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Why FLAC is better. - Page 3

post #31 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by rxxdoc View Post
Actually you then have negative mp3's or -mp3! This is a very serious problem and may cause music to disappear from the universe.
That's why blank dvds come in two flavours: +R and -R. You can even bring them together to generate clean renewable energy. The hard part is finding the dilithium crystals to focus the streams.
post #32 of 176
You can just change your cables every 1000 hours as the true high end cable connoisseurs reccomend.

Cables become too loose with aging and the bits flow too easy along them causing them to eventually dissapear. That's why they have cryogenic cables, cryo makes the atoms so aligned that the bit's can't escape to the side.

Warning: if you use cables that are both cryo'd and unidirectional and you connect them the wrong way by mistake, you can cause one of the most dangerous audiophile accidents possible: bit buildup. You do NOT want to see a cd player after it has suffered a bit buildup accident !!!
post #33 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by juntao View Post
Hearing the difference now isn’t the reason to encode to FLAC. FLAC uses lossless compression, while MP3 is ‘lossy’. What this means is that for each year the MP3 sits on your hard drive, it will lose roughly 12kbps, assuming you have SATA – it’s about 15kbps on IDE, but only 7kbps on SCSI, due to rotational velocidensity. You don’t want to know how much worse it is on CD-ROM or other optical media.

I started collecting MP3s in about 2001, and if I try to play any of the tracks I downloaded back then, even the stuff I grabbed at 320kbps, they just sound like crap. The bass is terrible, the midrange…well don’t get me started. Some of those albums have degraded down to 32 or even 16kbps. FLAC rips from the same period still sound great, even if they weren’t stored correctly, in a cool, dry place. Seriously, stick to FLAC, you may not be able to hear the difference now, but in a year or two, you’ll be glad you did.


I believe you are wrong about the rotational velocidensity. Bit loss is caused by natural temperature fluctuations your hard-drive is subjected to when it is turned off; specifically, non-rotational diurnal temperature variation velocidensity. If you leave your hard-drive on (and spinning = no power save mode) you will not lose bits. Bit loss, or Potential errors (Pe) can be simply calculated using the following equation



Here's a handy calculator to help work out your Potential errors (Pe).
post #34 of 176
Poor little juntao, seems to have disappeared from Head-Fi.
post #35 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkk View Post
I personally find it odd that a google search of it yields a post almost identical to yours over at reddit.com.
Yeah, this seems to be making its way around somewhat. Googling for "velocidensity" finds multiple identical postings dated prior to this thread.

Two posts on head-fi and one is an uncredited copy of someone else's words.
post #36 of 176
A shame 'juntao' have not visited Head-Fi since he/she posted the OP.
Cause its clear that he/she is wrongly informed, and for all we know spread this nonsense elsewhere...
post #37 of 176
This is the reason I chiseled all my data onto solid granite. As long as I can keep it away from wind and rain it should last forever.
post #38 of 176
Who bumped THIS thread?
post #39 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by rxxdoc View Post
Please for the sake of our children's music (they will outgrow Hanna Montana)! Help save sound from disappearing from the universe. Give today! Give now!
Why is it always the children that must suffer! count me in
post #40 of 176
cool story bro.
post #41 of 176
This is I swear the most epic troll thread I have ever seen!
post #42 of 176
Hehehe fantastic thread. ;D

If you want to be sure: use checksumming tools like MD5, SHA-1 .. but anyway: LOL
post #43 of 176
Troll thread wasshoi wasshoi!
post #44 of 176
for this reason I usually place an Arm and Hammer box of baking soda in my desktop case right in front of the fans. For my lap top i fill the CD drive with a spoonfull of baking soda and burn a cd of 2livecrew tracks(the "clean" versions of course).
post #45 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by fordgtlover View Post
I believe you are wrong about the rotational velocidensity. Bit loss is caused by natural temperature fluctuations your hard-drive is subjected to when it is turned off; specifically, non-rotational diurnal temperature variation velocidensity. If you leave your hard-drive on (and spinning = no power save mode) you will not lose bits. Bit loss, or Potential errors (Pe) can be simply calculated using the following equation



Here's a handy calculator to help work out your Potential errors (Pe).
Sure, if you are willing to live with the gross approximations yielded by Newtonian physics.

I admit your approximation is fine for most practical engineering applications, but this is the sound SCIENCE section.

I would transpose to account for the curvatures of space time and the increasing density and slowing clock associated with data transfer speeds as they approach the speed of light, and the gravitational effects of the speed of rotation.

The net equation comes out rather simple, as it turns out:

V = ma / c-t

where V = rotational velocidensity
m = mass of drive
a = acceleration of drive
c= speed of light
t = data transfer speed

Obviously, then, as the data transfer speed approaches the speed of light, the rotational velocidensity approaches infinity. One important result is that if data transfer speed exceeds the speed of light, you will get negative rotational velocidensity, a highly volatile state of data transfer to be avoided in the presence of hydrogen. This could result in a data hole, which absorbs and scrambles data at an indefinitely increasing rate.
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