or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › Shootout: 114 Portable Headphones Reviewed (Xiaomi Mi Headphones added 04/21/2015)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Shootout: 114 Portable Headphones Reviewed (Xiaomi Mi Headphones added 04/21/2015) - Page 191

post #2851 of 4545
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gryphus0204 View Post

But is the difference very significant? Cause I really like the design and accessories of the v-80... And if the significance is not that big I would prefer the v80 


They are both good headphones, if that's what you want to know. You asked which is more suitable but it seems you've already made up your mind. The V-Modas sound great and I'm sure you'll like them.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

If someone sends ljokerl a pair, sure. wink.gif But my guess is that the CX485 is somewhat similar to the CX281. It would be far more interesting to see a review of the OCX880. (If someone sends him a pair, of course!)
EDIT:
Yikes! Didn't realize this was the Portable Headphone thread! I'll remind myself not to post on Head-Fi before I've had my morning coffee!


Happens all the time rolleyes.gif. I still haven't gotten around to my IE6 and IE7 anyway and I plan to spend some time on the portable thread soon.

post #2852 of 4545

Looking for the most portable circumaurals. No flying buttress look (empty space between head and headband), short cable, lightweight. Honestly do not care about sound compared to my other priorities such as the above mentioned portability, along with comfort and a look that won't get me shot in public.

post #2853 of 4545

I'm just wondering if you still use your K81, and how it has held up. I also wanted to know if the K81 is the same as the K518LE, as I read some threads saying they sounded significantly different.

 

I just bought the K518LE and am hoping it'll hold up to being thrown in a backpack.

post #2854 of 4545
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UCLA 15 View Post

Looking for the most portable circumaurals. No flying buttress look (empty space between head and headband), short cable, lightweight. Honestly do not care about sound compared to my other priorities such as the above mentioned portability, along with comfort and a look that won't get me shot in public.


JVC HA-S700. Sounds decent enough but also has a great form factor - small, comfortable, good isolation.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raguvian View Post

I'm just wondering if you still use your K81, and how it has held up. I also wanted to know if the K81 is the same as the K518LE, as I read some threads saying they sounded significantly different.

 

I just bought the K518LE and am hoping it'll hold up to being thrown in a backpack.



I sold mine when I got a K181. I had the K81 for nearly a year and it survived like a champ. I've never heard th K518 but if you ask AKG they'll tell you it's the same driver.

post #2855 of 4545

Thanks for your help joker:D

Really appreciated it and love your IEM reviews:D

post #2856 of 4545
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post


JVC HA-S700. Sounds decent enough but also has a great form factor - small, comfortable, good isolation.


 



I sold mine when I got a K181. I had the K81 for nearly a year and it survived like a champ. I've never heard th K518 but if you ask AKG they'll tell you it's the same driver.



Good to know, thanks! To be honest the only reason I got the K518 over the K81 was because the K518 was being sold by Amazon directly and the K81 was being sold by a 3rd party, and I wasn't sure if they were an authorized reseller.

post #2857 of 4545

What do you think of the soul sl150 then? Cause I wanna buy the v-moda v80 as an upgrade 

post #2858 of 4545

Hi, I want to buy some under 50$ headphones, and i'm stuck between Pioneer SE-M 390 and Superlux HD668B. I can get the Pioneer at 42$, including shipping, and the Superlux at 48$, also including shipping. I saw the Spuerlux in the 96 reviewed here (btw, Amazing Work! Congratulations, and thank you!). I was just wondering what do you guis think about this Pioneer model, as it seems to be similar to the  SE-MJ5 reviewed here (maybe a bit better?). Do they have a similar sound? I'd highly appreciate any response. I also saw in the review the Philips SHP5401. I have owned then until returning them, because i considered that they have kind of a weak base when plugged into my laptop/mp3, and even though i mostly thought that the sound was terrific for many songs (i listen to 80's rock, acoustic music, piano, violin, but without some bass into the mix, songs like Lux Aeterna from Clint Mansell, don't sound "epic" at all), i just felt that i could get something a little bit "better". What do you think? Should i get them back, i don't have to pay shipping so they cost me 30$ in total (really cheap!), and honestly i would be totally happy with them. beyersmile.png 

A small edit: Considering i get replies to purchase Superlux and i do go for them, which one would be better for my musical tastes, the semi-open HD668B or the closed HD669 (can get them at exactly the same price - love the looks of the 668, not so much the 669, but no clue about the sound). Any idea on the sound differences between them? TY!


