Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Just listened to some Fostex T50RPs today... WOW!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Just listened to some Fostex T50RPs today... WOW! - Page 135

post #2011 of 10570

 

  • This from Fostex website:  http://www <dot> fostexinternational.com/docs/products/RP-Series.shtml#1
  • Overview

 

The new Fostex T20RPmkII and T40RPmkII now join the acclaimed T50RP in offering the true and accurate headphone monitoring crucial for recording studios, post houses, remote broadcast facilities, project studios and DJ’. Here is a range of headphones which have been designed from the outset to offer the widest frequency range, to minimise listening fatigue and to allow you to accurately pinpoint and analyse all aspects of your creative output.
Headphones which faithfully reproduce all aspects of the program material, free from any sonic coloration and distortion.
And headphones which combine supreme clarity and audio performance in a comfortable, sophisticated design.

CLEAR, TRANSPARENT SOUND
All RP Series headphones deliver this uncolored reproduction and natural clear sound right across the full frequency range with full bass and sparkling highs. But it’s the sonic quality at high sound pressure levels which really sets these headphones apart. Whereas lesser headphones struggle at high sound pressure levels, the RP Series have no such problems. The bass is always powerful and distortion-free even at high levels. - Essential when headphone monitoring in noisy environments such as ENG recording, DJ work, and in applications where you need to concentrate totally on your the program material.
The Design of the leatherette padded ear cushions enhance the excellent sound isolation and superb deep bass reproduction

UNIQUE FOSTEX RP TECHNOLOGY
Key to the transparent sound reproduction is Fostex’s Regulated Phase Technology, a proprietory transducer and diaphragm design that has earned Fostex more than twenty international patents and has been successfully applied to microphones, headphones and loudspeakers used and relied upon in professional and commercial sound installations worldwide.
This technology has been enhanced still further in a new RP Diaphragm
(now standard across the range), which uses copper foil etched polyimide film to provide excellent resistance to high level input peaks of up to 3000mW (T50RP), ensuring an accurate sound regardless of the volume.

COMFORT AND DURABILITY
Manufactured to the most exacting standards with durable, tough and rugged materials and components, RP Series headphones are not only built to last. They’re also built for comfort. Those padded ear cushions and wide, self adjusting headbands ensure maximum comfort and fit during extended wearing periods. Fostex’s eye for design and real-world usability can also be seen in the lockable, single entry jack which minimizes cord tangles and offers excellent serviceability.

THE LAST WORD
Whether you’re monitoring analog or digital audio sources, work in a professional or project studio, mixing live, or need a great pair of ’cans for DJ work, you require headphones which offer solid bass, clear mids and sparkling highs. And faithfully reproduce all aspects of the program material, free from any sonic coloration and distortion. A pair of Fostex RP Series headphones will deliver all this.
And then some.

 

  • Patented RP Technology
  • Newly developed RP Diaphragm with copper foil etched polyimide film and neodynium magnet construction for accurate and natural acoustic sound reproduction
  • Single entry locking 3 metre ‘copper construction’ cord
  • Padded ear cushions for maximum sound isolation and deep bass reproduction
  • Wide, self-adjusting headband for superb comfort and extended wearing periods
  • Compatible with all analog and digital formats

 

 

 

 

 

T20RPmkII

Type : Semi-open RP dynamic
Frequency Response : 20 Hz - 30 kHz
Sensitivity : 97 dB/mW
Max Input : 2000 mW
Impedance : 50 ohm
Weight : 330g (excluding cable)

T40RPmkII
Type : Enclosed RP dynamic
Frequency Response : 15 Hz - 30 kHz
Sensitivity : 96 dB/mW
Max Input : 2000 mW
Impedance : 50 ohm
Weight : 330g (excluding cable)

T50RP
Type : Semi-open RP dynamic
Frequency Response : 15 Hz - 35 kHz
Sensitivity : 98 dB/mW
Max Input : 3000 mW
Impedance : 50 ohm 

 

 

Weight : 330g (excluding cable)

 

Edit:  The weight of the T50RP did not paste during first attempt.

