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Etiquette 101: How to behave at a classical concert. - Page 3

post #31 of 50
Unfortunately, Classical music is slowly dying off. The only hope of keeping it alive is to encourage the "barbarians" to come and listen and maybe learn.

Unfortunately, that means a lot of distractions for those of us that already have learned.

We've got to hope that enough people will learn to enjoy this type of music the way some of us do.

As for the guy sucking O2, well, he's probably a fan of this type of music and just relax and hope he enjoyed it. I seem to detect a lot of people taking themselves way too damned seriously. Remember Rule 62.
post #32 of 50
Quote:
An unconcious desire to masturbate.

cajunchrist

P.S. My farts DO smell like roses.

they might as well be masterbating. at least they'll be done annoying me quicker.

btw, roses usually don't smell that great, if they smell at all.




Quote:
I seem to detect a lot of people taking themselves way too damned seriously.
what bothers me bothers me. my opinion of myself is irrelevant.
post #33 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by citroeniste


Speaking of the Staatsoper, allow me to brag a bit. Today I saw Tschaik's "Nutcracker" ballet there. And thankfully, a Vienna audience knows how to act during a performance. Oh yeah, my ticket was 30ATS, which is 2.18 euro, which is about US$1.96. Sure, I stood up the whole time, but it was, I repeat UNDER TWO UNITED STATES DOLLARS for an above-average performance of a pretty good ballet in one of the finest performance venues in the world.

I hate you. I paid $14.00 for the privilege.

How come Roger Waters' concert is $15-$200 USD, then?
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally posted by gaineso
Unfortunately, Classical music is slowly dying off. The only hope of keeping it alive is to encourage the "barbarians" to come and listen and maybe learn.

Same as theatre arts, people would rather watch a movie now.
post #35 of 50
Single, yes, if by single you mean "not married".

As for kids, God, I turn 23 tomorrow, so I would certainly hope not!

Quote:
Originally posted by Onix


Single and no kids, rigth?
post #36 of 50
More guidlines:
-If you must headbang, do so from a seated position.
-Do not rush the stage at the beginning of the finale.
-Do not hold up a flaming bic lighter after the performance.
post #37 of 50
to add to pigmode's list:

-if you must drink alcoholic beverages please do so discretely from your opera glasses-flask

-when making the "sign of the devil" towards the performers please do not block the view of those behind you

-if you choose to go shirtless and paint your chest with "wagner rules" or "beethoven rocks" please keep the belly rolling to a minimum
post #38 of 50
As someone who has performed in concert halls, both as part of ensembles (choir, instrumental ensembles) and solo (piano), I can tell you that crowd noise is extremely noticeable to performers, especially to solo performers.

For me, little things like paper rustling and squeaking in chairs are amplified when I'm on stage solo. I don't really pay as much attention when I'm in an ensemble, perhaps because I'm not feeling as much pressure on myself. But when I'm alone on stage, I'm so focused on listening to what I'm playing that it's like my ears become over-sensitive and I pick up every little detail I can manage.

Which means that when my little brother dropped his program once, I was annoyed. When he dropped it again, I was a little unnerved. When he dropped it the third time, I lost my concentration and had a little memory slip-up (rest assured, he didn't hold a program at my next recital ). Makes me understand why Paderewski had his programs printed on silk for concerts that were being broadcast over radio.

I also had the pleasure of having some music appreciation student come to my senior piano recital and forget to turn her cell phone off, and sure enough, about halfway into my Schubert Impromptu (Op. 90 #1 for those familiar...), it goes off. And she doesn't answer right away. No, apparently, this cell-phone was stuck at the bottom of her purse, so she has to go digging through to find it, and finally about 15 seconds later she finally manages to shut the damn thing off.

