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Sound Science as a Career?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hopefully this is the right subsection to ask in, but I was just wondering, to you lurkers of the sound science section that are actually..sound scientists how did you get into the field? Did you just take a BS in Audio Technology/Production in college? And if anyone here builds speakers/drivers/components for a living what courses did you take? Just wondering
post #2 of 29
Also very interested as this is a field I wouldn't mind entering eventually myself.
post #3 of 29
Me too.
For biological hearing sciences (i.e. audiology) in australia, you need to get a degree in linguistics, psychology, speech and hearing science, biomedical science or physical and behavioural sciences and then take the Masters in Audiology (McAud). It'll end up being 5 years in uni for that all up (for most of them). Although I've got 2 degrees already, this sort of thing interests me and I wouldnt mind it too.

Particularly interested in the biological side of things here rather than the circuitry side of things.
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
Yeah, the path to an audiology career seems a lot more clear cut. This ones kinda iffy, as audio technology seems to encompass a lot but I'm not sure if it's relevant in a profession where you're actually creating the components
post #5 of 29
matters what you want to do in the field i suppose. do you want to work on the perception side or the creation side? (or other side)

electrical engineering would be one choice if creation side is what you're after. that's what i'm in and it makes DIYing a lot more fun. i'm not pursuing a career in audio ATM (though that's what got me started in EE), but who knows.
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
I was thinking more along the creation side. Guess a major in EE with a minor in audio (if such a program exists) would be the way to go?
post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nabby View Post
I was thinking more along the creation side. Guess a major in EE with a minor in audio (if such a program exists) would be the way to go?
EE will give you many tools in terms of understanding and designing. I'm just finishing up my final year in EE and many things I've learned have helped me with this hobby. Done things like designing a simple amplifier to power a speaker. Mind you in terms of courses that are actually strictly related to audio, they aren't offered at the University of Alberta .
post #8 of 29
Ape; did you attend the audio meet on campus?
post #9 of 29
I looking at a degree like this, but if that does not come to I'm looking at EE.

For you EEs out there, is Senior Physics a necessity?
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayito-san View Post
Ape; did you attend the audio meet on campus?
I did yes. I had my laptop, D10 and my HF-2's that day. Were you there?
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattcalf View Post
I looking at a degree like this, but if that does not come to I'm looking at EE.

For you EEs out there, is Senior Physics a necessity?
seems like that major is audio engineering. that's like mixing at recording studios and the like. EE would be the creation of audio devices, whereas this is creation of the music itself.

i'm not certain what you mean by senior physics, but i had to take a modern physics class (relativity, electron tunneling, quantum theory, etc . really difficult course, but really really interesting).
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by etiolate View Post
seems like that major is audio engineering. that's like mixing at recording studios and the like. EE would be the creation of audio devices, whereas this is creation of the music itself.
Yep interested in both, more so audio engineering so that's what I'm going for first. Either way I think I'll be very interested and more then likely dabble in both eventually.

Quote:
Originally Posted by etiolate View Post
i'm not certain what you mean by senior physics, but i had to take a modern physics class (relativity, electron tunneling, quantum theory, etc . really difficult course, but really really interesting).
High school senior physics.
post #13 of 29
Quote:
High school senior physics.
high school senior physics like energy, momentum, kinematics, and the like? ya. here (KU), that's phsyics 1, physics 2 is circuits/electromagnetics, physics 3 is modern physics. i had to take physics 1 and 3. (physics 2 was split into 4 EE classes since that's our bread and butter).

i took two years of newtonian (senior) physics in high school and many semesters of it in college. if i wasn't EE i'd be a physics major. i love the stuff.
post #14 of 29
If you haven't taken at least one year of physics in high school you should probably do that. I'm in engineering and I believe it's required to get into the program. I could be wrong, but even if you didn't need to you really should. Without any previous experience the physics series would probably kick your butt (I'm not implying that I think you're stupid, just that it's difficult).
post #15 of 29
My father studied acoustics physics in college, and helped design several industrial loudspeaker models. Of course this was like 20 yrs ago, before he had me, so don't know much about the field now..
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