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Just listened to some Fostex T50RPs today... WOW! - Page 753

post #11281 of 11293
Quote:
Originally Posted by HotIce View Post
 

 

I was curious about those, so I got the T40RP MK3 (the closed version) to give them a try.

I am using the FIIO E12 to power them, and I never have to turn the volume knob further than 1100.

The Schiit Modi+Magni will be plentiful.

Thanks for getting back to me so soon, glad to hear my amp should be sufficient! I was just wondering about it since I had heard from other reviews online that they were insanely hard to drive and that they were very picky when it came to which amps would work, I was worried that this investment would easily become double the price because of having to find an amp that could sufficiently drive them.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bluemonkeyflyer View Post


Take a look at garage1217 amps. Great sound at any price and great price:performance. I have Project Sunrise II and Project Ember. Both are terrific. Ember is my preference.

Thanks, I'll check those out =)

post #11282 of 11293

I run those headphones with a Schiit Valhalla 2, a Teac UD-301, and an OPPO HA-2 and am pleased with the sound. I have heard other headphones of similar make on a Pono player and that can do a good job as well but I have yet to lay my hands on one but hope to soon.

post #11283 of 11293

After having BMF's V3 mods for a year, I got the itch and decided to dive into mine again; get rid of the jack and do a dual entry cable, fix the stripped cup threads and a few other changes I've been wanting to do.  While doing this I noticed how easy it is to lift up the driver from the baffle near the cable terminals and I think I realized the purpose of the four pillars and shock absorbers in the cups, which seem to be to provide pressure on the driver to prevent it from lifting. 

 

But now I'm thinking you could glue the driver housing to the baffle and remove the pillars in the cups.  The baffle and cup are pretty sturdy and rigid and don't twist or flex much on their own so I don't think they provide any significant structural support and I can't imagine any adverse effects. 

 

I did notice there was a felt seal between the driver housing and baffle in Tyll's pictures so maybe their intention was to provide some mechanical separation between the driver and the cup and baffle with this design.

 

I'm tempted to do this as it would provide a consistent seal between the driver and baffle, make working with materials for internal dampening easier, and maybe slightly increase the cup volume?  But maybe it's not worth the trouble.

 

Any thoughts on this?  I searched around and haven't seen it mentioned much. 

 

Here are my cups so far, by the way: 

 

Jack and cable entries sealed with plastic epoxy, thin plastic super glued over the cup vents, super glue over hanger mount seams, and all of those small standing posts removed.

 

I have an HD600 cable that I'm going to solder to the stock internal wires of the driver and I ordered a few different foams from Foam Factory to play around with and some 1" thick polyester fiber fill that's quite loose and easily separates into nice and even thin layers if needed.  I did remove the thick paper treble reflector but I'm going to stick with stiff craft felt over the rear of the driver and 840 pads.  I was pretty happy with BMF's mods so I don't plan on deviating too much from them for now.


Edited by keif - 7/18/16 at 11:12am
post #11284 of 11293

I would be interested to see the photo of the dual entry cable connectors when you get that done. I am planning to do that mod to some Fostex I have.

 

 

If ever any of you take off too much material and want to add something back, even a screw mount I know of a product that is pretty amazing, lightweight and stronger than the original plastic.

post #11285 of 11293

Will do.

 

I'd be interested in that.  I used Permatex Plastic Weld and while it seems strong enough it was very difficult to work with.  It dries very quick and gets sticky and stringy making it hard to manipulate.  I'll take some pictures of the outside of the cup and the filled jack entry.

