Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Source Gear › Sony PCM M10 as portable player?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Sony PCM M10 as portable player? - Page 13

post #181 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by zilch0md View Post
 

I already know that there is no Shuffle option on the TASCAM HD-100 MkII.  I've read the entire manual. It's similar to the PCM-M10 - you have to select and play one folder at a time.  Put everything in one folder and you still can't shuffle - you can only scroll through the list.  No search by album, by artist, by song, no play lists.  

 

I'm already accustomed to this with the PCM-M10, so all I'm hoping for is the possibility of a "better" Line Out, but I hear you.

 

What I really want doesn't exist:  A portable device with good battery life that has a card reader with gap-less playback support for FLAC to 96/24, with the simple UI of even a Sanza Clip+, but with a killer DAC to Line Out, no headphone amp, and no other bells or whistles whatsoever.  Keep the parts list down and the quality extremely high.  I just want a card reader to Line Out with a good UI - with which to drive a portable amp of choice.  This market has so many portable amps to choose from, but where are the portable sources that don't have a built-in amp to headphone out?

 

Instead, the closest I can come to my dream device is a selection of buggy DAPs, where early adopters live for the next firmware download.  Relatively speaking, these Japanese field recorders are bullet-proof. They are exceptionally well-documented and thoroughly tested before they are released to the market.  And the pricing reflects the fact that they are sold in much greater numbers than the half-baked DAPs that are slopped onto this tiny headphone enthusiast market.

 

In short, I'm a lot happier putting up with a device that's doing exactly what it was designed to do, even though I'm pressing it to serve a different purpose, than I am putting up with a device that, even in its last firmware revision, continues to fail at doing its intended purpose.

 

Anyone who hasn't spent 30 minutes with a PCM-M10 would be amazed at how well made it is and how well it functions.  It's a gem compared to most of the portable DAPs out there. I can live without sort, search, and shuffle features - if that's what it takes to enjoy a player that's bug-free and robustly built.

 

Mike

 

Yeah, I know what you mean.

I do most of my listening through a Cowon C2 now, it does all I want and although the headphone out is definitely NOT the best, this little player has EXCELLENT battery life, has a bunch of playback options and formats, reads 64gb microSD cards, etc. One of these days the holy grail of DAPs will come out... I'm sure of it...

post #182 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelocks View Post
 

[snip]

 

One of these days the holy grail of DAPs will come out... I'm sure of it...

 

I hope so.   I think it will come from Sony...  :D

post #183 of 229
post #184 of 229

Wow!  That thing is thin!

post #185 of 229

The TASCAM DR-100 MkII arrived today.  And I'm done with it.  I'll be returning it to Amazon, tomorrow.

 

 

1) The TASCAM DR-100 MkII used to be made with a metal case.  Not any more.  Sign of the times, I supposed...  The unit I received has a 100% plastic case, very thin at that.  Cheap!

 

2) The jacks aren't tight on day one.  What will they be like in 3 years?   Answer:  Not like my PMC-M10's jacks.  Cheap!

 

3) The SD card hatch is so flimsy and cheap I'm afraid to handle it.  Cheap!

 

4) Four rubber feet are just simple rubber hemispheres, glued to the flat underside, not recessed into wells.  They are ready to disappear when I least expect it. Cheap!

 

5) The SD cards have to be formatted first by the TASCAM, before you can drag and drop your albums into a "Music" folder that's created by the format function.  The format creates several folders and files and my attempts to just copy them to an SD card formatted on my PC didn't work.  I even changed the volume name to match - no go.  

 

6) The battery hatch will not close all they way - with or without two AA batteries in it. It's like a car door that just won't go completely shut, but it latches well enough to hold the batteries. Cheap!

 

7) The buttons don't lie flush with the front surface - they're canted this way and that.  And when you press them, they don't inspire confidence that they could possibly last.  Cheap!

 

8) The entire thing just feels like a toy - despite how well it photographs. 

 

9) To play 96/24 WAV files having just played 44.1/16 MP3, for example (all on the same media), you have to power it down, then hold the Enter key while powering it up, then select the "HS" mode instead of the default mode.  In other words, the whole thing is dual-boot.  There are operations you can perform having booted with the default mode that you can't use when booting in "HS" mode, but "HS" is the mode that supports 96/24.  This is a royal pain if have a mix of formats on your SD card.