Edited by Saethyan - 1/30/12 at 11:46am
post #2859 of 4545

 

Quick question, I have the Beyerdynamic DT235s and love the sound, the bass, mids and treble are all fine. BUT they need an amp, they just don't go loud enough on either my sansa clip or from my Asus DS soundcard.

 

I was going to buy a Fiio E11 for £41, but I noticed the Sony ZX700 on offer for £55 and having read that they don't need an amp to reach good volumes I'm wondering if it might be a better way to go. 

 

As I enjoy the DT 235s do you think the ZX700s would be a good upgrade for me?

 

Many thanks

Dan

post #2860 of 4545

Hey joker, what would you say if I compromise between the sennheiser hd and the v moda m80s by grabbing a gradosr60 AND the m-80s? I figure that this would be a cheaper alternative to this yin-yang relationship you pointed out, the two still being opposite sound signatures. Portability would be more of an issue with the grados, but in dire cases I could just carry around my m80s

post #2861 of 4545
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gryphus0204 View Post

What do you think of the soul sl150 then? Cause I wanna buy the v-moda v80 as an upgrade 


If you're asking me, I've never heard them.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Saethyan View Post

Hi, I want to buy some under 50$ headphones, and i'm stuck between Pioneer SE-M 390 and Superlux HD668B. I can get the Pioneer at 42$, including shipping, and the Superlux at 48$, also including shipping. I saw the Spuerlux in the 96 reviewed here (btw, Amazing Work! Congratulations, and thank you!). I was just wondering what do you guis think about this Pioneer model, as it seems to be similar to the  SE-MJ5 reviewed here (maybe a bit better?). Do they have a similar sound? I'd highly appreciate any response. I also saw in the review the Philips SHP5401. I have owned then until returning them, because i considered that they have kind of a weak base when plugged into my laptop/mp3, and even though i mostly thought that the sound was terrific for many songs (i listen to 80's rock, acoustic music, piano, violin, but without some bass into the mix, songs like Lux Aeterna from Clint Mansell, don't sound "epic" at all), i just felt that i could get something a little bit "better". What do you think? Should i get them back, i don't have to pay shipping so they cost me 30$ in total (really cheap!), and honestly i would be totally happy with them. beyersmile.png 

A small edit: Considering i get replies to purchase Superlux and i do go for them, which one would be better for my musical tastes, the semi-open HD668B or the closed HD669 (can get them at exactly the same price - love the looks of the 668, not so much the 669, but no clue about the sound). Any idea on the sound differences between them? TY!



I've never heard the M390, personally. Do you have the option of getting an MJ5? Seen it on sale for <$40 a few times recently here in the states and I think you would like the sound better than the HD668B (based on the HD668B having somewhat delicate bass punch a-la SHP5401). No idea what the differences between the HD669 and HD668B are.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Caratacus View Post

 

Quick question, I have the Beyerdynamic DT235s and love the sound, the bass, mids and treble are all fine. BUT they need an amp, they just don't go loud enough on either my sansa clip or from my Asus DS soundcard.

 

I was going to buy a Fiio E11 for £41, but I noticed the Sony ZX700 on offer for £55 and having read that they don't need an amp to reach good volumes I'm wondering if it might be a better way to go. 

 

As I enjoy the DT 235s do you think the ZX700s would be a good upgrade for me?

 

Many thanks

Dan


The ZX700 is generally warmer than the DT235 but otherwise should be an upgrade. However, the DT235, while less efficient than the average portable, is not exactly a high-end full-size set in terms of difficulty to drive. Unless your clip is volume capped you are probably risking your hearing by maxing them. The ZX700 will go louder, but not by a huge margin.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by vaed View Post

Hey joker, what would you say if I compromise between the sennheiser hd and the v moda m80s by grabbing a gradosr60 AND the m-80s? I figure that this would be a cheaper alternative to this yin-yang relationship you pointed out, the two still being opposite sound signatures. Portability would be more of an issue with the grados, but in dire cases I could just carry around my m80s



It's a strange compromise between two closed cans but the Grado signature will be significantly different from the M-80s and will therefore offer a good compliment to it. I doubt you will use the Grados outside often.


