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Shootout: 113 Portable Headphones Reviewed (Alpha Design Labs ADL H118 added 07/15/14) - Page 279

post #4171 of 4385
I've read they sound similar but CAL2 is bassier. I think CAL1 has more than enough bass, so I can see people preferring the first.
post #4172 of 4385
Thread Starter 

Posted the first part of my CES impressions here. I went through the show trying to test out headphones and IEMs that were new (to me, at least). This first set of impressions includes headphones from Phiaton, Klipsch, Bell'O Digital, and others.

 

Cliffnotes verson - part 1

 

*Bell'O Digital had several headphones available for demo but none of them impressed me

*Klipsch's new Status over-ear cans were better, but did not keep up with the similarly-priced Sennheiser, Sony, and Phiaton cans I tried. I was able to learn about the new X11 model but neither it nor the X7 were available for Demo

*Wicked Audio's new Revolt headphones felt a little cheap and didn't sound good enough for $200. Built-in DSP by Bongiovi Acoustics boosted the bass and treble.

*Phiaton's MS 430 was among the best portable headphones I tried, with clear sound, nice materials, and a reasonable price tag. The pricier MS 500 was less impressive.

*Etymotic's new HD5 model is internally identical to the ETY-Kids

*Jabra's Revo headphones feature nice construction and overwhelming bass

*Westone has a full-size headphone forthcoming. Most of the new models are rehashes of previous sets with no changes to the tuning, but feature new housings (for the universal-fit sets) and MMCX coaxial connectors. The W50 and W60 were not available for demo.

 

For full impressions and photos, see here: http://theheadphonelist.com/ces-2014-headphone-coverage-part-1-klipsch-phiaton-westone-and-more/

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inks View Post

I've read they sound similar but CAL2 is bassier. I think CAL1 has more than enough bass, so I can see people preferring the first.

 

This is accurate based on what I'm hearing from the CAL! 2.


Edited by ljokerl - 1/12/14 at 6:47pm
post #4173 of 4385

P7s? They would probably top this list. 

post #4174 of 4385

joker. takstar pro80 :)

post #4175 of 4385
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolguyalex View Post
 

P7s? They would probably top this list. 

 

Sorry, never tried it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lisagorbin View Post
 

joker. takstar pro80 :)

 

The look like a closed version of the Technical Pro HPT990: http://www.amazon.com/Technical-Pro-HPT990-Professional-Headphones/dp/B0057CW4UU, which I bought and returned due to mediocre sound quality. It looked great though and came with a metal case.

post #4176 of 4385
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post
 

The look like a closed version of the Technical Pro HPT990: http://www.amazon.com/Technical-Pro-HPT990-Professional-Headphones/dp/B0057CW4UU, which I bought and returned due to mediocre sound quality. It looked great though and came with a metal case.

And the Technical Pro HPT990 is a clone of Takstar HI 2050 (http://www.amazon.com/Takstar-Monitor-Headphone-Computer-Koolertron/dp/B009PIQUB6/ref=pd_cp_e_0) which can be bought for 69$ (sometimes cheaper). Good for the price I think. But not for over 100$.

post #4177 of 4385

Agree, HPT990 is clone of HI2050, not Takstar Pro 80.

 

Gemini HSR-1000 is a clone of Takstar Pro 80.  I have the HSR-1000 and it's very good; comparable to JVC HA-S500.  $55 shipped, get it Joker :D

 

http://www.amazon.com/Gemini-DJ-HSR-1000-Professional-Monitoring/dp/B006Y2BI04


Edited by Grayson73 - 1/24/14 at 7:49am
post #4178 of 4385
Quote:

I've had the HSR-1000 and it's very good; comparable to JVC HA-S500.

 

So, in other words, the HSR-1000 is quite warmly tilted (I have the S500s as well)? 

post #4179 of 4385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darknecron View Post
 

 

So, in other words, the HSR-1000 is quite warmly tilted (I have the S500s as well)? 

Agree that both are warmly tilted, but that makes them better for pop and rock.  That being said, I wouldn't say either are dark.

post #4180 of 4385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grayson73 View Post
 

Agree, HPT990 is clone of HI2050, not Takstar Pro 80.

