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Beyerdynamic DT880 more than hold their own against the Grado PS1000 - Page 2

post #16 of 59
Excellent first post indeed, and welcome to Head-Fi!
The PS1000 does not seem to be all that regarded around here, so no surprise you prefer the DT880 over it. Really interesting to see how the T1 will compare against the DT880.
post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by julienchina View Post
Thanks Eric for your kind words. I will definitely check on the DT48. But I see there is a 25 Ohm version and a 200 Ohm version. Which version do you have ?
. . . and a 5 Ohm version as well.
post #18 of 59

Great first post

Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
Excellent first post indeed, and welcome to Head-Fi!
The PS1000 does not seem to be all that regarded around here, so no surprise you prefer the DT880 over it. Really interesting to see how the T1 will compare against the DT880.
I agree, this has to be the best first post I've every come across. While I do not agree with your comments on the DT880s as I found them very thin/metallic (highs) with boomy uncontrolled bass, but heck...we all hear differently and prefer different things. I do agree that the 600 ohms were better than the 250, but to me, just barely.

I do agree with the thoughts on the PS1000, it sounds like a slightly more refined GS1000 (for a whole lot more $$$) and really doesn't retain that quick and exiting Grado sound. IMO...the best one in the Grado line up is still the RS1, then followed by the SR225.

Welcome to Head-fi and my condolences to your personal finances.
post #19 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by catachresis View Post
. . . and a 5 Ohm version as well.
But those are hardcore..
post #20 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by julienchina View Post
This is my first post on head-fi...
Ballsy first post.. 'accuracy' isn't fun to many people here.. But the truth hurts I guess.. You should really try the HP2/K1000/DT48/K240DF/DT880 s
post #21 of 59
Fantastic first post. I'd be very interested to read your impressions on other headphones as well.
post #22 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by julienchina View Post
Thanks Erik for your kind words. I will definitely check on the DT48. But I see there is a 25 Ohm version and a 200 Ohm version. Which version do you have ?

get both, it's head-fi here
post #23 of 59
Thanks for your posts. I have the DT880's and like them a lot. I have listened to the 600 ohms and the difference is not huge.
the DT880's are great phones for classical and acoustic music, although I like Stax better for those genres.
post #24 of 59
I think that is a very thoughtful and balanced first post. A lot better than mine for sure. Well i hope to read more of your point of view in the future. Maybe i will have to be the DT 880 on a to get list.
post #25 of 59
Thanks for the info. Let us know if you can compare the 250 ohm and 600 ohm versions. BTW, your profile says you are a TV show host. What show?
post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by fhuang View Post
get both, it's head-fi here
boom...crash.
post #27 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvrboy View Post
BTW, your profile says you are a TV show host. What show?
I do many shows all over the country, but everything regular I have is in Chinese. If you really want to watch I hosted the Marat Safin retirement ceremony at the China Open. It's on Youtube I think.
post #28 of 59
Thanks for posting your comments. I will be interested to see how you rate the HD800.
post #29 of 59
Just wondering: OP has said that the DT880, while timbrally accurate, are not as resolving as the PS1000. Does this relative lack of resolution in the DT880 result in a recording sounding less 'real' in terms of the sense of space and room? What I've found with the low bias Lambdas is that the reverb tails and spatial cues are so well resolved that you get a real sense of 'being there' on the best recordings. Even with rock music you can tell what the guitar cab booth or the drum room sounds like. Would the 880 be less capable of giving this sense?
post #30 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by julienchina View Post
This is my first post on head-fi.
I used to be a professional cellist, and used to play alongside all kinds of instruments in all kinds of rooms or halls. And I love hi-fi, and have toyed with many very impressive systems, going up to the hundreds of thousands (US$).
I'm saying that because the typical musician doesn't know equipment. Musicians are easily impressed, because they don't even imagine getting close to the live experience with any equipment is a possible thing.
They are certainly not after it, because they live in live environments, so what they look for and notice the most in hi-fi is what is better than the live experience. Tell me I'm wrong.
In a nutshell, don't trust your musician friends on equipment. But maybe you can trust me a little... lol.
First of all, I want you all to know that by principle I am always trying not to be brand biassed.
Because most brands have different products that satistfy different customers. And if we speak of headphones they depend so much on the rest of the chain to sound good that many times comparing two pairs of cans on the same amp is not fair to at least one of them.