 

10) Not only is the TASCAM not gap-less, the gap is outrageously long - about three full seconds between tracks.  (The Sony PCM-M10 has gap-less playback!)

 

11) Battery life is horrible. I had loaded two freshly charged Sanyo Eneloop AA's because that's what I would want to use regularly, but it sucked them right down in about three hours.   And that's without using a headphone, and with the LCD illumination set to time out within 5 seconds of the last button push.  I get 30 hours on the Sony PCM-M10 - it's famous for that.

 

I'm tired, it's almost 1:00 AM and I have to work in the morning, but I'll be kind and see if I can add some nice things to say about this TASCAM piece of junk...  :-)

 

The sound quality from the Line Out is actually better than that from the PCM-M10 Line Out.  But you really have to find the right tracks and listen very very carefully to notice.   Switching back and forth with the HS2 switchbox (see photo), I was initially convinced that there was no difference in signature, but when I got into some really well recorded 96/24 stuff - Allison Krauss - I could tell the TASCAM was just a wee bit more dynamic, and just a little warmer and fuller sounding, but not any more or less detailed.  

 

The TASCAM was also just a little bit smoother in the highs, but every distinction I'm mentioning here is so very very small and detectable only with some tracks, using an A/B switch.  Together, the sonic advantages are no where near enough incentive for me to keep the poorly constructed TASCAM and watch it disintegrate before my eyes.

 

What's next?    Hmmm....   I think I'll just save up for the Sony PCM-D100...  Patience (and a fist full of dollars) will win the day.

 

:-)

 

Mike


Edited by zilch0md - 9/18/13 at 6:32am
post #186 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by zilch0md View Post
 

The TASCAM DR-100 MkII arrived today.  And I'm done with it.  I'll be returning it to Amazon, tomorrow.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

1) The TASCAM DR-100 MkII used to be made with a metal case.  Not any more.  Sign of the times, I supposed...  The unit I received has a 100% plastic case, very thin at that.  Cheap!

 

2) The jacks aren't tight on day one.  What will they be like in 3 years?   Answer:  Not like my PMC-M10's jacks.  Cheap!

 

3) The SD card hatch is so flimsy and cheap I'm afraid to handle it.  Cheap!

 

4) Four rubber feet are just simple rubber hemispheres, glued to the flat underside, not recessed into wells.  They are ready to disappear when I least expect it. Cheap!

 

5) The SD cards have to be formatted first by the TASCAM, before you can drag and drop your albums into a "Music" folder that's created by the format function.  The format creates several folders and files and my attempts to just copy them to an SD card formatted on my PC didn't work.  I even changed the volume name to match - no go.  

 

6) The battery hatch will not close all they way - with or without two AA batteries in it. It's like a car door that just won't go completely shut, but it latches well enough to hold the batteries. Cheap!

 

7) The buttons don't lie flush with the front surface - they're canted this way and that.  And when you press them, they don't inspire confidence that they could possibly last.  Cheap!

 

8) The entire thing just feels like a toy - despite how well it photographs. 

 

9) To play 96/24 WAV files having just played 44.1/16 MP3, for example (all on the same media), you have to power it down, then hold the Enter key while powering it up, then select the "HS" mode instead of the default mode.  In other words, the whole thing is dual-boot.  There are operations you can perform having booted with the default mode that you can't use when booting in "HS" mode, but "HS" is the mode that supports 96/24.  This is a royal pain if have a mix of formats on your SD card.

 

10) Not only is the TASCAM not gap-less, the gap is outrageously long - about three full seconds between tracks.  (The Sony PCM-M10 has gap-less playback!)

 

11) Battery life is horrible. I had loaded two freshly charged Sanyo Eneloop AA's because that's what I would want to use regularly, but it sucked them right down in about three hours.   And that's without using a headphone, and with the LCD illumination set to time out within 5 seconds of the last button push.  I get 30 hours on the Sony PCM-M10 - it's famous for that.