Now, I've been an audience member when someone's cell phone goes off and it pisses me off like nothing else. Imagine my feelings being the performer! It's actually quite an interesting reaction, it's almost as if I split my thoughts, because there was one part of me that immediately took notice and got extremely annoyed, and yet I was able to keep going with the piece without losing my place. Looking back I think it would've been nice if I'd stopped, turned to her, and just waited until she finally turned it off , but I'm glad and frankly a little amazed that I managed to continue with the piece relatively undeterred (although I had some choice - and loud - words for her when I got backstage - thank God the backstage doors are thick! ). But of course every time I listen to the cd of the performance, that lovely cell phone is in there. Makes you wonder how many live recordings could've turned into legendary masterpieces of interpretation if it weren't for some thoughtless audience member.

If one good thing came of my misfortune, it's that in addition to having the "please turn off all cell phones/pagers/watches" blurb in the programs, my school started having the recording techs come on the intercom before each program and actually remind audience members to make sure that all cell phones and pagers are turned off.
post #39 of 50
The cell phones are annyong enough when it's forgotten but it happens. What is absolutly, completly, and utterly unacceptable...

Ring
Hello?
Hey! I'm at a concert, whats up with you?
Really? Oh my god!!
...
...
...

You should have stopped and encouraged her to answer it. Then ask her who it was, etc, etc... Imagine how cool *that* would be on the CD replay! A comedy *and* music show in one!

And while we're on the subject if pet peeves, if I *EVER* catch someone using a laser pointer at a movie I'll make them wish the laser was never invented! I've actually threatened to kick someone's ass at a movie for that behavior.

And another thing, who the hell takes their young children to see Saving Private Ryan??? The baby cried through the whole opening until I yelled at them to get the kids out of there. At that point the rest of the audience joined with my in yelling at the idiots. Jeez, I'm almost 30 and it was a tough pill for me to swallow, I can only imagine what the 5-year-old thought! He probably burned his GI Joe collection when he got home. But, with parents like that they probably let him play with daddy's 38 when they got home.

And then one time there was this jerk actually *talking* over the cannon blasts during a performance of the 1812 Overture... WTF? I'm trying to listen to the subtleties of the cannon (pun intended) and this jerk is like "blah blah blah...". :-/
post #40 of 50
Quote:
6. Speaking of movements. Thou shalt not clap after a movement ends, only after the whole work does. It's very bothersome for the orchestra conductor to be interrupted by some guys yelling "bravo! bravo!" every 3 minutes.
Well, for most works I would agree... But as a violinist, I certainly wouldn't mind people clapping at the end of the first movement of the Tchaikovsky concerto (as they so often do). It IS the hardest one out of the three, after all.
post #41 of 50
I agree with everything, but, I'd say there are exceptions to #6. Sometimes a particular movement is *so* well played, so emotional and so f#?)($+ing exciting that you can't control yourself and have to clap, yell and throw money at them.
I admit that you should discipline yourself to wait tho.

Same goes for opera.

You should distribute "Classical Music for Dummies" next time.
Not only has great humour and jokes, but it will also teach those newbies how to behave.
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally posted by Nezer

And another thing, who the hell takes their young children to see Saving Private Ryan??? The baby cried through the whole opening until I yelled at them to get the kids out of there. At that point the rest of the audience joined with my in yelling at the idiots. Jeez, I'm almost 30 and it was a tough pill for me to swallow, I can only imagine what the 5-year-old thought

Those parents were truly misguided. Cases like that make psychologists earn a living in years to come and turn kids into persons like... uh... me
post #43 of 50
I'd say install jammers. Why give them the option to forget.
post #44 of 50
Well I see that you guys forgot to mention one of the things that annoys me the most.
That is people falling a sleep during a classical concert, how this is possible I don't know. One time this "person" in front of me was sleeping not only was he moving around but he started to snore that was the last straw. I did something terrible and smacked the guy on the back of the head " hard" fortunately for me he woke up but didn't say anything. It wasn't the most civilized thing to do but I don't regret it.
post #45 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by B&WMan
Well I see that you guys forgot to mention one of the things that annoys me the most.
That is people falling a sleep during a classical concert, how this is possible I don't know. One time this "person" in front of me was sleeping not only was he moving around but he started to snore that was the last straw. I did something terrible and smacked the guy on the back of the head " hard" fortunately for me he woke up but didn't say anything. It wasn't the most civilized thing to do but I don't regret it.
I did mention it! Check my first post.
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