion.

Still too quiet for you? Then let’s turn the volume up a bit…

Attachment 26415 New Pornographers – Challengers.
Includes a few turns from the wonderful Neko Case. Great all round sound and music. But still not that loud, so it’s time to turn it right up to 11…


Attachment 26416 White Stripes – Elephant.
You wouldn’t necessarily expect great sound quality from a noise merchant like Jack White. But in this case, you’d be wrong. It’s got quirky duets, air guitar blow outs, an outrageous Dusty Springfield cover and, in Seven Nation Army, possibly the best kick-start to a rock album - ever.
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post #70 of 235
All of the above recordings are AWESOME musically speaking although I haven't heard DeLisle. However, sonically - except for the DeLisle (which I haven't heard), they all distort and contain way too much compression.

However, you're in luck Mr. Attorney! The UK vinyl pressing of Elephant is off the charts in terms of sound quality!
post #71 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFF View Post
All of the above recordings are AWESOME musically speaking although I haven't heard DeLisle. However, sonically - except for the DeLisle (which I haven't heard), they all distort and contain way too much compression.
Interesting. If the Diana Krall album is way too compressed, then all I can say is that compression doesn't bother me that much. Compared to detail, transparency and lack of "glare". On my headphones, her voice sounds so real, I could reach out and touch her (inside my head so to speak). Her voice has been close miked, with lots of reverb, but that doesn't harm the end result for me.

I don't try to analyse such things scientifically, but for convenience, I use my Nagra CDC's modulometer (analogue voltmeter) to give a very rough approximation of dynamic range, and it does swing reasonably widely, compared to playing a real horror like Californification - watching the needle almost stationary on that is scary.

I'll have to try some of your recommendations to understand this better. Tool is already on my wish list. Is that Rebecca Pidgeon album also okay on redbook?
post #72 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAttorney View Post
Interesting. If the Diana Krall album is way too compressed, then all I can say is that compression doesn't bother me that much. Compared to detail, transparency and lack of "glare". On my headphones, her voice sounds so real, I could reach out and touch her (inside my head so to speak). Her voice has been close miked, with lots of reverb, but that doesn't harm the end result for me.

I don't try to analyse such things scientifically, but for convenience, I use my Nagra CDC's modulometer (analogue voltmeter) to give a very rough approximation of dynamic range, and it does swing reasonably widely, compared to playing a real horror like Californification - watching the needle almost stationary on that is scary.

I'll have to try some of your recommendations to understand this better. Tool is already on my wish list. Is that Rebecca Pidgeon album also okay on redbook?
The Diana Krall isn't brickwalled to the horrors of Californication...and thank heavens! The Krall album has peak compression/limiting and that is the distortion that is present. There is some dynamic range there, hence why you see the needle swing so much. There is no reason to analyze these things...it's just some people can hear them and some can't. I sometimes wish I couldn't hear these things. It drive me (and friends and family) crazy.

Watch these videos to understand the loudness wars a bit:

YouTube - The Loudness War

YouTube - Why I Don't Buy "Remastered" CDs.

I think the Rebecca Pidgeon album should be fine on Redbook.
post #73 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bmac View Post
The MFSL version of Sea Change by Beck is a pretty nice sounding album.
Absolutely, although it seems to slightly slower than the original release for some reason. The songs are several seconds longer, and there's a slightly lower shift in tone. I'm not sure why that is, did they decide the original was too "fast", or is it a mistake?
post #74 of 235
No. 6 - BERLIOZ - Symphonie Fantastique(Dudamel, conductor) (released May 20, 2008)



This is an awesome recording in terms of dynamics. Sound quality is excellent throughout. If I had to nitpick - I would only complain about the EQ work a bit, as it definitely doesn't sound as natural as it should. However, as I said - that is me nitpicking. The performance is amazing throughout and I highly recommend it.

While not on CD, it is readily available as a digital (LOSSLESS!!!) download HERE

stay tuned for more....
post #75 of 235
Here's a thread about the mastering of Chinese Democracy on gearslutz, interesting stuff;

Guns n' Roses - Chinese Democracy - Gearslutz.com

LFF - what do you think of the mastering on this particular album?
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