 

  • T20RPmkII
  • Frequency Response: 20Hz - 30kHz
  • Max Input 2000 mW
  • Impedance 50 ohm
  • Semi-open type construction offers rich low frequency sound whilst maintaining all the nuances of vocal performance
  • Excellent transient characteristics
  • Ideal for professional use in commercial recording studios

 

  • T40RPmkII
  • Frequency Response: 15Hz - 30kHz
  • Max Input 2000 mW
  • Impedance 50 ohm
  • Enclosed type for excellent sound reproduction. Also prevents feedback into the mic at recording sessions
  • Ideal for professional use in noisy environments, the first choice for DJ work and broadcast sound engineers

 

  • T50RP
  • Frequency Response: 15Hz - 35kHz
  • Max Input 3000 mW
  • Impedance 50 ohm
  • Damped semi-open type for extended low-frequency and clear mid / high frequency reproduction
  • Superb quality and perfect for commercial recording use and critical listening applications

Edited by bluemonkeyflyer - 8/8/11 at 11:39am
post #2012 of 10570

Does anyone have pictures of the T50RP stock cable terminations/solder connections?  I also wonder about the wire type and geometry?

post #2013 of 10570
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemonkeyflyer View Post

Does anyone have pictures of the T50RP stock cable terminations/solder connections?  I also wonder about the wire type and geometry?


The storck wire is some type of "OFC".  The detachable cable is 3-conductor with a 3.5mm plug on one end and a 6.3mm plug on the other.  The wires are 32awg or something, ultra tiny.  The internal wiring is thicker, also copper.  It takes a lot of heat to tin.  =\

The jack inside the left cup into which you plug the long cable into is a Neutrik PCB jack with threading, secured by a nut.

 

post #2014 of 10570

Can you use ordinary soldering wire from the hardware store for soldering the cable? Is 60w soldering Iron enough/to much?

 

I can get Beyer (DT250) Velour pads instead of the 840 pads, any opinions?


Edited by HDMan - 8/8/11 at 3:11pm
post #2015 of 10570

Mad Max,

 

Thanks for the information.  By 3-conductor, I assume you mean a TRS plug at both ends.  So would that mean 4 wires with 1 Left channel positive, 1 Right channel positive and 2 negatives sharing a common ground soldered to the sleeve of each TRS plug?  If so, I wonder if the cable wires are twisted pairs or have some other geometric configuration; and if they are shielded?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Max View Post



The storck wire is some type of "OFC".  The detachable cable is 3-conductor with a 3.5mm plug on one end and a 6.3mm plug on the other.  The wires are 32awg or something, ultra tiny.  The internal wiring is thicker, also copper.  It takes a lot of heat to tin.  =\

The jack inside the left cup into which you plug the long cable into is a Neutrik PCB jack with threading, secured by a nut.

 



 

post #2016 of 10570

make sure you use rosin-core solder which is intended for electrical/electronics work and not acid-core for plumber's.

60w is more than sufficient - even 40w will do; just make sure that it is compact and slender enough for even fine pcb work (for your future diy stuff).

 

i've got both pads but haven't tested them yet ... between the two, i think there is some preference here for the 840 pads, but ymmv.  some consider the stock pads to be better than either...
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HDMan View Post

Can you use ordinary soldering wire from the hardware store for soldering the cable? Is 60w soldering Iron enough/to much?

 

I can get Beyer (DT250) Velour pads instead of the 840 pads, any opinions?



 


Edited by geetarman49 - 8/8/11 at 4:10pm
post #2017 of 10570

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemonkeyflyer View Post

Mad Max,

 

Thanks for the information.  By 3-conductor, I assume you mean a TRS plug at both ends.  So would that mean 4 wires with 1 Left channel positive, 1 Right channel positive and 2 negatives sharing a common ground soldered to the sleeve of each TRS plug?  If so, I wonder if the cable wires are twisted pairs or have some other geometric configuration; and if they are shielded?


I'm sorry, I meant that there are only three wires in the detachable cable (only one ground).

No shielding.  It is typical cheap wire: each wire is made of multiple, enamel-coated strands with a cotton fiber core to reduce microphonics.  To tin it, you have to use a blue flame to carefully burn-off the enamel-coating so you can work with it.  I did not know the blue flame part when I tried to remove the Neutrik jack and the locking mini TRS and solder directly to the internal wiring, so I just recabled the whole thing with Mogami 2534.

post #2018 of 10570
Quote:
Originally Posted by KneelJung View Post

 

I got through another 20 pages of the thread  last night. There was a lot of really good info and thought provoking stuff between page 90 and 110. Hopefully I can work my way through the rest of it in the next couple of days. I'm sort of reluctant to remove that felt on the inside driver back though. I liked your Rastapants plasticine config btw. I'm assuming your other suggestion on the earside of the baffle is this:

 

rasta.jpg

 

So if I understand how you have yours most of the driver is exposed on the earside of the baffle?