Edited by ljokerl - 1/30/12 at 8:48pm
post #2862 of 4545

can u somehow consider including the shure srh 440/840 in this list? that would be very interesting ....

post #2863 of 4545
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by turgid View Post

can u somehow consider including the shure srh 440/840 in this list? that would be very interesting ....



Even if I did it would be months before anything was posted about it.

post #2864 of 4545

Is a portable amp pretty much going to be necessary to get a satisfactory sound out of my HP700s from the Clip+? My J3 broke shortly after I bought them and I can't afford another one, so I'm thinking of getting a Clip+.

post #2865 of 4545
Thread Starter 

Added Sony MDR-PQ2 and Philips O'Neill SHO9560

 

 

 

Quote:
 
(C33) Sony PIIQ MDR-PQ2 Giiq: Lightweight portable headphone from Sony’s style-oriented PIIQ line

Sony MDR-PQ2 PIIQ Giiq.jpg

Build Quality (6.5/10): The PQ2 is part of Sony’s PIIQ series of style-focused headphones – a design clearly taken out of the Skullcandy fashion playbook. The build is mostly plastic although there is a bit of rubber covering the hinges on the cups. The headband is padded in cloth while the earpads are made of thin pleather. Strangely, the PQ2 can neither fold nor collapse – not a great design choice for portability but leaves less to go wrong. The cable is a flat and slightly softer than the cords found on Sony’s XB-series models. Below the Y-split it becomes rather thick, almost square in cross section. The cord is terminated with an impressively heavy-duty L-plug. My particular pair is also colored differently on either side – one of the cups is blue and the other is green. The left/right markings written out in cursive are a nice touch.

Comfort (8/10): Though the structure of the PQ2 does not fold or collapse, the headphones have plenty of play in the cups and actually clamp rather softly. The plastic shell also weighs next to nothing and the cushy cloth-padded headband is one of the best I’ve come across in the PQ2’s price range.

Isolation (5.5/10): The moderate clamping force of the cups leaves much to be desired with the isolation of the PQ2 despite the closed-back design.

Sound (5.75/10): The PQ2’s flashy exterior belies a surprisingly tame and well-balanced sound signature. The 30mm drivers are a major upgrade from Sony’s older 30mm transducers used by models such as the MDR-770LP and compete well with most entry-level sets. The low end is mildly rolled-off, but punchy and enjoyable. Bass detail is mediocre but the softness and bloat of the 770LP are nowhere to be found. The PQ2 is still slightly warm – warmer, for example, than the more controlled and extended Urbanears Plattan – but not muddy considering the price.

The midrange of the PQ2 is balanced well with the bass response – similar to that of the Plattan, but appearing more prominent due to the less impactful bass of the Sonys. The similarly-priced MDR-770LP is far more mid-forward but lacks the crispness and detail of the PQ2. Guitars don’t have any bite with the 770LP while the PQ2 performs adequately. Clarity is good as well - on par with the more expensive Soundmagic P30 and Marshall Major. The PQ2 does lag behind the pricier sets in note thickness and smoothness, appearing a bit grainy but not quite harsh. The metallic highs of the brighter, thinner-sounding Pioneer SE-MJ71 are far more fatiguing than the slightly grainy top end of the Sonys. The presentation of the Sonys is not very impressive – there is some width to the soundstage but not very much depth, causing the headphones to sound rather flat. The PQ2 may not be as congested as the older entry-level Sonys tend to be, but it is average at best when it comes to instrument separation and layering.

Value (8/10). (MSRP: $49.99; Street Price: $29) Sony’s style-focused portable is a cheap headphone done right - simple in construction, inoffensive in sound signature, lightweight, and comfortable. The sound of the PQ2 is well-balanced, clear, and punchy, making for a well-rounded listening experience. Those looking for deep, rumbling bass and high passive noise isolation will want to steer clear but otherwise, funky as it may look, the PQ2 is a reasonably-priced alternative to disappointing performers such as the Cloud Colors and Pioneer SE-MJ71.

