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Unpopular/Uncommon Musical Opinions - Page 18

post #256 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post



 

It doesn't take much to figure that one out.

 

Insane mind-blowing, well produced 90 sec intro along with Stings's haunting vocal coinciding with the start. (at his highest popularity as a musician).  THAT'S IT!  That's all people listened to.  The rest of the song was ho-hum...boring, generic.



But it isn't a good song, by any means... I don't understand how such a dull, uninspiring song could possibly make it to become one of the most widely recognized songs of the era, up there with real songs like Stairway to Heaven, Dust in the Wind, Freebird, etc. Just doesn't make sense to me.

 


Edited by drgnfrc13 - 2/15/12 at 7:23pm
post #257 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sordel View Post

 

People need to hear past the great recording quality and realise that none of Pink Floyd could write a decent song. Seriously ... show off your hi-fi with some music for a change rather than Rick Wright pressing a key while Dave Gilmour plays a tedious blues scale.

 



When I started listening to Pink Floyd, I was using a $10 portable CD player and headphones that I probably paid under $5 for from a store like Big Lots, and they have been one of my favorite bands since then. IMO, Waters is an amazing songwriter.

 

post #258 of 270



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by walden View Post

YES to 6, 7, and 8

 

Personally I think the Beatles individually aren't very talented, but together wrote great, simple, and very well recorded music that was creative at the time.

 

I agree with #2, but I don't see those bands being but into the same genre except on paper. I just haven't seen anyone really group those bands together but if you say so, okay. Additionally Slayer is not my favorite, but certainly doesn't deserve to be grouped with the following three haha.

 

I'm really interested in #3 because I don't like rap and have only been exposed to people who "ruined" it. What do you recommend? I actually do kind of like A Tribe Called Quest, but that's it.

 

 

 

I don't know how unpopular this is but I haven't looked forward to a new release in years excluding Tool, Opeth and the Black Keys. Most everything else kind of sucks. I listen to Metal, Rock, Jazz, Blues, Prog, Folk, etc. weighted HEAVILY in the years '50-'80.
 



 



Actually, I think some of the solo work by Paul McCartney, and especially John Lennon, aren't bad. It's all the songs like "I am the Walrus" and "Yellow Submarine" that make me hate the band as a whole.

 

As for #2, you wouldn't believe how many times I have come accross webpages, videos, etc. that just lump them all together as "metal." I mainly included Slayer just to show that I'm not just against modern screamo type stuff. I hate all bands that just make pointless noise. Songs like "Raining Blood" just make me want to rip out my eardrums.\

 

And for #3, I like Del Tha Funkee Homosapien (if you can get past the eccentric name, he is a legit artist), Run D.M.C., and Slick Rick.


Edited by drgnfrc13 - 2/15/12 at 7:24pm
post #259 of 270

People who like the "music" of Hans Zimmer have no clue about classical music whatsoever.

 

I met this guy and I know how he "composes" his "music". He will be "working" on about 10 movie soundtracks (on his synth rig) at a time and piecing together bits and fragments of kitchy 19th century romantic crap. At the end he let's some stupid philharmonic orchestra (poor musicians) perform and record his mental diarrhea for a cd version. "Classical" soundtrack music is for the most part utterly pretentious romantic ****.

 

Now there actually are some good soundtracks like Don Ellis' performance for "The French connection".

post #260 of 270


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drgnfrc13 View Post

 

And for #3, I like Del Tha Funkee Homosapien (if you can get past the eccentric name, he is a legit artist), Run D.M.C., and Slick Rick.


Deltron 3030 = classic.

 

post #261 of 270


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drgnfrc13 View Post


IMO, Waters is an amazing songwriter.

 



Amazing, yes, in the sense that someone can write an entire double album whose primary melodic material is the first three notes of a minor scale and not get called on it. I can't help looking at the bit in the movie of The Wall where the teacher quotes the lyrics of 'Money' and thinking: yeah, he's right, they really are awful lyrics.

 

 (I'm exaggerating the opinion of course, but there's more than a touch of truth in it.)

post #262 of 270

I think the term you're looking for is "finely polished turd".

post #263 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sordel View Post


 



Amazing, yes, in the sense that someone can write an entire double album whose primary melodic material is the first three notes of a minor scale and not get called on it. I can't help looking at the bit in the movie of The Wall where the teacher quotes the lyrics of 'Money' and thinking: yeah, he's right, they really are awful lyrics.