 

Gemini HSR-1000 is a clone of Takstar Pro 80.  I have the HSR-1000 and it's very good; comparable to JVC HA-S500.

The JVC HA-s500 is around 40$? I thought it was sarcasm until i saw your gear list. so which do you prefer overall?


Edited by lisagorbin - 1/24/14 at 8:56am
post #4181 of 4385
Thread Starter 

Added a new review - Munitio PRO40

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post
 

 

(A23) Munitio PRO40 

 

 

MSRP: $349.99 (manufacturer’s page)

Current Price: $200 from amazon.com

Frequency Response: 12-20,000 Hz | Impedance: 32 Ω | Sensitivity: 102 dB SPL/1mW
Form factor: over-the-ear | Space-Saving Mechanism: N/A
Cord: detachable, 4ft (1.2m) straight | 8ft (2.4m) coiled

Build Quality (10/10): The construction of the PRO40 impresses right out of the box – the headphones are built largely out of a durable aluminum alloy and the few parts that aren’t, are made of hard, sturdy plastic. The rubber headband pad and pleather earcups are soft and pleasant to the touch. The 3.5mm jack is located on the left earcup and the headphone comes with two interchangeable cords – a nylon-sheathed portable-length cable with microphone and 3-button remote, and a long coiled cable with ¼” adapter for studio use (note: the coiled cable will not be included in the box with the first batch of the headphones, but will be available to customers at no additional charge via the Munitio website). Both cables are very well-made, utilizing high-grade materials and a design that shows good attention to detail. The headphones also come with a very sturdy hard-shell carrying case.

Comfort (8.5/10): Despite the bulletproof construction, the PRO40 is not a heavy headphone and fits on the head very securely thanks to what Munitio calls CODA AXIS technology – a mechanism that affords the earcup a wide range of motion independent of the rest of the headphone. The same mechanism keeps the headphones comfortable, though the protein leather earpads can get a touch warm with extended wear.

Isolation (8/10): The soft pads and adjustable fit provide a good seal between headphone and ear. Isolation is above average and noise leakage is average for a headphone of this size.

Sound (7.75/10): Not unlike Munitio’s in-ear earphones, the company’s first full-size headphone delivers smooth sound underpinned by powerful bass. The bass response of the titanium-coated drivers used in the PRO40 beats everything I’ve heard since the Denon AH-D1100 in quantity, boasting both great impact and depth. The PRO40 sounds bassier than the vTrue model from subwoofer manufacturer Velodyne, and much bassier than the V-Moda M-80.

Some bloat is to be expected considering the bass quantity, but on the whole the PRO40 holds up rather well. Its bass tends to be more intrusive in comparison to the Velodyne and V-Moda sets but remains tighter and more controlled than that of the Klipsch’s Image One, another bass-heavy portable headphone. The midrange of the PRO40 gives up some clarity and prominence as a result of the bass emphasis but has a rich, warm tone and still maintains better resolution compared to many other enhanced-bass models. The mids are thick enough that they don’t get crowded out, avoiding the type of heavy midrange veiling that plagues many other headphones of this type.

The top end of the PRO40 is relaxed, but not as rolled off as with the Monoprice 8323 or the classic Sony MDR-V6. The sound is smooth and forgiving, with treble presence about on-par with my V-Moda M-80, but much bigger bass. The Monoprice 8323, for example, sounds quite dull and lacking in dynamics next to the Munitio set and the Denon D1100 isn’t as smooth. The presentation of the PRO40, too, is a little more even than with the Denon set. Whereas the D1100 has a well-layered but intimate presentation, the PRO40 is less forward and a little more versatile. Worth noting also is the high sensitivity of the headphone – the PRO40 is very easy to drive and reaches high volumes as easily with my phone as it does with the HiFiMan HM-901 or a desktop amp.

Value (7.5/10): The Munitio PRO40 is quick to impress with superb build quality and a compliant, comfortable fit. The headphones boast a much better construction than similarly-priced sets such as the Skullcandy Mix Master and Audio-Technica ES10, and back it with a 2-year warranty. The sound loses a bit of refinement to the enhanced bass but is fun and capable all around. Overall, the PRO40 is a good bass-heavy headphone with bulletproof construction, and a great full-size adaptation of Munitio’s in-ear earphones.

post #4182 of 4385

I would still be very interested to hear your thoughts on the KRK line of cans: http://amzn.com/B004ARSMXQ. I've been trying to find an excuse to pick up a pair, but I really have no need. They've gotten spectacular reviews on head-fi. http://www.head-fi.org/t/560605/krk-kns-6400-review-impressive-99-giant-killer

 

Having heard their desktop monitors (they're spectacular, anyone looking for monitors should check them out), I'm pretty curious about these cans.

