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Burn-in from a low-quality source

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
I'm thinking of burning-in my RE0, but the only practical way for me is to hook it up to my computer with its onboard audiocard, which isn't anywhere near good quality. There is a substantial amount of hiss when I plug it in. Will this in any way affect the burn in, or is it completely safe?
post #2 of 30
Burn-in is a myth.
post #3 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Demonic_Pope View Post
I'm thinking of burning-in my RE0, but the only practical way for me is to hook it up to my computer with its onboard audiocard, which isn't anywhere near good quality. There is a substantial amount of hiss when I plug it in. Will this in any way affect the burn in, or is it completely safe?
Seriously, the burn-in is not going to do anything. Just listen to them and your ears/brain will adjust. The sound is not going to change.
post #4 of 30
Objectively, burn-in probably doesn't exist. However, psychological burn-in definitely occurs.
post #5 of 30
If you burn in an earphone, make sure to connect it by the highest quality of cables. I suggest anything over 400$ - that should do it. But make sure all burn files are at least 16 bit FLAC. Not ALAC, not WAV, not OGG - they must be FLAC. Otherwise, your earphone could end up stunted in its FR.

I would also suggest hooking it up to an amp from one of Headfi's sponsors as those will by far, be the best way to burn a pair of new earphones in.

People who suggest just listening to earphones, when that certainly is not what they were designed to do, are mistaken. An earphone is meant to sit next to a source, occupying space and blasting music out at slightly louder than normal volumes for hundreds of hours. This process, like calibrating a laptop battery should be completed every couple of months. Failure to do so will mean a build up of memory in the earphone.

None of my earphones ever ever get time in my ears other than about 5 hours per week. Then while they are rotating in burn in along with my troublesome sources, I listen to a different earphone. But not a one has had less than 600 hours of burn in before I listen.

To prove it is a reality, I test it with a new earphone of the same type. Completely different. In fact, even the expensive IE8 sounds worse than an iPod earbud when out of the box. Some may chalk that up to manufacturer anomaly - hogwash. It has everything to do with vibrating the speakers millions of times - then and only then will earphones sound the way they are meant to.
post #6 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by shigzeo View Post
If you burn in an earphone, make sure to connect it by the highest quality of cables. I suggest anything over 400$ - that should do it. But make sure all burn files are at least 16 bit FLAC. Not ALAC, not WAV, not OGG - they must be FLAC. Otherwise, your earphone could end up stunted in its FR.

I would also suggest hooking it up to an amp from one of Headfi's sponsors as those will by far, be the best way to burn a pair of new earphones in.

People who suggest just listening to earphones, when that certainly is not what they were designed to do, are mistaken. An earphone is meant to sit next to a source, occupying space and blasting music out at slightly louder than normal volumes for hundreds of hours. This process, like calibrating a laptop battery should be completed every couple of months. Failure to do so will mean a build up of memory in the earphone.

None of my earphones ever ever get time in my ears other than about 5 hours per week. Then while they are rotating in burn in along with my troublesome sources, I listen to a different earphone. But not a one has had less than 600 hours of burn in before I listen.

To prove it is a reality, I test it with a new earphone of the same type. Completely different. In fact, even the expensive IE8 sounds worse than an iPod earbud when out of the box. Some may chalk that up to manufacturer anomaly - hogwash. It has everything to do with vibrating the speakers millions of times - then and only then will earphones sound the way they are meant to.
Don't listen to this crazy man.

You'll need 24 bit source material and an equally amazing sound reproduction system (card, ha!) before you can really get the most out of your earphones (and that's just for burn-in). Remember, without this your earphones aren't even good as paperweights - they're far too light.

All kidding aside, if you want to burn them in just run them through your music library overnight. Whether or not burn-in actually exists, one night of that should do it for your RE0s.
post #7 of 30
If the ritual, tradition and ceremony of "burn-in" appeals to you, go ahead and do it. You won't hurt anything.

But don't expect it to be anything other than ritual, tradition and ceremony.

Whether you throw a $500,000 wedding or get hitched in front of the county judge, you're still married.
post #8 of 30
lol this is something that head-fi will never agree on. Some believe it and some dont. Try for yourself and see if you believe it. If it works, great! If not, then oh well.
post #9 of 30
If you believe in the voodoo that mechanical energy will change a mechanical system over time, then deep base played loudly will provide said energy in the shortest time.

post #10 of 30
I think the question is not 'does change happen', the question is 'is it perceptible'.
post #11 of 30
LOL. No need to burn in as listening will get then there but I've never found anything worthwhile that didn't change over time. BAs change less and take longer to do so but they also benefit. It is free and you can do it when you weren't listening. $400 cables not required. Of course you could just listen while you work. No problem using that source as long as nothing's clipping. Ask me about firewire cables sounding different with good files and JET topology. Ducks.
post #12 of 30
One day I will learn how to spell 'bass'. sheesh
post #13 of 30
well RE0 is a dynamic driver however ;p When I first got the RE0 however I didn't notice too much change from out of the box.
post #14 of 30
To answer the actual question asked versus smacking the poor OP silly the answer is your sound card will be just fine as a source for burning in your RE0. You can use special downloaded files like pink/white noise or simply set up your favorite music software on your computer to play a wide variety of music and leave it sit over night.

Personally I let new headphones burnin over night for the first couple of days and wear them during the day when I I normally use them. Depending on the IEM I notice small to no difference with some as they burnin and huge changes with others (usually the biggest change happens with the first 8-20hrs).
post #15 of 30
My RE0s had noticeable sibilance out of the box on certain songs, but now after using them for a couple months they are much smoother and have no sibilance at these parts on these same songs. I did this testing on the same songs, from the same source, at the same volume. If this is not evidence of burn-in then I don't know what is... there's definitely no way I psychologically imagined the reduction in sibilance because I notice the sibilance again it as soon as I try other IEMs.

Burn-in is real. To what extent it makes a difference, that's a matter of debate. Will it be 300 times better after burn in? Likely not... but will there be a difference? I find it hard to argue with the evidence...
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