 

 (I'm exaggerating the opinion of course, but there's more than a touch of truth in it.)

 

First of all, I would be very impressed with any artist who could make an album on par with The Wall using only 3 notes lol. And secondly, I really don't get how the repetition of certain scales is a problem. Concept albums do tend to keep each song in a similar key to create a certain effect. Especially with The Wall, can you really imagine what it would have been like if each song had been written in a completely different key? The album was intentionally written so that each song flows seamlessly into the next to create what sounds more like one extremely long song. This would not work so well with a significant key shift between each song (that would completely ruin the album, imo).

 

As for Money, I'm pretty sure it wasn't intended to be taken too seriously, but honestly there are many songs out there that are regarded as "classics" that have much less meaningful/creative lyrics. I mean honestly, which is worse:

 

"Hey Jude, don't make it bad
Take a sad song and make it better
Remember to let her into your heart
Then you can start to make it better"

 

OR

 

"Money
So they say
Is the root of all evil today
But if you ask for a raise
It's no surprise that they're giving none away"


Edited by drgnfrc13 - 2/16/12 at 1:45pm
post #264 of 270
Pink Floyd never wrote lyrics to compare with She's Leaving Home or Eleanor Rigby. I'm trying hard to figure out which is the most self indulgent and overrated album of all time, but it's a tie between The Wall and Hotel California.
post #265 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Pink Floyd never wrote lyrics to compare with She's Leaving Home or Eleanor Rigby. I'm trying hard to figure out which is the most self indulgent and overrated album of all time, but it's a tie between The Wall and Hotel California.


My vote goes for The Wall

post #266 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by drgnfrc13 View Post

 

First of all, I would be very impressed with any artist who could make an album on par with The Wall using only 3 notes lol. And secondly, I really don't get how the repetition of certain scales is a problem. Concept albums do tend to keep each song in a similar key to create a certain effect. Especially with The Wall, can you really imagine what it would have been like if each song had been written in a completely different key? The album was intentionally written so that each song flows seamlessly into the next to create what sounds more like one extremely long song. This would not work so well with a significant key shift between each song (that would completely ruin the album, imo).



Of course, you're right, and you could easily have come back at me with West Side Story, which is also largely extrapolated from some very simple thematic material, but in the case of The Wall it's not as though we have a double album in the hands of Wagner or anything; Pink Floyd don't do anything especially clever with their themes (and to be honest it feels like dignifying them to call them themes). Compare it with Tommy, the album that most influenced it, and it's almost desperate how poor The Wall is musically by comparison: subtract Gilmour's solos & Scarfe's artwork and what's left, really? If that album had been recorded by a prog band instead of Pink Floyd, even the prog fans would have long ago dismissed it as minor.

post #267 of 270

I am not a fan of Bon Iver. I just don't find his music enjoyable

post #268 of 270

A turntable is not a musical instrument. The same goes for computers (I'm looking at you electronic music)

post #269 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by PanamaRed View Post

A turntable is not a musical instrument. The same goes for computers (I'm looking at you electronic music)


I think with that logic It would be hard to pick where to draw the line.  What about samplers and synths?  

 

Would you consider a Nord Stage 2 an instrument?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqUECq8buxU

 

How about the Moog Guitar?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8chzLaBSWRo

 

An iPad?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s068C-D-LJw

 

How about an iPhone?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0h2-1zD2pJA

 

or the Maschine?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0K2aynMMBpo

 

Reactable?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sL033Dspq8I

 

 

I'm not ragging on your opinion, this isn't the thread for that.  I am just trying to understand it better, is it using samples, that it's not analog sounds, or do you mean reusing someone else music, Or something else? 

 

post #270 of 270

Just found this thread, and it's time to unload...

 

#1:  I hate Tom Waits and Leonard Cohen.  I'm putting them together mostly because the people I know who like one always like the other.  I think it's because I couldn't care less about the content of lyrics, so I'm missing the "point" or "message" or whatever it is that makes people drool over these guys who can't really hold a solid pitch anymore.

 

#2:  I also can't stand Bjork.  I don't know if this is as controversial in general as it is in my social circle but I can't help but think she's tone deaf.  Admittedly, my exposure is somewhat limited, so if there's an example that would prove otherwise I'd love to see it.

 

#3:  I don't enjoy listening to the Vienna Philharmonic.  Every time I hear one of their recordings it sounds bright and harsh.  I will pick New York, Chicago, or Berlin over Vienna every single time.

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