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How long for a CD to burn in? - Page 4

post #46 of 68
Also check out the Furutech DeMag - it demagnetizes your CDs so they sound way better!

6moons audio reviews: Furutech DeMag
post #47 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speederlander View Post
How can that reviewer take crap like this seriously?
They don't have ANY explanation at all because it's a fraud.
I've been a huge believer in photon cannons for as long as I can remember. I use them daily. They help me see my path at night, they even play a huge role in my audio reproduction. Without them I wouldn't even be able to figure out what to play... I'd be left in the dark.
post #48 of 68
Wow, 6moons has lost all credibility with me after those two reviews about the photon canon and the CD demagnetizer. -.- How do they think these are serious products?
post #49 of 68
Thread Starter 
so...do scratches on the cd can cause more jitter? if the answer is yes, I will stop buying used cds...too bad, to many great findings in the second hand department.
post #50 of 68
read errors on CD's are only meaningful in 1X standalone players, on a PC audio is usually cached so it won't matter. rip your discs w/ EAC on your HDD in FLAC/ALAC, and scratched CD's pretty much won't matter...as long EAC says that the rip is fine.
post #51 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by leeperry View Post
read errors on CD's are only meaningful in 1X standalone players, on a PC audio is usually cached so it won't matter. rip your discs w/ EAC on your HDD in FLAC/ALAC, and scratched CD's pretty much won't matter...as long EAC says that the rip is fine.
that makes sence...but what about real time cd reading, like a cd player?
I read it somewhere in an article, but I may understood it all wrong. he was talking about sort of "gaps" in the cd that can cause jitter, but it can be that he didn't mean to a gaps caused by scratches and such.
post #52 of 68
well, most recent standalone players use PC drive units internally anyway...so they also read ahead and cache audio.
post #53 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by leeperry View Post
well, most recent standalone players use PC drive units internally anyway...so they also read ahead and cache audio.
thanks...I can buy used cds again.
post #54 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by plonter View Post
Hi all. Have anyone ever noticed a change in the sound of a cd after playing it a couple of times?
I noticed that some cds can sound pretty cold and dry in the first couple of times playing...but after a few times they get more smooth and warm sounding.
this change is more audible in some cds and less audible with others.
Have you read the fairy tale "Henny-Penny?" It's a story of Henny-Penny, a chicken. One day, an acorn falls on her head. Since she is a chicken, she doesn't realize that it was an acorn that falls on her head. Instead, she concludes that the sky was falling. Henny-Penny then proceeds to spread word to all the other farm animals that the sky is falling, just like many myths get propagated and reinforced on certain internet audio forums. Long story short, Henny-Penny and the other farm animals are tricked into Foxy-Loxy's lair and eaten. Similarly, people are tricked into spending thousands of dollars on tweaks and equipment because they draw faulty conclusions from their observations.

So, do you REALLY think that the CD changes in sound? *OR* perhaps it could be that your changing mood and emotional status as well as dissimilar listening volumes influence your perception of the sound over time?
post #55 of 68
Well, it just so happens, that Henny-Penny was RIGHT!
I read it on the net.
So there. Another myth-understanding put to rest.
post #56 of 68
Do you guys also burn in the air of your rooms?

You know that it can affect sound, no? (How transducers move air in order to produce sound). I recommend a mix "Helium/oxigen/carbon monoxide" -20-75-5-. It gives more presence to the sound, the bass becomes punchy, and the highs sound perfect, without sibilance. Only downside is you might feel dizzy, and your voice changes a bit.
post #57 of 68
I believe helium-oxygen-carbon monoxide in 20-75-5 is kinda lethal. lol

You might as well try hydrogen-oxygen in 66-33, at least you'll go out with a bang.
post #58 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by EugeneK View Post
I believe helium-oxygen-carbon monoxide in 20-75-5 is kinda lethal. lol

You might as well try hydrogen-oxygen in 66-33, at least you'll go out with a bang.
Yeah, that is why I put the carbon monoxide there (and helium too ), to see if anyone really contemplated the idea
post #59 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by EugeneK View Post
Wow, 6moons has lost all credibility with me after those two reviews about the photon canon and the CD demagnetizer. -.- How do they think these are serious products?
I can't speak for the «Intelligent Chip». The demagnetizer on the other hand could have some merit:

Quote:
Originally Posted by SixMoons.com
The aluminum used for the reflective CD layer is contaminated with ferrous impurities and thus susceptible to magnetizing. Ditto for the ink used for printing the label. When the CD spins at up to 500 RPM, these ferrous particles begin to act as magnets as they are moving in a -- however small -- magnetic field. Let's assume that after an hour's play, all magnetizable particles have activated. We'll thus have a fair amount of magnets rotating inside a magnetic field. Little imagination is required to appreciate that such magnets could have a detrimental effect on all electronic circuits in the vicinity. As we have reported in our article on copying CDs to improve their sound quality, a great deal of the CD system is analog in nature and thus very much prone to external influences such as moving magnetic fields.
I wouldn't hold my breath neither for SixMoons nor the Furutech or demagnetizers in general, but I've read positive reviews about CD demagnetizers from several sources. A positive effect isn't entirely impossible.
.
post #60 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speederlander View Post
Cat 6 cables if you run network storage are even more critical for burn-in.
No, no, no - if your music is ever transferred over a network, you must use the Ultra Premium Denon Link cables. After all, others don't have special shielding against data loss.
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