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Some Impressions of Ayre QB-9 - Page 3

post #31 of 37
Thread Starter 
Any development in comparison between QB9 and Ref1? Finger crossed.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by tosehee View Post
I will be auditioning this in local store that stocks this. I will be bring my Ref1 along with HD800 and do some serious AB-x testing. I will be going with googlephone once his time loosens up a little.

I don't think I will hear much improvements from my setup, but I am all for surprises.
post #32 of 37

Why I Bought the QB-9

Bought it today (from Sunny's in Covina, CA) after a 40-minute listening session. Ran it with an amp and headphones I know extremely well - the amp section of my RSA Predator and Senn HD800s.

You can definitely hear the advantages of asynchronous USB. What I expected to hear as a result of the near-elimination of jitter was clarity, crispness, and tightness - and I got them, in spades.

Example: If you're familiar with "Butch and Butch," from Oliver Nelson's "Blues and the Abstract Truth," you know that little high-hat cymbal strike about five seconds in. It's a very distinctive sound, as Haynes strikes the high-hat and pedals it closed at the same time. The Ayre rendered it PERFECTLY.

Another example: Edgar Meyer's bass solo on "From Ankara to Izmir," from the "Skip Hop and Wobble" LP he did with Jerry Douglas and Russ Barenberg. He covers virtually the entire range of the bass in about a minute - at least three octaves, all the way down to the open fourth string, which is 41 Hz. Tightly controlled, woody, resonant - exactly what you would hear live.

Resolution of inner detail? Oh, yes. I thought my Benchmark was good at that, but the Ayre unraveled the three acoustic guitars at the beginning of Cara Dillon's "Hill of Thieves" much better.

Ambience and air? Captured beautifully. I listened to Jean-Efflam Bavouzet's recording of Debussy's "Clair de Lune," and the only adjective that describes it is "right." It sounded like a piano, not a recording of a piano.

And it can blast, too. Whether it's rock or big orchestras, it's up to the task. The hi-res (88.2/24) file of the San Francisco Symphony's recording of Mahler's First was just stunning.

I could go on, but I think you get the idea.

Now I need a new headphone amp. Any QB-9 owners have any suggestions?
post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by yanfeng View Post
Any development in comparison between QB9 and Ref1? Finger crossed.....
sorry for not updating this.

Yes. I have done the audition myself in the local store for 2 hours using the Ref1 as the dac to compare.

There are pros and cons, but ultimatley, I decided to sell Ref1 and go for cheaper dac for now. I am eyeing this dac for a future purchase.

:-)
post #34 of 37

Any other impressions from owners?

post #35 of 37

Great review thanks.  I am a bit behind as I just got a Benchmark DAC1.  I will have step up soon.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by burnspbesq View Post

Bought it today (from Sunny's in Covina, CA) after a 40-minute listening session. Ran it with an amp and headphones I know extremely well - the amp section of my RSA Predator and Senn HD800s.

You can definitely hear the advantages of asynchronous USB. What I expected to hear as a result of the near-elimination of jitter was clarity, crispness, and tightness - and I got them, in spades.

Example: If you're familiar with "Butch and Butch," from Oliver Nelson's "Blues and the Abstract Truth," you know that little high-hat cymbal strike about five seconds in. It's a very distinctive sound, as Haynes strikes the high-hat and pedals it closed at the same time. The Ayre rendered it PERFECTLY.

Another example: Edgar Meyer's bass solo on "From Ankara to Izmir," from the "Skip Hop and Wobble" LP he did with Jerry Douglas and Russ Barenberg. He covers virtually the entire range of the bass in about a minute - at least three octaves, all the way down to the open fourth string, which is 41 Hz. Tightly controlled, woody, resonant - exactly what you would hear live.

Resolution of inner detail? Oh, yes. I thought my Benchmark was good at that, but the Ayre unraveled the three acoustic guitars at the beginning of Cara Dillon's "Hill of Thieves" much better.

Ambience and air? Captured beautifully. I listened to Jean-Efflam Bavouzet's recording of Debussy's "Clair de Lune," and the only adjective that describes it is "right." It sounded like a piano, not a recording of a piano.

And it can blast, too. Whether it's rock or big orchestras, it's up to the task. The hi-res (88.2/24) file of the San Francisco Symphony's recording of Mahler's First was just stunning.

I could go on, but I think you get the idea.

Now I need a new headphone amp. Any QB-9 owners have any suggestions?
post #36 of 37

Hey guys im intresting in buying my first head fi setup within the next couple months and im wondering about this dac is it exciting and a good match for hardrock/heavy metal i.e melodic death metal? Iv read lots on this dac but nothing about it being exciting or rather anything but relaxing which is fine to me if it can do exciting as well Im thinking of getting a pair of beyerdynamic t1's with an a1 amplifier to go along with it as that seems to have what im going for but not so sure about the dac although it is in the price range of about what im willing to pay and its an async usb dac which is kinda what im going for.

post #37 of 37

Quiet thread  :smile:  but actually there have been further improvements to this USB DAC, now called the Ayre Acoustics QB-9 DSD DAC.

 

http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/565-ayre-acoustics-qb-9-dsd-dac-review/ 

 

After I get my GS-X mk2, this tops the list to feed it (once funds allow).


Edited by cooperpwc - 4/14/14 at 4:14am
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