 

I'm tired, it's almost 1:00 AM and I have to work in the morning, but I'll be kind and see if I can add some nice things to say about this TASCAM piece of junk...  :-)

 

The sound quality from the Line Out is actually better than that from the PCM-M10 Line Out.  But you really have to find the right tracks and listen very very carefully to notice.   Switching back and forth with the HS2 switchbox (see photo), I was initially convinced that there was no difference in signature, but when I got into some really well recorded 96/24 stuff - Allison Krauss - I could tell the TASCAM was just a wee bit more dynamic, and just a little warmer and fuller sounding, but not any more or less detailed.  

 

The TASCAM was also just a little bit smoother in the highs, but every distinction I'm mentioning here is so very very small and detectable only with some tracks, using an A/B switch.  Together, the sonic advantages are no where near enough incentive for me to keep the poorly constructed TASCAM and watch it disentegrate before my eyes.

 

What's next?    Hmmm....   I think I'll just save up for the Sony PCM-D100...  Patience (and a fist full dollars) will win the day.

 

:-)

 

Mike

 

I'm not surprised.  That has been the general consensus on the Tascam gear.  Decent SQ at the price, but the Sony was just better.

post #187 of 229
post #188 of 229

Yup, I think there's already a thread for it! LOL

(people here are fast!)

post #189 of 229

Found it - thanks!

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/680853/sony-nwz-zx1-35th-walkman-anniversary-model

 

And now to figure out if it offers a Line Out...

post #190 of 229

 

 

 

HPRC 2400F case, with Touch shown for scale

 

Links for the TBI Audio Millenia MG3 Amplifier (Class BD, 32Wpc into 8-Ohm on 24VDC power)

 

http://www.positive-feedback.com/Issue62/millenia.htm

http://www.positive-feedback.com/Issue67/tbi_millenia.htm

http://tbisound.com/dsp_products_millenia.asp

 

Mike

post #191 of 229

That battery looked like a great deal for 100 bucks

 

http://www.amazon.com/Venom-3600mAh-22-2-LiPO-Battery/dp/B0027G87MI

 

Now I'm just wondering if their 18.5V flavor were any good for DACmini PX @ +19 V DC (2.4 A) or just get that Energizer XP8000A instead

 

http://centrance.com/blog/2011/11/04/dacmini-px-drives-he-6/

 

http://www.amazon.com/Venom-5000mAh-18-5-LiPO-Battery/dp/B0027GEYS4

 

BTW, I really don't think that rig is all that airport-friendly since it's gotta be tricky to explain that we aren't planning to blow things up, LOL

 

 

post #192 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by zilch0md View Post
 

 

 

 

HPRC 2400F case, with Touch shown for scale

 

Links for the TBI Audio Millenia MG3 Amplifier (Class BD, 32Wpc into 8-Ohm on 24VDC power)

 

http://www.positive-feedback.com/Issue62/millenia.htm

http://www.positive-feedback.com/Issue67/tbi_millenia.htm

http://tbisound.com/dsp_products_millenia.asp

 

Mike

 

WOW...

 

LOL!

post #193 of 229

We're off topic, but it's one of my favorite topics...   :D

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by seeteeyou View Post
 

That battery looked like a great deal for 100 bucks

 

http://www.amazon.com/Venom-3600mAh-22-2-LiPO-Battery/dp/B0027G87MI

 

Now I'm just wondering if their 18.5V flavor were any good for DACmini PX @ +19 V DC (2.4 A) or just get that Energizer XP8000A instead

 

http://centrance.com/blog/2011/11/04/dacmini-px-drives-he-6/

 

http://www.amazon.com/Venom-5000mAh-18-5-LiPO-Battery/dp/B0027GEYS4

 

BTW, I really don't think that rig is all that airport-friendly since it's gotta be tricky to explain that we aren't planning to blow things up, LOL

 

 

Haha, yeah, but I've passed through security with a crazy-looking rig in that same case.  This one does look rather threatening, though.  :p  They will be "swabbing" everything, for sure.

 

The LiPo battery I'm using with the MG3 (in my photo, above), is a 6-cell battery that delivers 25.2V when fully charged - way too much for the CEntrance CX or PX (rated at 19V max.)

 

All LiPo packs are rated for their "nominal" voltage of 3.7V per cell, not their maximum of 4.2V per cell (nor their minimum of 3.0V per cell, below which they can be permanently damaged.)

