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Alternative to HumX?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hey everybody, I'm looking for some way to resolve a ground loop for my video card and my sound card. When I get my video card cranking I hear a lot of noise, and since I use my computer for gaming almost as much as listening to music, I need a solution to resolve the ground loop besides a cheater cable.

I've been quiet here lately since I've more or less found the sound I was looking for, but now I'm wanting to resolve one of the small little issues I'm seeing.

One thing I've found that based on it's marketing might resolve the issue, is an isobar. Does anybody else know of maybe a power strip I can mount to my desk that would help resolve my ground loop? Right now, I'm using just a chincy little radio shack power strip, and I figure a high end one might get rid of the issues I'm seeing, and possibly give other benefits.

Here is a link to the HumX, what I'm hoping is that the isobar stuff at the second link, might resolve the same issue.

If not, an alternative would be great. Using a cheater cable, I have a perfectly black background, no noise, whatsoever. It's beautiful. Even at the maximum volume I can set the amp at and sound card too. Zero noise floor. I'm wanting to reproduce this without a hacked cable, and without using a wall wart like the humx.

Amazon.com: Ebtech Hum X Voltage Hum Filter: Musical Instruments

Amazon.com: Tripp-Lite HT2210ISOCTR 2-Outlet Home Theater Isobar A/V Power Center (5100 Joules): Electronics
post #2 of 17
They have their Product Features all screwed up. The Product Features or the Hum X are in fact for the Hum Eliminator and vice versa.

Anyway, the Hum X (the one that plugs into the wall) may well work for you. Don't see that the Isobar's going to do anything.

se
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
I'd like to find something besides that, if possible. Any other ideas? I'd love to see a power strip that would offer similar features.
post #4 of 17
There are no power strips currently with built in hum filters. Humx is pretty much your only option. Why are you avoiding the Humx?

Can you give more details on this cheater cable? I think you're talking about a ground lift. A cheater cable is something completely different.

EDIT: In the last thread you posted about this, those who bought the Humx had the crackling eliminated without sacrificing sound quality.
http://www.head-fi.org/forums/f46/gr...s-well-435931/
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aynjell View Post
I'd like to find something besides that, if possible. Any other ideas?
Well, there are only so many ways you can skin that cat.

Eliminate the problem directly by getting around the safety ground with either a "cheater plug" (which are in fact designed and intended to PROVIDE a safety ground, not to defeat it), or something like the HumX which they claim still maintains safety.

Or you can do it indirectly using isolation transformers such as the Hum Eliminator which provide galvanic isolation between components.

Take your pick.

se
post #6 of 17
Hey I made the mistake -- in fact purchased a fancy Isobar. Nice to have a central grounding screw, and it looks great. But it did nothing for the hum. If the hum is caused by a ground loop, then first try plugging everything (and I mean everything) in to a single wall socket. If that fails, then remove the grounding pin (cheater) or Humx.

As Koyaan said, that's it baby.

BTW, Humx works.
post #7 of 17
A ground lift works, but at a risk. Humx is a better option.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fenixdown110 View Post
A ground lift works, but at a risk. Humx is a better option.
What's a ground lift? My cheater cable is just a normal power cable with the ground prong removed. This gave me a perfectly black background but I understand it's not the safest.
post #9 of 17
You just described what you have as a ground lift. An essential removal of the ground prong either physically or through an adapter. A cheater cable is this.

I've only seen RV campers use this when camping.
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
One last question... Since the ground loop appears to be between my PC and amp (my sound card is fine without the amp involved)... wouldn't introducing an optical or spdif based dac between them resolve the issue also?
post #11 of 17
It might and it might not. Both those cables has built in grounds as well, so it might form another ground loop from there.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fenixdown110 View Post
It might and it might not. Both those cables has built in grounds as well, so it might form another ground loop from there.
Ah hell with it then.

I've ordered a mobilespec gli and some belkin cables so I can wire it up, hopefully this'll work. Not sure how decent belkin cables are, but I look forward to at least trying them.



For the whole thing it was about 37$...


I particularly liked the mobilespec because it could be mounted out of sight.
post #13 of 17
Let us know how it goes.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Oh I will. I'm just hoping and praying that I won't have any decreased sound quality.
post #15 of 17
SPDIF is a digital protocol, used in both optical and coax cable connections.

So you are really asking "will an optical SPIDF (TOSLink) connection fix the groundloop?".

Well if you had a grounding problem on a coax digital connection, then yes switching to optical will correct it.

But in your case the analog connection from the DAC to the amp might still have a ground loop. A battery operated DAC will take that possibility out of play. But that's a radical solution -- introduce a DAC to solve a ground loop problem!

You have tried plugging everything in to one wall outlet, yes?
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