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Please help an extremely frustrated noob to rip his CD collection :-)

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hey guys...

So I've recently been gettin into higher-end audio stuff, and I now need to re-rip my entire CD collection. I know it will be time consuming and a pain, but it needs to be done. 192kbps mp3 doesn't make the grade anymore.

My question is, what format?

I need to rip for two purposes. 1. Archival. 2. to be used on DAPs.

I'm a noob, and i've been searching previous threads for answers, and have been enlightened somewhat, but am still confused. I figured that for archival purposes I would use FLAC.
But A: What compression level do I use?
B: In the event that I need to play these on a DAP, can I convert them to AAC or Mp3 without issue? Or would I need to re-rip my CDs? I guess my quesito is, what is the point of having a FLAC file? I know I can play it on my computer, but is it essentially like having a hard copy, IE- I can convert it to mp3 or aac easily if I have to?

As for my second format...I realize FLACs cant really be played on Ipods or Zunes, which is what I would be using. What is the best format to use on my DAP? I was thinking 320kbps Mp3? What do you guys suggest? I will likely be using a DAC/Amp with higher end headphones in the near future.

Thanks for taking the time to help!
post #2 of 10
Use EAC. Google to find a guide on how to properly configure.

Use FLAC.

FLAC can indeed be played on an iPod. You need to use Rockbox in order to play FLAC on iPods. Google to find out how to install the software.
post #3 of 10
I can only tell you what I do and I only use iPods. I convert all my new and old CDs into Apple lossless and 320 mp3. Whatever lossless version will work on your equipment is good while the mp3s are for car CDs and portable use. If you need smaller versions for some reason you can always create them from the lossless versions. Everything is backed up all over the place so archiving is taken care of.

Mooch
post #4 of 10
I agree with the above, however if you are going to rip to 320kbps, I would rip instead to -v0 variable bitrate. This gives you the quality of 320kbps while saving on disk space. EAC can accomplish this, as can (iirc) foobar. You can also rip to FLAC for when you're on your computer and then transcode those files to -v0 for portable use, if you have the room on your hard drive. iPods are capable of playing back variable bit-rate mp3s, I use them myself on my iPod classic.
post #5 of 10
Thats what a FLAC is, Its a digitized copy that is lossless (as in no data loss). I you have a crap CD, then your FLAC is crap. But IF your CD's good, then you FLAC is good. FLAC is good for archival and is essentially a wav the same as on the CD. If you use the highest compression it will take longer and have a smaller size and vice - versa.
post #6 of 10
Here is a step by step guide for setting up EAC, use the option to rip to FLAC. (» Step-by-Step Guide to Secure CD Ripping with Exact AudioÂ*Copy HipHopIsCoolAgain)

After that you can use something like dbpoweramp to convert your FLACs to MP3/AAC or ALAC - depending on how big your iPod is - for an iPod.

If you're like me and you use a Mac you can have a look around and find a guide to use XLD for ripping and you can use Max to convert your lossless files to other formats.
post #7 of 10
RIP to FLAC for archival and listening purposes. Downconvert to MP3 256 VBR-320 for saving space in your DAP (ipod or the like).
post #8 of 10
ALAC or FLAC is the way to go. Either can be transcoded for DAP use.
On my IPOD Classis 160gb I use only ALAC
On my 8gb Touch I use 256vbr and it sounds very good.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by royalcrown View Post
You can rip to FLAC for when you're on your computer and then transcode those files to -v0 for portable use.
I agree with this, it's what I do. "-v0" is an option for the Lame MP3 encoder.
post #10 of 10
I prefer ALAC simply because I can listen to it on PC and iPod without any extra mess. FLAC has most likely generally more use than ALAC, as that is Apple exclusive as I know. The sound quality however should be exactly the same.
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