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Are CDs obsolete - Page 2

post #16 of 191
I buy CDs just for the hell of having the CD. It's nice to have the song on my computer, but I want to be able to see a hard copy of the music. And it's just sitting there, so I'm not afraid of scratches.

Even if they offered album downloads to the same quality as the CD, I would buy the CD. Deep Funk got it right. Quality has nothing to do with the reason I buy CDs.
post #17 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2410 View Post
and while im at it im really sick of americans whineing about woe is them cds (like everything else) are soooooo expensive. oooohhhh nooooo poor you, go have a look what the rest of the world pays.
Who's whining now? FWIW, hearing about how "good" we Americans have it regarding prices on some goods gets pretty old too. Everything's relative and it is what it is.
post #18 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2410 View Post
well i for one refuse to buy crappy low quality downloads. if an artists want my money i want it on a CD
x10! Couldn't agree with you more.
post #19 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by estreeter View Post
CDs are about as obsolete as vinyl, a medium which has supposedly been dead for 15 years. I agree that the prices the record companies are asking are obscene, but the answer is that more artists need to embrace hi-rez downloads : if Apple can make the money they do from 256K (formerly 128K ..) AAC, surely there are enough serious music lovers out there to make 320K/FLAC/WAV downloads viable. For many of you in the US and Europe, bandwidth is cheap : its a bit tougher in other parts of the world, but if the downloads are priced competitively I would have to think we would be ahead over time.

As for the difference between 'sharing' and 'stealing', I really hope the OPs hands are never anywhere near my wallet if he cant make that distinction. The artists, and those who actually help them make the music, deserve to be compensated for their efforts : I dont have a single Lily Allen tune in my collection, but I agree with her when she says that there is little point in making music if the consumer no longer attaches a value to the product.
^ This makes total sense.

I was just thinking... I'm surprised that someone such as Steven Wilson of Porcupine Tree, who has clearly demonstrated his distaste for lossy and the digital dl age whereby people only want 1 or 2 songs off of an album and no longer place any importance on listening to albums as a whole, isn't pioneering the flac/320/wav digital dl movement. He continues to offer expensive, special editions which usually includes a 5.1 surround mix, which is all fine, but I agree that high quality digital is the future, as least as an option. If it's possible and their are plenty of people who would gladly pay for better quality, why not just do it? Seems like a no brainer.
post #20 of 191
Quote:
most of the CD's i buy i end up buying from the US and shipping them over as its still cheaper than buying in the UK or even buying VAT free from Jersey
Linky please?! I think I'm getting ripped off too.

Yes - I buy from the States too, but vinyl LPs are very expensive to post (often 60% of the cost of the actual vinyl LP)...
post #21 of 191

Meh. 


Edited by HyperDuel - 12/15/10 at 4:34pm
post #22 of 191
I think for the vast majority of the current(my) generation cds are obsolete. Why pay 15 dollars to buy a cd, when i can get the music for free and can put it straight on my mp3 player.

I for one think that cds are an important part of my listening habbits. But i still download the occasional album as some of the bands i listen to release the "pay your own price" download albums.
post #23 of 191
CD's are nowhere near dead and will last longer than your HDD if cared for properly. The CD is an actual physical record of the music due to the pressing, not like a burnt disc and won't crap out on me if I put a magnet a little too close. I don' think a CD has a rated cycle-life etc like a HDD would. How do you get your music back if your hard drive crashes? Unless you back-up data on a regular basis, which 90% of people don't do, you just lost all of your music. I have all my music waiting to be re-ripped, plus my CD's have resale value.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2410 View Post
well i for one refuse to buy crappy low quality downloads. if an artists want my money i want it on a CD
I have passed on a few albums from smaller bands because they released only through iTunes and the like and had no option to buy a CD. Do I "try-before-I-buy"? Of course, there have been several times that I listened to an album that had great reviews and I thought it was crap. If I am into it I buy the album and support the band, and I have done it for every single album I have done that with this year. People are just whiny about paying money for this stuff, not that they actually think the medium is obsolete.
post #24 of 191
The prices of CDs aren't bad at all, if you know how to buy them. Do what I do, buy them used. I get most of my CDs in "like new" condition for $0.50 - $4.00 on Amazon, plus shipping. Sometimes the case arrives cracked and you can tell it's the fault of USPS, but they get ripped to my computer anyway. I only save the CD for backup.
post #25 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by IPodPJ View Post
The prices of CDs aren't bad at all, if you know how to buy them. Do what I do, buy them used. I get most of my CDs in "like new" condition for $0.50 - $4.00 on Amazon, plus shipping. Sometimes the case arrives cracked and you can tell it's the fault of USPS, but they get ripped to my computer anyway. I only save the CD for backup.
Your not helping anybody though
post #26 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonhapimp View Post
Your not helping anybody though
You mean the RIAA?

A lot of the best music are from artists that are dead.
post #27 of 191
I prefer CD's, I listen to CD's everyday. MP3's are a little sub par to me. I buy CD's at least once a week. New music is always appreciated on my rig. And my rig is not bad with the tubes I have and that are coming.
post #28 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Camper View Post
You mean the RIAA?

A lot of the best music are from artists that are dead.
You can't say two different things, but it's fine that they're dead
the only reason i would buy a CD is to support the artist(no matter how little their cut is) or if i wanted a higher quality source
post #29 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonhapimp View Post
Your not helping anybody though
Tell that to the guy he bought the CDs from.

I don't think CDs are obsolete, yet at least. Recording companies are still making CDs, and they're probably still the main route of delivery, as popular as itunes, etc. are becoming. Correct me if I'm wrong - I'd love to see statistics showing how most people get their music these days (legally).

But until what they're delivering electronically is more consistently lossless, and probably even then, I'll keep getting CDs. I don't see any reason not to. $3 used CD seems like a fair price for most things -- unlike the $12-15+ the robber barons charge for new. I like having the actual physical copy, and maybe I'm in the minority but weirdly enough I actually enjoy ripping CDs.
post #30 of 191
CD's still outsell downloads and it is predicted they will continue to do so for at least a few more years. Even when downloads surpass CD sales, CDs will continue to be sold. If and when by the time they do become obsolete, hopefully lossless downloads will become commonplace.
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