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Is Vibration Control helpful with Headphone systems? - Page 2

post #16 of 66
It's absolutely essential for speakers. Speakers are affected by physical surroundings. Headphones aren't as much.
post #17 of 66
Crazy black is back.

Speaker spikes are for foundation rigidity of speaker frames, not vibration control for the cabinet. The method will focus mechanical energy from the frame out as well.
post #18 of 66
Some guy named Michael Fremer (you may have heard of him) sent me a paper from a guy who dealt with micro-vibrations and made an argument that they do exist and that they do affect sound. The question is, if they do they affect sound, is it enough that the human ear can hear them?

I would attach the .pdf file but it is too big and I don't know how to break it up. It was from Audio Perfectionist and the person was Michael Latvis.
post #19 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadcykler View Post
I would attach the .pdf file but it is too big and I don't know how to break it up. It was from Audio Perfectionist and the person was Michael Latvis.
How big is it? Is it under 10 Meg? If so, EMail it to me (steve@q-audio.com) and I'll host it on my website so it can be made available here.

k
post #20 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Camper View Post
Crazy black is back.

Speaker spikes are for foundation rigidity of speaker frames, not vibration control for the cabinet. The method will focus mechanical energy from the frame out as well.
The more rigid the less it vibrates, so it is for vibration.
post #21 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by robm321 View Post
The more rigid the less it vibrates, so it is for vibration.
But spikes don't increase the rigidity of a speaker enclosure.

k
post #22 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick82 View Post
I have found that vibration control devices tune the ground bourne vibrations into other frequencies which makes the audio component only sound different.
Depends on the device.

Some devices can in fact isolate the component from ground borne vibrations.

Quote:
To get better audio the vibrations should be stopped completely. Put the component levitating on Magix and put books on top of the chassis to dampen the internal vibrations.
Mass doesn't dampen. Mass just lowers the resonant frequency. Which could be a good or bad thing depending on the situation.

k
post #23 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koyaan I. Sqatsi View Post
But spikes don't increase the rigidity of a speaker enclosure.

k
It helps anchor it to the floor on carpeting which I assume is what happycamper must have been referring to. On hardwood floors, they usually use spikes with a puck at the bottom to avoid damaging the wood floors, and that would be more to keep vibrations to a minimum.

The purpose of spikes for components and turntables is that they have a minimum footprint on the vibrating surface - transmitting less vibration to the component.
post #24 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koyaan I. Sqatsi View Post
Mass doesn't dampen. Mass just lowers the resonant frequency. Which could be a good or bad thing depending on the situation.
There would be serious problems with skyscrapers if mass didn't dampen.

Tuned Mass Damper
post #25 of 66
I had a tube amp that had a noisy transformer, cheap rubber feet audibly helped remove a bloated smeared bass.
post #26 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by robm321 View Post
There would be serious problems with skyscrapers if mass didn't dampen.
It's not the mass that provides the damping. It's the damping that provides the damping. Take a moment and actually read the article you cited.

k
post #27 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by robm321 View Post
The purpose of spikes for components and turntables is that they have a minimum footprint on the vibrating surface - transmitting less vibration to the component.
Spikes create a hard coupling to the surface they're sitting on so any motion of that surface will be transmitted to the component.

A rubber foot would not couple the two together so well and would also be much more lossy, turning more of the vibrational energy into heat.

k
post #28 of 66
OK your both right, just make the spikes out of rubber or cork. win win
post #29 of 66
You need mass to damp which is why it's called mass damp... ugh never mind.

How'd I allow myself to get drawn into this kind of silliness? All major designers use spikes except the stuff you find at best buy for $40. I guess they got it right with plastic and rubber feet while high end designers are confuse? Maybe you can enlighten them with your very own law of physics. As for me, I'm done here
post #30 of 66
How about rubber coated metal spikes. Maybe nice lead ones.
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