 

If you are up for the hassles of managing a "dumb" RC LiPo battery, including monitoring its voltage during use to prevent discharging below 3.0V per cell, and leaning to use a "balanced charger" that can charge each cell independently, then I would recommend you use a 3-cell LiPo pack that produces 12.6V per cell when fully charged, or 9.0V when ready for discharge.

 

The DACmini CX and PX "remanufacture" any voltage coming in that falls between 9V and 19V, with sound quality remaining constant no matter what the input voltage.  A 3-cell LiPo pack would be ideal because they are a lot lighter, smaller and less expensive for the same mAh rating as a pack that has more cells (more voltage).

 

There's something else to consider, however.  The DACmini CX and PX use a PSU that delivers less than 3A, but these batteries can deliver a LOT more current.  In addition to their mAh and nominal voltage ratings, they are all have a "C" rating, which when multiplied by the mAh rating, will tell you how many mA of current they can deliver continuously without overheating. The 3600mAh battery I'm using with the MG3 has a rating of "25C," which means it can deliver a whopping 90,000 mA continuously, but the MG3's designer, Jan Plummer, assured my that I could use a 90 Amp power supply because the MG3 has a 4A fast-blow fuse that will pop if something shorts. He added, however, that he will not repair any damage caused by using experimental power sources.  :o  

 

So...  I would check with CEntrance before using something like this 3-cell 5000 mAh LiPo pack, that can supply 100 Amps continuously (and would operate in the range 9.0V to 12.6V):

 

http://www.amazon.com/Turnigy-5000mAh-Lipo-Battery-Pack/dp/B005YRHMNC

 

See?  It's lighter, smaller, less expensive, but it has a higher mAh rating than my 6-cell battery.

 

Here's the charger I use:  

 

http://www.amazon.com/Thunder-Balance-Charger-Discharger-Software/dp/9269806723

 

You can find better prices than this elsewhere (I got mine here:  http://www.hobbypartz.com/thac6smbachw.html)

 

Here's the voltage monitor/audible alarm I use with my LiPo packs:  http://www.amazon.com/Integy-C23212-Voltage-Checker-Warning/dp/B003Y6E6IE

 

I've programmed it to alarm when any cell in the pack gets down to 3.4V, because this is the point at which the discharge curve begins to take a voltage dive - having consumed about 91% of total capacity, sound quality would become reduced at this point (more theoretical than observable - less overhead, dynamics, bass extension, etc.)

 

 

Hobbypartz also has a 5500 mAh 3-cell LiPo that you might prefer: http://www.hobbypartz.com/98p-25c-5500-3s1p.html

 

But ask CEntrance first about its 137.5 Amp continuous current capability!

 

-------------

 

All that said, here is much longer lasting, less expensive (charger included), and much less thinking- and labor-intensive alternative for powering the CEntrance CX or PX on the go:

 

http://www.amazon.com/20000mAh-Ultra-High-Multi-Voltage-Notebooks-Compatible/dp/B00B45EOYS

 

Best of all, this thing will not deliver more than 3A current at 19V.   Perfect for the CX or PX!

 

 

I chose to use the 6-cell LiPo pack, instead, because sound quality varies with input voltage for the TBI Millenia MG3 amp, but that's not the case with a CEntrance CX or PX.  As the voltage from the Anker Astro Pro2's 19V port falls during discharge, you will hear no difference in sound quality with the DACmini CX or PX (thanks to how CEntrance remanufactures the input power).   And this battery will automatically shut itself off when the cells reach 3.0V.  

 

:D

 

Mike


Edited by zilch0md - 9/29/13 at 11:51am
post #194 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelocks View Post
 

WOW...

 

LOL!

 

Haha!

 

I know...  On the Pictures of Your Portable Rig (part XVI) thread, somebody posted, "Epic portability" - which could be taken as sarcasm or as praise.  I can see it both ways!  :D

 

Mike

post #195 of 229

Size comparisons of the forthcoming PCM-D100 vs. PCM-M10, PCM-D50, and PCM-D1

 

 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Portable Source Gear
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Source Gear › Sony PCM M10 as portable player?