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Sennheiser RS160, 170 ,180... Anyone? - Page 7

post #91 of 448
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdx View Post
or do i need a receiver/amp that has a "Dolby headphone' or similar tech to decode the signal first?
Yes, as the RS-160-180 is analogue-in only.

I've seen anecdotal evidence which suggests that if you use something like the su-dh1, it should work.
I'll be testing it out very soon myself...

*update*
WATSUI earlier in this thread confirmed that the Mixamp + RS180 works nicely for him.
So it's quite likely the same would be true for the SU-DH1...
post #92 of 448
Well, no, the RS series takes a analogue signal, it doesn't have a DAC to decode any kind of digital audio, which is what DTS comes as. It's not so much a matter of whether a headphone is suitable for DTS playback or not, but it's that the Sony and Pioneer include the DAC and processor for DTS as part of the base station. You can always get a separate processing unit, like a SU-DH1, Dolby Headphone or Silent Cinema receiver, or the SVS Realiser - XD. I like my RS180 because it's a good headphone and Kleer works very, very well, and I could afford a SU-DH1 for surround processing. That said, for $120USD equivalent I could have put that money towards a used Yamaha with silent cinema or some equivalent receiver.
post #93 of 448
I was wanting to go the HTPC route mainly to capture audio (including HD) via HDMI and run it through a HRTF filter like DH etc.

But I've since learned that one can't capture A/V via HDMI from an external source sending DRM'd content (BD's etc).*
This is because DRM'd content like BD's are protected by the PAP/PVP schemes.
These protocols do not allow the stream to be decrypted and manipulated before reaching the end source (display/speakers etc)

There are HDMI capture devices on the market, but they're not compatible with HDCP & hence cannot be used to capture BD content.
They're for non-HDCP encrypted content....

So one can only input audio into their PC via S/PDIF-in, which at best can do DD/DTS 5.1...
Not TrueHD or DTS-MA, which is often (but not always) 8ch PCM & has bandwidth requirements that are too high for S/PDIF.
All this isn't as bad as it seems, as many Movies (even BD) still use DD/DTS 5.1, and even more consoles games do.

So as I want DH (or similar) for multi-ch audio, & as I don't yet want an AVR or separates with DH or SS.
I figured I may as well go back to a dedicated S/PDIF-in device like the SU-DH1 etc.

One thing in favour of such devices (& AVR's);
Is that they're not susceptible to A/V de-sync that often occurs with consumer-level soundcards.
This is because unlike the former, the latter's main focus is capture-only, not capture and play.
So they typically don't have an output clock that can synchronise with the input (sources) clock.

Apparently there's ways around this with the right software, but there's a fair bit of mucking around & I've not yet investigated further.
I'll make do with a SU-DH1 or Mixamp, but eventually I'll get a 2nd soundcard that also functions as a S/PDIF-in DD/DTS decode device.
Not because it'll be needed, but just to muck around....

Anyway, many of you were probably aware of most of this, but hopefully it avoids time-wasting for some.

*N.B. one can still play HD audio/video (BD Movies) on a HTPC via 2 means:
1) decrypt & transcode
2) PAP/PVP compliant card/s or on-board + compatible player/s.
I'll usually do the former, but for the times I cant be foobared....
It's nice to know I have hardware that's compliant, & has compatible player/s.
post #94 of 448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ypoknons View Post
Well, no, the RS series takes a analogue signal, it doesn't have a DAC to decode any kind of digital audio, which is what DTS comes as. It's not so much a matter of whether a headphone is suitable for DTS playback or not, but it's that the Sony and Pioneer include the DAC and processor for DTS as part of the base station. You can always get a separate processing unit, like a SU-DH1, Dolby Headphone or Silent Cinema receiver, or the SVS Realiser - XD. I like my RS180 because it's a good headphone and Kleer works very, very well, and I could afford a SU-DH1 for surround processing. That said, for $120USD equivalent I could have put that money towards a used Yamaha with silent cinema or some equivalent receiver.
Understood, and thanks for the explanation. I'm really new to all this so I'm trying to figure out the best solution for my needs. Basically I want to have a wireless headphone that gives me the best 5.1 DTS decoding possible.

So should I get the Senns and pair them with a SU-HD1, or get headphones that have a built-in DTS decoder like the Sonys and Pionneers?
post #95 of 448
The RS-180 + SU-DH1 combination certainly works, it's probably the better solution if you're good with spending the extra money. What I've read about the DS6000 is not that impressive at any rate... Plus, Kleer wireless is excellent, very little interference and signal interruption. And oh, for movies you can also do the processing in software, Cyberlink DVD includes a decoder.
post #96 of 448
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdx View Post
Understood, and thanks for the explanation. I'm really new to all this so I'm trying to figure out the best solution for my needs. Basically I want to have a wireless headphone that gives me the best 5.1 DTS decoding possible.

So should I get the Senns and pair them with a SU-HD1, or get headphones that have a built-in DTS decoder like the Sonys and Pionneers?
as I said in my earlier response the su-dh1 should work.
And as the rs180 is most probably the best wireless headphones on the market.*
su-dh1 + rs180 = better than Sony, Pioneer, or Panasonic for a wireless DH (or similar) solution.

*& believe me I've researched that one....
http://www.head-fi.org/forums/f4/bes...3/#post6095543
high fidelity wireless headphones - AVS Forum
post #97 of 448
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdx View Post
Understood, and thanks for the explanation. I'm really new to all this so I'm trying to figure out the best solution for my needs. Basically I want to have a wireless headphone that gives me the best 5.1 DTS decoding possible.