 

So when your listening there is nothing between your ear and the driver?

 

So did you cut out that entire square and box the driver squares with paxmate too; or did you just cut our individual squares leaving the original felt?


I cut out the felt over the driver, leaving the fine screen intact for debris protection.  The 840 and O2 pads both have nice quality cloth to cover the driver, and it has no particular impact on the sound.  The Sony pads, above, have no fabric. 

 

The PaxMate was simply cut into strips to surround the driver, which got rid of reflections between the baffle and the ear and cleaned things up in the mids.  

 

post #2019 of 10570
Quote:
Originally Posted by geetarman49 View Post

make sure you use rosin-core solder which is intended for electrical/electronics work and not acid-core for plumber's.

60w is more than sufficient - even 40w will do; just make sure that it is compact and slender enough for even fine pcb work (for your future diy stuff).

 

i've got both pads but haven't tested them yet ... between the two, i think there is some preference here for the 840 pads, but ymmv.  some consider the stock pads to be better than either...
 



 



Thanks for the soldering tips.

 

On a side note:  Although the drivers appear to be the same on the 3 models, I think there must be some upgrade to the T50RP driver because it can handle a whopping (max) 3000 mW, where as the lower models only accept (max) 2000 mW input.

post #2020 of 10570

I would also say it's worth a bit of extra coin to get a temp-controlled soldering iron, especially when you're working around the T50 PCB.  We don't need any more stories about ruined leads.

 

I would not recommend velour pads for these, as getting a really good seal is crucial to good sound.  Those pads would probably sacrifice too much bass.

post #2021 of 10570

Can I use the original cable with my woodies, just cut the cable at the end and solder it onto the driver?

 

I only have a cheap 60w iron $13 lol. See how we go.

post #2022 of 10570

I have a Weller WES51 analog temp controlled solder station.  I'm just learning how to solder.  What type of solder/brand and what temp setting would you recommend?

 

Also, for de-soldering the stock terminations from the PCB, what temp would be best?  I assume a solder sucker would be better than de-solder wicks for such delicate surgery?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpearce View Post

I would also say it's worth a bit of extra coin to get a temp-controlled soldering iron, especially when you're working around the T50 PCB.  We don't need any more stories about ruined leads.

 

I would not recommend velour pads for these, as getting a really good seal is crucial to good sound.  Those pads would probably sacrifice too much bass.



 

post #2023 of 10570

The opposite might actually be true, but they aren't THAT sensitive.  Mine has temp controls but doesn't state what temperature it's at, so I'm not sure I can help you there.  As far as solder goes, as long as it's rosin core, is relatively narrow, and actually name branded, you should be fine.  I've had some cheap stuff that is really hard to control, but I got a roll of .6mm 60/40, and it's so nice to work with.  While a lot of the fancy DIY guys use silver solder, the lead stuff is really easy to work with.

post #2024 of 10570
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDMan View Post

Can I use the original cable with my woodies, just cut the cable at the end and solder it onto the driver?

 

I only have a cheap 60w iron $13 lol. See how we go.



No, you can't.  The problem is that the current cable is single-entry, and you're not going to be able to run the woodies for one entry.  You will need to get some cable that you can make into a y-cable.

 

One easy option is to cannibalize a pair of cheap dual-entry cables, but the cable isn't going to be great quality.  I've used a pair of Sony Piiq for that purpose.  You can desolder the leads from the drivers, then solder the cables onto the new driver leads.

 

It's probably worth getting some decent microphone cable, though, which isn't that expensive.  It's nice to work with, easy to solder, and sounds good.  A lot of people use star quad, which you can strip down and carry the individual wires up to the earcups, but I personally use the thinner microphone cable, which I find a nice compromise and significantly lighter to work with.  There are some good threads on cable making in the DIY board.  I would offer to make you one, but mine always end up way more functional than fashionable.

post #2025 of 10570

How about this microphone cable?

 

http://www.swamp.net.au/premium-mono-xlr-male-mic-cable-5m.html

 

Do i just cut the XLR connection off and split the wires?

 


Edited by HDMan - 8/8/11 at 6:26pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Just listened to some Fostex T50RPs today... WOW!