Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › Can the effects of cables be demonstrated with equipment other than audio?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Can the effects of cables be demonstrated with equipment other than audio?

post #1 of 50
Thread Starter 
If cables make a perceptible change in audio equipment, it stands to reason that they would produce similar effects in other equipment.

Would it be possible to test an "audiophile" power cord against a regular power cord in powering a light bulb? Would it be possible to see the difference? Would it be possible to use a very sensitive light meter to measure a difference in light output or quality between the two power cords?

Similarly, what if you used the two cords to power an electric motor? Would you be able to demonstrate a difference in how the motors run? This might be applicable to audio because some people use specialty power cords with the electric motors in their turntables. I suppose it would also apply to electric motors that spin CDs, as well.

If the effects of cables apply only to audio, then why is that? Wouldn't a similar phenemenon happen with a light bulb or LED? If not, why not? Why would a power cord improve sound in a turntable yet have no effect on the AC motor in the turntable?
post #2 of 50
Eric,
I've mentioned this before. My Power Plant Premier shows the voltage being fed into it. I have one cord I use that when plugged in shows an almost constant voltage of 121, and another cord that shows an almost constant voltage of 119. If there were no differences in cords, this wouldn't be happening.
post #3 of 50
Video - Projectors, DVD, Blu-Ray and upconvertors
I have not preceived any changes though others have reported some.

All unmeasured, unproven and yada yada.
post #4 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by IPodPJ View Post
Eric,
I've mentioned this before. My Power Plant Premier shows the voltage being fed into it. I have one cord I use that when plugged in shows an almost constant voltage of 121, and another cord that shows an almost constant voltage of 119. If there were no differences in cords, this wouldn't be happening.

Do you precieve any diffeneces in the sound?
post #5 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by IPodPJ View Post
Eric,
I've mentioned this before. My Power Plant Premier shows the voltage being fed into it. I have one cord I use that when plugged in shows an almost constant voltage of 121, and another cord that shows an almost constant voltage of 119. If there were no differences in cords, this wouldn't be happening.
This here just proves it. In audio the electricity is turned into sounds, so the difference is always different between users as we all have different ears and so on. But in electronics measurements can be made, and if a higher quality material or cable is going to give more acurate and realiable results then it will get used.
post #6 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by IPodPJ View Post
Eric,
I've mentioned this before. My Power Plant Premier shows the voltage being fed into it. I have one cord I use that when plugged in shows an almost constant voltage of 121, and another cord that shows an almost constant voltage of 119. If there were no differences in cords, this wouldn't be happening.
How long did you test it, what parts of the days, etc? What were the lengths, materials used, shielding, brands, etc etc?

We need more information otherwise there's far too many variables.
post #7 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by IPodPJ View Post
Eric,
I've mentioned this before. My Power Plant Premier shows the voltage being fed into it. I have one cord I use that when plugged in shows an almost constant voltage of 121, and another cord that shows an almost constant voltage of 119. If there were no differences in cords, this wouldn't be happening.
V=IxR. Assuming that your electricity source is stable, the only thing that is altering with your voltage is the resistance, your cable in this instance (as all other components stay the same). R=sRxL/D, where R is resistance of the wire, sR is the resistivity (don't know if that's the wright word), L is the length of the wire and D is the cutting trajectory.
No wire is by means the same. Nobody ever said that (as far as I know of). The only thing in the audio world is the relevance between price and presumably better cables. As 'normal' cables aren't that different in these matters. What makes them better? And on what ground are they standing on? Those are my personal questions.. I believe a cable can make a difference, but what are the manufacturers thinking about and altering when making such a cable?
post #8 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by IPodPJ View Post
Eric,
I've mentioned this before. My Power Plant Premier shows the voltage being fed into it. I have one cord I use that when plugged in shows an almost constant voltage of 121, and another cord that shows an almost constant voltage of 119. If there were no differences in cords, this wouldn't be happening.
But can you HEAR a difference? I don't think ANYBODY would care if the voltage is different if there is no audible difference. I would bet you a LOT of money you couldn't tell the difference in a DBT.
post #9 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Necrolic View Post
But can you HEAR a difference? I don't think ANYBODY would care if the voltage is different if there is no audible difference. I would bet you a LOT of money you couldn't tell the difference in a DBT.
What does a different voltage mean, soundwise? Even if the difference would be huge, what difference would it make? Higher voltage, means higher resistance, means higher ohm, means more power needed to drive? But I mean.. In a cable, this would mean almost close to nothing?

edit: Just to get back on track. Going on with cables and other equipment. I would say, yes. Depending on what cables we're talking about too, and how different they are from each other... A stupid example, if you were to put a really tin wire in between a high voltage line.. I think your cable wouldn't really last that long, so that definitely shows an effect of a cable with other equipment than audio .
post #10 of 50
My flux capacitor will only let me go as far back as 1975 without a proper power cable
post #11 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pltinum View Post
What does a different voltage mean, soundwise? Even if the difference would be huge, what difference would it make? Higher voltage, means higher resistance, means higher ohm, means more power needed to drive? But I mean.. In a cable, this would mean almost close to nothing?

edit: Just to get back on track. Going on with cables and other equipment. I would say, yes. Depending on what cables we're talking about too, and how different they are from each other... A stupid example, if you were to put a really tin wire in between a high voltage line.. I think your cable wouldn't really last that long, so that definitely shows an effect of a cable with other equipment than audio .
in a power cable voltage shouldnt make a difference, the power supply of the unit, be it a DAC or amp, should filter anything coming in to oblivion. But voltage in an interconnect is amplitude of the wave, voltage determines how "loud" the signal is.
post #12 of 50
My large collection of female sex toys runs much more smoothly with fancy power cables.
post #13 of 50
Of course cables make a difference but you have to remember that in audio they don't since we are dealing with a 0-20kHz signal.
post #14 of 50
I have done simple ABX testing with and without using PS Power Premier, and I hear NO difference at all, plugging directly to wall wart. That was exactly what was said from the owner himself too.

I've done ABX testing using his Ref1 + Transporter + PS Power to my Ref1 only. Using exactly same headphone and amp and etc, NO difference what so ever.

To me, the power plants and cables didn't do a jack.
post #15 of 50
if i look inside myself, and i'm be brutally honest here, i WANT to replace all my cables, i want thick chunky cables and big solid looking plugs coming out of a huge box that is regenerating my AC supply and supplying pure sinewaves all over the place. damn it i want a thick copper rod drove a mile into the ground to supply a pure earth and another thrust into the ionosphere, my amp driven by volts from Zeus's lightning. But not because it would sound better, it's to satisfy this innate male craving i have involving thick tubes and inserting thick rods and gushing pure amperage being turned into sonic bliss. i'm being serious, forgive any innuendo, but there is a reason why all these cables are so damn thick and adorned with fat plugs. or am i mad?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Sound Science
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › Can the effects of cables be demonstrated with equipment other than audio?