So should I get the Senns and pair them with a SU-HD1, or get headphones that have a built-in DTS decoder like the Sonys and Pionneers?
That all depends on your preference between a DTS/Dolby built-in decoder vs SQ (sound quality). Comparing Sony, Pioneer and Sennheiser, obviously Sennheiser's RS 180 is a clear winner in terms of SQ. So I'd personally prefer RS 180 over the other two...

As suggested by others who have tried, RS 180 sounds great when paired with a dedicated digital sound processor for DTS & Dolby.
post #98 of 448

Hi to everyone, I'm new here!  :)

I have the Sennheiser rs180 and I'm very happy with my purchase.

There's only one thing bothering me: the charging led never goes off! Does it happen to some of you too? In the manual it's written that it should go off when the batteries are fully charged! Is my product defective?  :(

post #99 of 448
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaiou View Post

Hi to everyone, I'm new here!  :)

I have the Sennheiser rs180 and I'm very happy with my purchase.

There's only one thing bothering me: the charging led never goes off! Does it happen to some of you too? In the manual it's written that it should go off when the batteries are fully charged! Is my product defective?  :(


Hi kaiou,

 

It may take several charging cycles for some batteries to be conditioned in order to trigger trickle-charging mode. Even if the LED indication is on, the battery is expected to be fully charged within 10-12 hours (or in less than 16 hours). It does not mean that your unit is defective.

post #100 of 448

Did you ever "hack" the transmitter auto-off?  I just bought a pair of 160s and the auto off "feature" is a deal killer.  Is there any way to wire the transmitter power to bypass the on/off switch?  Is there a 3rd party Kleer transmitter that can work with the 160s that does not turn itself off?

Quote:
Originally Posted by huigter View Post

My only annoyance is that the transmitter goes to "sleep" after a few minutes of inactivity. Presumably this is just to save energy. This is a bigggg annoyance for me. I would rather not have to walk over to the transmitter to have to power the transmitter on. Perhaps someday I will hack the transmitter to bypass this issue.



 

Edited by AlanW - 7/31/10 at 8:30am
post #101 of 448

I thought I might as well post here as I am the proud owner of a Sennheiser RS 170. I live in Holland and I got these headphones as soon as they were available (online), which set me back 200 EUR. It always takes some time when products are introduced in the USA to be available in Europe as well. But I was eager to get them asap seeing I already molested my Fatal1ty Professinal Gaming Headset MK II within just a few weeks (broke the cord by trembling over several times) after purchase. When I am typing this post the headphones are 147 EUR on the cheapest (web)shop in Holland, so prices already went down quite a bit. 

The manual does not say all that much but it doesn't has to. Setup is pretty easy if you just read what is written on the transmitter itself. What else can I say. The sound quality is awesome for a wireless set of cans. I can walk or even run from the basement to upstairs without any loss of sound quality/ connection. Also can step outside and I still hear what is going on my computer inside the house. Only the chance of loss of connection is a lot bigger if you don't walk in a direct line from the transmitter (in the house itself this doesn't matter though!, as stated above ''able to run throughout the whole house'')

 

Major downside of these baby's are that they leak (too much) sound at higher volumes. Also one could say they don't block out sounds as well as other cans but they still do fairly well at this point for my concern. Cranking up the volume will definately let you not hear the others but you got to be carefull about your ears of course. As far as looks go they are not the most beautiful headphones out there, but this isn't a real concern to me. Another bad point of these cans is that the earcup(s) (I don't know which one or that both do this) rattle if you walk, but if you have music playing while walking you will not notice any of this. 

 

As comfort goes these are suitable for long hour listening sessions. Sometimes I witness a little bit of discomfort but when I re-adjust the earcups everything is just fine (and this is like when I already have used the for 2+ hours).  I also think surround sound is most suitable for gaming with these cans and where ass the bass function on the transmitter gives a fun sound it will drive you mad after a few hours. I prefer keeping the bass and surround function off. 

 

Highly recommended cans for someone who is looking for wireless cans in their house (although I haven't tested other headphones in this department) that can handle all types of music.

 

Just my 2 cents and I hope I could have been of some help with my post. 


Edited by latent - 7/31/10 at 4:02pm
post #102 of 448

Has anyone figured out a way to force the RS-160 transmitter to stay on all of the time?

post #103 of 448
Quote:
su-dh1 + rs180 = better than Sony, Pioneer, or Panasonic for a wireless DH (or similar) solution.


Sorry if the question could seem silly, but I'm a newbie in headphones and surround adapters.

 

With RS 180 and SU-DH1 (or Mixamp, or similar) plugged in the headphone-out of my TV, can I get a surround effect? Or have I to plug the DH1 into the optical out of an HT set?

 

The same for PC: in order to get a surround sound from RS 180, where have I to connect the DH1? To a stereo jack (I have one in the case and one in the Logitech z5500 control center) or to an optical out in the soundcard?

 

My last doubt (for now :P ): is the surround effect really spacious and directional (rear to front and so)?

 

Thanks again!!

post #104 of 448

Headphone out on your TV doesn't carry multi-ch audio....

You have to use a source/interface that carries multi-ch audio (e.g. DD/DTS 5.1) i.e. toslink or mini-toslink.

It plugs into the su-dh1 which remixes that 5.1 source into stereo simulated surround, and then passes that on to the RS-180.


Edited by jalyst - 9/6/10 at 11:19pm
post #105 of 448
Thanks jalyst: I'll check if my old HT set has a toslink output...
 
And what about the surround sound? Are the effects simulated by the SU-DH1 and a simply stereo headset enough "directional"?
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