 

I did use this guide which was helpful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KwD0vS_RSE

post #11286 of 11293

The product I use requires good ventilation but once it sets you can grind it, sand it, and paint it if you wish. Under heat and pressure you can do some amazing things with it but it is not necessary just to mend plastic. It is only available from dental supply houses but if you are on good terms with a dentist he might order some of it for you. I have heard it called dental acrylic or tray acrylic or methyl-methacrylate. As an insulator I believe it will withstand 100,000 volts. With it you could make a mold and create your own headphone cups, but you would have to practice with it some first. Read the precautions and be safe if you do try to use it.

post #11287 of 11293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paladin79 View Post
 

The product I use requires good ventilation but once it sets you can grind it, sand it, and paint it if you wish. Under heat and pressure you can do some amazing things with it but it is not necessary just to mend plastic. It is only available from dental supply houses but if you are on good terms with a dentist he might order some of it for you. I have heard it called dental acrylic or tray acrylic or methyl-methacrylate. As an insulator I believe it will withstand 100,000 volts. With it you could make a mold and create your own headphone cups, but you would have to practice with it some first. Read the precautions and be safe if you do try to use it.


Oh haha - that sounds pretty hardcore.  I think I'll stick to epoxy and superglue for now but thanks for the suggestion!

 

I decided to play it safe and keep the pillars/shock absorbers for now as I feel like I'm making enough changes as it is.  Should have them back together in a few days and I'll have some more pictures.

post #11288 of 11293
The pillars and shock absorbers decouple the baffle from the cup to reduce vibration--induced distortion.
post #11289 of 11293
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemonkeyflyer View Post

The pillars and shock absorbers decouple the baffle from the cup to reduce vibration--induced distortion.

Excellent information, thanks.

post #11290 of 11293
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemonkeyflyer View Post

The pillars and shock absorbers decouple the baffle from the cup to reduce vibration--induced distortion.


Okay, I think I get it now.  So do the cups and baffles not make solid contact around the outside perimeter and the screw mounting holes?  That would make sense.

 

Do you think they would they still be necessary if you mass load the baffle? 

post #11291 of 11293

That would also explain why the cup threads strip so easily as the shock absorbers create pressure but also have some leeway that probably causes people to overtighten them.  I have noticed on the felt on the rear of my driver that there are 4 pin marks from the pillar so I've probably been tightening them too much.

post #11292 of 11293

I just tested this since my cups are empty and drivers separated so it was easy to see how they do decouple the baffle - there's about 3mm of travel/compression.  I've always thought that resistance was from the cotton stuffing so I never realized this.  But the pads/shock absorbers are fairly pliable and you can easily push the baffle all the way down so it's contacting the cup. 

 

There is a line on the outside of the baffle, which I've noticed before but didn't think anything of it, and I wonder if it's suppose to be a reference for how much the baffle should be tightened.  With the line visible but just above the cup edge it doesn't make contact with the cup.  But if you tighten it more the line disappears and the baffle makes contact with the cup.

 

Doesn't seem like that great of a design though.  I would imagine most people tighten the baffle all the way, making contact with the cup, and negating their purpose of decoupling the baffle from the cup.  I'd think a gasket around the perimeter of the cup and baffle or even just some o-rings on the screws would be more effective.

 

Sorry if this is redundant!  It's interesting to me as I never realized this though.

 

 

post #11293 of 11293
Quote:
Originally Posted by keif View Post

I just tested this since my cups are empty and drivers separated so it was easy to see how they do decouple the baffle - there's about 3mm of travel/compression.  I've always thought that resistance was from the cotton stuffing so I never realized this.  But the pads/shock absorbers are fairly pliable and you can easily push the baffle all the way down so it's contacting the cup. 

There is a line on the outside of the baffle, which I've noticed before but didn't think anything of it, and I wonder if it's suppose to be a reference for how much the baffle should be tightened.  With the line visible but just above the cup edge it doesn't make contact with the cup.  But if you tighten it more the line disappears and the baffle makes contact with the cup.

Doesn't seem like that great of a design though.  I would imagine most people tighten the baffle all the way, making contact with the cup, and negating their purpose of decoupling the baffle from the cup.  I'd think a gasket around the perimeter of the cup and baffle or even just some o-rings on the screws would be more effective.

Sorry if this is redundant!  It's interesting to me as I never realized this though.


Hmm, I was think about it, what would be the point of decoupling? In theory you want the baffle to be as stable as possible, which is why the theory of new plant exists. Unless they are isolating cable noise as much as they can, or just space for venting
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