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Wine-fi

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Why is there not a wine-fi thread?

Anyway, I debated separating red and white, but I feel that it would be beneficial to have both discussed in the same thread, as if one person likes white X, recommendations for red Y may come. So, one thread it is.

Discuss favorite wineries, vintages from those wineries, or whatever.

Over thanksgiving my father opened a 2007 V. Sattui Dry Riesling. Previous Rieslings I have tried tend to be sweet for my tastes, but this was phenomenal. It was actually still sweet, but had other parts that counteracted it--maybe more citrus? I do not know, but he still has a case, so I will try again to determine what it was.

-Nkk
post #2 of 16
Franzia 5L box or Carlo Rossi 1 gallon Jug is always the way to go...lol...Just Kidding.
post #3 of 16
Because of the so-called "placebo effects" maybe?
http://www.head-fi.org/forums/f11/pl...s-wine-455892/
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by derek800 View Post
Franzia 5L box or Carlo Rossi 1 gallon Jug is always the way to go...lol...Just Kidding.
My mom's boyfriend drinks only the Franzia. Awful stuff.

Edit: I'll post here since the placebo thread isn't active. I was an original subscriber to Robert Parker's newsletter, back in the 70s when it was the Baltimore/Washington area only and he still worked as a lawyer. Then, he claimed that 10 point spreads were essentially equivalent for most people. I have know idea what his claims are today.
post #5 of 16
I'm not a dedicated oeneophile, but love wine.

Mostly, I prefer wines from the Willamette Valley in Oregon. The majority of those are pinot noirs, but you'll find the occasional cabernet and the gewürstraminers can be excellent, as well.

That stems from going to grad school at Willamette University, right in the middle of it all. I didn't like wine when I moved up there in '94, but there was so much attention given to local wines I decided they were worth trying out. Eventually, I came to love them. Admittedly, I fell hard for Oregon's beer before I developed a taste for the wines.

Since, I've come to love the pinots from Eola Hills, Willamette Valley Vinyards, Duck Pond, Airlie, and Quiotee's Lair. All excellent and reasonably priced. I try to take a week's vacation up there every year and bring back as much wine and beer as I can fit in the car. Sooner or later, I'll move back up there. The drink is superb and so is the locally-grown food.
post #6 of 16
I'm a beer snob who's been trying new wines for a few years. We have some good local vineyards here in Ohio so I've been fortunate to have access to some great tasting stuff.

I also like trying out cheaper wines in the event that I find something special. So far the best bang for the buck I've found is the Red Diamond Merlot at about $11.

I just got a bottle of Port wine a few days ago. Definitely a new experience for me. Much heavier mouthfeel and sweet. Covers up the 19% alcohol pretty well.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
Because of the so-called "placebo effects" maybe?
http://www.head-fi.org/forums/f11/pl...s-wine-455892/
Are you serious, or joking? Because if you are serious, this thread is for experience, not actual ratings. And the placebo effect is everywhere, with beer, food, etc. Price makes thinks look better, and we perceive them as such.

If you were joking, You get a big smile for irony.

-Nkk
post #8 of 16
Any recommendation for red wine £20 max? Hate sour wine that taste like vinegar. What about Chianti or Sauvignon?
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkk View Post
Are you serious, or joking? Because if you are serious, this thread is for experience, not actual ratings. And the placebo effect is everywhere, with beer, food, etc. Price makes thinks look better, and we perceive them as such.

If you were joking, You get a big smile for irony.

-Nkk
I was serious.
For all I know that may be the reason there was no wine-fi thread before this one. Which is one of two questions you asked in the OP...
post #10 of 16
Gabbiano Chianti is the best budget Chianti in my experience, it has a lovely full flavour and goes very well with Pasta and Pizza. Also worth trying is Ruffino.

As for Cabernet, a good super cheap budget Cab is made by Fetzer and Concannon. Fetzer is lighter, while Concannon is much bolder and slightly darker and more robust.

A step higher would be Robert Mondavi's private selection. I'd also highly recommend Domaine Carneros Pinot Noir.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post
Since, I've come to love the pinots from Eola Hills, Willamette Valley Vinyards, Duck Pond, Airlie, and Quiotee's Lair.
I'm a beer snob and will always drink a good beer before I drink wine. However, I, too, really like Pinot Noir. It's my favorite wine. Lately I've been drinking one from Napa, Chalone 2007. It's pretty nice. I will look out for the ones you mention above.

Beaujolais nouveau is a family tradition for Thanksgiving and this year's was pretty good as well.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by iriverdude View Post
Any recommendation for red wine £20 max? Hate sour wine that taste like vinegar. What about Chianti or Sauvignon?
Ocado: Fetzer Barrel Select Zinfandel 2006 (Product Information)
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
I was serious.
For all I know that may be the reason there was no wine-fi thread before this one. Which is one of two questions you asked in the OP...
Fair enough. I was a bit confused by the fact you mentioned placebo in, well, head-fi. Anyway, you could be right, but I tend to thin that whatever makes you like something more is good. If being told a $20 bottle costs $200, fine, that may be good for you. And you can post impressions, and people can judge whether you are impartial or very apt to placebo based on price.

Either way, there was a good article about good low cost wines on Forbes.com a couple of months ago. It was written by the owner of a small vineyard, IIRC. I will dig it up and post a link.

-Nkk
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkk View Post
Why is there not a wine-fi thread?

It was actually still sweet, but had other parts that counteracted it--maybe more citrus? I do not know, but he still has a case, so I will try again to determine what it was.

-Nkk
Acid....the sweet was balanced with acidity. Grapes have a natural acid like other fruits and depending on how warm or cool the growing season was and also how much acid (tartaric acid) the winemaker may have added all come in to play in the final result. Nothing wrong with sweet (in whites) as long as its balanced with acid.
Steve
post #15 of 16
What's the legal age again?
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