 

Hope all is well, sir.

post #4183 of 4385
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post
 

I would still be very interested to hear your thoughts on the KRK line of cans: http://amzn.com/B004ARSMXQ. I've been trying to find an excuse to pick up a pair, but I really have no need. They've gotten spectacular reviews on head-fi. http://www.head-fi.org/t/560605/krk-kns-6400-review-impressive-99-giant-killer

 

Having heard their desktop monitors (they're spectacular, anyone looking for monitors should check them out), I'm pretty curious about these cans.

 

Hope all is well, sir.

 

I was on the verge of buying KRK active monitors when I quite serendipitously got my hands on the Emotivas I'm using now. Sadly, no experience with their headphones. Wonder if they were at CES...

post #4184 of 4385
Thread Starter 

Posted the fourth and final part of my CES Headphone Impressions at http://theheadphonelist.com/ces-2014-headphone-coverage-part-4-scosche-meelectronics-german-maestro/ . There's a few portable headphones in there so I guess that makes it more relevant to this thread than the IEM thread.

 

 

Highlights from Part 4:

 

  • The technical details of Scosche headphones elude even their staff but some of the models sound pretty good
  • The MEElectronics Atlas looks good with full-headphone graphics and sounds good with deep bass and a mildly v-shaped signature
  • As it turns out, a Motörhead concert at 110dB is not conducive to headphone testing
  • Nakamichi wins the coveted “Worst in Show” award for the turdtastic NK 600
  • An upcoming Ecko Unltd full-size headphone may just be retro enough to work
  • Razer’s new made-for-music Adaro headphone line is worth a listen
  • GermanMAESTRO impresses with lightweight, yet ultra-durable headphones, especially the full-size GMP 435 S

 

 

Full post, complete with photos, can be found here

post #4185 of 4385

I have to say...the NVX XPT100 simply blows the CAL away.  I did a short first-impression on the XPT100s several weeks ago, and I don't think I accurately portrayed the capabilities of these monitoring headphones - yes, these are indeed monitoring headphones, and damn good ones at that (especially at $80).

 

The XPT100's base IS ever so slightly boosted, but not as much as the CAL's.  Extension-wise, the XPT100 is about equal to the CAL, but the XPT100 not only presents itself with the CAL's depth, but also far better balance and control.

 

The mids on the XPT100 are fuller and clearer than the slightly V-shaped signature of the CAL.

 

I have always had difficulty comparing headphones' treble, but the difference between the XPT100 and CAL are literally night and day.  The XPT100's treble makes it evident that the CAL's has a slight grain,as well as some harshness in the upper midrange / lower treble. Right out of the box the XPT100's treble sounded laid-back to me, but I now believe this to be be because I have never heard headphones this neutral and uncolored (all of my past cans had slightly to moderately V-shaped signatures).  I still prefer to give the XPT100's a small treble boost with AIMP3's 18-band EQ (+0.6 DB @ 5.6k and +1.5 DB @ 8k).

 

Most cans make you choose between comfort and isolation (due to clamping force), but with the XPT100s, you get both, and it's not the "jack of all trades" kind of both.  The isolation is extremely good, especially compared with the CALs.  I am sure you can get headphones with better isolation out there, but I doubt they are this comfortable.  Comfort-wise, the CAL is amazing, but these are better.  They are literally like wearing pillows.  My only complaint would be that after several hours of wearing them continuously, the earpads get ever-so-slightly damp....but I rarely wear them for several hours continuously.

 

As for portability....lol.  Don't expect to take these monsters anywhere.  They may be light, but you WILL look like Princess Leia while wearing them.  These are definitely for at-home use, or taking on vacations (thanks to their protective storage case).  They also definitely beat the CAL in durability, although there are plenty of cans out there that are more solidly constructed.


Edited by Darknecron - 2/1/14 at 10:41pm
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