But !

That being said, I have to confess that recently I am in awe with my 600 Ohm DT880. For acoustically recorded music (as opposed to music we usually listen to with amplification, such as jazz, pop-rock etc) , I think the 600 ohm DT880s ( I don't like the lower impedance versions) are the most timbre accurate (I choose my words very carefully, I didn't say most revealing) headphones I have ever heard.
They take time to get to their best, but it's the first time I hear this kind of instrument timbre accuracy on a pair of headphones. I have far less experience in the headphone domain than the speaker domain, so I have never heard the K1000, the Qualia, the Omega, the Orpheus, or the R10.
Nor the newest HD800 and T1.
But I've listened to my best recorded CDs and SACDs with many of the expensive Denon, Audio Technica, Mb Quart/Maestro, and of course Grado.
I never thought I'd feel like this, because so-called "accuracy" is always room acoutics dependant, so we always can argue that different devices' sound signatures are like different rooms.
But, that is the only pair of heaphones I've heard that gets the right timbre for every instrument and voice, even in big symphonic recordings. I don't love my HD650s that much anymore (still on certain types of recordings or music), because coming from the Beyers I hear distortion in the highs.
I just cancelled my order for the Grado PS1000 after a very careful listening session comparing them with the DT880s. Both had two weeks of 24/7 run-in time, and I compared them on different amps including the flagship Rudistor combo and the Lavry DA11.
Without a doubt, considerably more information, and more "air" is coming out of the PS1000, so in terms of resolution objectively the Grados are the better can by a mile. But at the end, as impressive as they can be, with classical music the Grados are not timbre accurate in the highs the way the Beyers are, there is a coloration that is quite far away from what the instruments sound in any acoutic conditions in real life. Compared to the DT880s. Then compare to the coloration on Audio Technicas and the Grados are Heaven on Earth, but that's another story...

Also, the PS1000s boost the bass slightly in a way that makes me feel that in many symphonic recordings the double bass low notes come even faster and clearer than the violins ! This is not normal, in real life it takes 10 times the time to even start the vibrations on a thick string !

Of course, the DT880s have their flaws too. They aren't that great for me in pop music or rock, they will often sound dull and dry and are the least forgiving I know on bad recordings or lossy files (in that category the oh so revealing PS1000s nevertheless sound better on pop/rock mp3s, and of course the low impedance allows them to play directly on mp3 players.
With them I was proven once again how better sounding my Samsung YP-P3 is than my so highly praised Cowon S9...)

The bottom line is : for good classical music recordings, the 600 Ohm DT880s are so timbre accurate that they outclass their price range by quite a margin.
So, for the next step I will have to choose between either the HD800 or the T1. If I like them.
I paragraphed this as a wall of text isn't pleasant on the eye.

Anyway, welcome to the Beyerdynamic DT880 600 ohm club!!
For in-ears, I'll try the JVC / Victor HP-FX500 for timbre as well as those are fantastic for timbre (birch wood drivers and casing!). Timbre is a very underrated thing and a lot of people neglect this aspect = a shame as tbh, it's a fundamental thing in music.
I find this song top be good to test out violins and bass together (has a simple bassline underlying the violins):

+ YouTube Video


the DT880 / 600 = beyond underrated for the price tbh. I rather have accuracy over anything else and if that means it's 'dull sounding' so be it and I'm glad you like your DT880 / 600 for accuracy
Please post your impressions here!:

http://www.head-fi.org/forums/f4/bey...thread-429371/
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