Manufacturer Specs:
Frequency Response: 10-24,000 Hz
Impedance: 24 Ω
Sensitivity: 100 dB SPL/1mW
Cord: 3.94ft (1.2m); Angled Plug
Space-Saving Mechanism: N/A

 

 

 

Quote:
 
(B33) Philips O’Neill SHO9560 “The Stretch”: Rugged result of the collaboration between Philips and surf gear manufacturer O'Neill

Philips O'Neill SHO9560 The Stretch.jpg

Build Quality (9/10): As the flagship of Philips’ new O’Neill headphone line, the SHO9560 is claimed to be ruggedized to survive the dangers of extreme sports. The semi-transparent frame of the headphones is a single mold of TR55LX nylon – a stretchable polycarbonate-type material capable of deforming significantly before breaking. One would have to try very, very hard to damage the frame. There are no length adjustments on the headband but the inner cloth band stretches to accommodate larger noggins. The cups are attached to the frame with pegs and can move about the horizontal axis. They are matte on the outside and padded with soft pleather. The single-sided cable is interesting as well – it is not detachable at the cup but instead features a breakaway point about 2” down. It is nylon-sheathed, thick, and flexible. Best of all, it can be replaced with any 3.5mm extension cord should anything go wrong.

Comfort (9/10): The Stretch is a small circumaural headphone a-la Maxell DHP-II and JVC HA-S700. The pleather pads are soft and the cups are deep. The inner headband stretches easily to accommodate larger heads and yet keeps the headphones secure enough to be used during physical activity. The flexible nylon frame provides a supple fit with moderate clamp, remaining comfortable for hours.

Isolation (8/10): The Stretch is fully closed and isolates about as much as a small closed circumaural should. Leakage is not a problem and I was able to use them on my commute without issue

Sound (6.25/10): As a large electronics brand that hasn’t produced a high-end headphone in a number of years, Philips really has no ‘house sound’. Many of the brand’s lower-end models attempt to provide ground-quaking bass but fall short on the clarity and detail front. Not so with the SHO9560 – the bass is really quite tame for a mainstream youth-oriented headphone. There is a mild mid-bass hump as well as good punch and body but calling the SHO9560 a bassy headphone is – pardon the pun – a stretch. The bass is not the quickest, nor is it the tightest, sounding a little muddy at times, but it still beats the Monster Beats Solo in control and accuracy. The low end of the similarly-priced Maxell DHP-II is slightly deeper and fuller than that of the SHO9560 but colors the sound more.

Midrange clarity lags behind headphones such as the DHP-II and Sennheiser PX100-II but the overall tone is quite neutral and detail is decent. In terms of positioning the midrange of the SHO9560 is a tad recessed but the reasonable amount of bass emphasis makes this a non-issue. Midrange smoothness is good and the headphones remain pleasant all the way up. Treble extension is decent and there’s a bit of sparkle up top. The mild treble unevenness does not cause significant harshness or sibilance. Crispness and clarity aren’t quite as impressive as with the DHP-II but not really lacking for a modestly-priced set. The presentation is average for a set in the price range. The soundstage is medium-sized and layering is merely competent. The SHO9560 is not a spacious-sounding headphone like the open PX100-II and Ultrasone HFI-15G, but it is not nearly as congested as the Beats Solo, either.

Value (8.5/10). (MSRP: $79.99, Street Price: $50) There is no doubt that the SHO9560 is a very versatile portable headphone – lightweight, durable, and user-friendly all around. Its biggest shortcoming is the slight blandness of the sound - next to the superb build quality and comfort, the sound leaves something to be desired. For those who put functionality first, the SHO9560 is easily worth the purchase, especially considering the reasonable street prices of late. If sound quality is priority number one, however, money is better spent on a Sennheiser HD428 or Beyerdynamic DT235.

Manufacturer Specs:
Frequency Response: 12-24,000 Hz
Impedance: 32 Ω
Sensitivity: 105 dB SPL/1mW
Cord: 3.94ft (1.2m), single-sided, detachable; Straight Plug
Space-Saving Mechanism: N/A

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcoffeex1 View Post

Is a portable amp pretty much going to be necessary to get a satisfactory sound out of my HP700s from the Clip+? My J3 broke shortly after I bought them and I can't afford another one, so I'm thinking of getting a Clip+.


If you enjoyed them straight out of the J3 you might be okay. I would definitely give it a shot - they like power but don't sound terrible unamped. Should still be better than anything you could trade them in for.

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › Shootout: 114 Portable Headphones Reviewed (Xiaomi Mi Headphones added 04/21/2015)