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Shootout: 113 Portable Headphones Reviewed (Alpha Design Labs ADL H118 added 07/15/14) - Page 241

post #3601 of 4417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Impulse View Post

Because glossy plastic is totally stylish? Or everyone wearing them makes it stylish?

 

The M-80 stand out less in person than in pictures IMO, I wasn't crazy about their look until I saw them first hand.


Plus, they are like the only headphone ever to meet mil spec for durability, that impressed the hell out of me

post #3602 of 4417

How does the Monoprice 8323 Stand up against the Beyerdynamic dt-235? Thanks

post #3603 of 4417
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by parnold View Post

How does the Monoprice 8323 Stand up against the Beyerdynamic dt-235? Thanks

 

I think the Beyerdynamics are slightly better but also different in sound signature - more balanced and neutral with better treble presence and extension versus the bassier, warmer, darker 8323.

post #3604 of 4417

What would you consider something of the next step beyond the CAL!

Higher up the old Denon line?

Looking at the data sheets over at innerfidelity, the V-Moda M-80 doesn't seem to have an appreciable leg-up sound-wise.

Thoughts?

post #3605 of 4417
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post

What would you consider something of the next step beyond the CAL!

Higher up the old Denon line?

Looking at the data sheets over at innerfidelity, the V-Moda M-80 doesn't seem to have an appreciable leg-up sound-wise.

Thoughts?


I haven't heard very high up the Denon line (stopped with D2000), or any other line for that matter. I think you would have to go beyond portable for a major upgrade from the CAL!. 

post #3606 of 4417
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post

What would you consider something of the next step beyond the CAL!

Higher up the old Denon line?

Looking at the data sheets over at innerfidelity, the V-Moda M-80 doesn't seem to have an appreciable leg-up sound-wise.

Thoughts?


I haven't heard very high up the Denon line (stopped with D2000), or any other line for that matter. I think you would have to go beyond portable for a major upgrade from the CAL!. 


I kind of figured. I was hoping you had, you have created something of a scale, and your reviews fall into that scale, which is so convenient, unfortunately, other reviews do not. Did you find the 2000 to be a big improvement over the CAL?

post #3607 of 4417
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post


I kind of figured. I was hoping you had, you have created something of a scale, and your reviews fall into that scale, which is so convenient, unfortunately, other reviews do not. Did you find the 2000 to be a big improvement over the CAL?


No, the D2000 for me was roughly on-par with the M-80.

post #3608 of 4417
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by scootsit View Post


I kind of figured. I was hoping you had, you have created something of a scale, and your reviews fall into that scale, which is so convenient, unfortunately, other reviews do not. Did you find the 2000 to be a big improvement over the CAL?


No, the D2000 for me was roughly on-par with the M-80.


Gotcha, I'll take a look at the Beyer DTs and a few other things, maybe further up the Denon line, though the new Denon line-up is getting a pretty mixed response.

post #3609 of 4417
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

Really depends on what you are looking to see improved over the HTF600. The biggest difference would be isolation.

 

Sound-wise the M50 is a little clearer, the bass is deeper, and the treble is a bit less grainy but don't expect huge gains in areas like impact and soundstaging - the HTF600 is already punchy and spacious and has the advantage of being semi-open in design.


Thanks. Hmmm....doesn't seem worth the money, I guess, since it's €40 vs. €170. Joker, do you know a headphone which will be a worthwile upgrade to the HTF600? I mean, with similar sound signature. for around the same price as the M50.

post #3610 of 4417
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerA View Post


Thanks. Hmmm....doesn't seem worth the money, I guess, since it's €40 vs. €170. Joker, do you know a headphone which will be a worthwile upgrade to the HTF600? I mean, with similar sound signature. for around the same price as the M50.


Nope redface.gif

post #3611 of 4417
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post


Nope redface.gif

NO?! :(

 

What do you think of the CAL! and ZX700 compared to the HTF600. I guess you will always need to make a trade off and not supposed to expect a 100% improvement in all aspects.

post #3612 of 4417

ljokerl, would you consider comparing the Audio Technica WS-55's anytime soon? I have been using the Sony MDR-ZX700s for a while now, and my only complaint is that the earpads are too thin so the driver grilles actually put excess pressure on my ears and I was wondering if the WS55's are a good alternative.

post #3613 of 4417
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

I think the Beyerdynamics are slightly better but also different in sound signature - more balanced and neutral with better treble presence and extension versus the bassier, warmer, darker 8323.

Haven't heard the 8323's but ordered the DT235's based on your description of the sound, pretty much exactly what I expected, very cohesive sound. I especially like the bass, which takes a slight back seat compared to bass heavy phones, but without lacking much in depth or impact. As you stated, it's rather addicting, and quite a bargain for 47 dollars.  Put on some music, and you'll soon forget they are <50$ cans.

post #3614 of 4417
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerA View Post

NO?! :(

 

What do you think of the CAL! and ZX700 compared to the HTF600. I guess you will always need to make a trade off and not supposed to expect a 100% improvement in all aspects.

 

Both of those are less of an improvement than the M50 IMO... The ZX700 especially sounds nothing like the HTF600 with its dry, somewhat mid-centric sound. The CAL! is better but still not what I would consider an upgrade. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mclover View Post

ljokerl, would you consider comparing the Audio Technica WS-55's anytime soon? I have been using the Sony MDR-ZX700s for a while now, and my only complaint is that the earpads are too thin so the driver grilles actually put excess pressure on my ears and I was wondering if the WS55's are a good alternative.

 

No plans to review those at this time.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by the search never ends View Post

Haven't heard the 8323's but ordered the DT235's based on your description of the sound, pretty much exactly what I expected, very cohesive sound. I especially like the bass, which takes a slight back seat compared to bass heavy phones, but without lacking much in depth or impact. As you stated, it's rather addicting, and quite a bargain for 47 dollars.  Put on some music, and you'll soon forget they are <50$ cans.

 

Amazing that these are pretty much identical to the old DT231, an ~11 year old design. 

post #3615 of 4417
Thread Starter 

Added the B&W P3

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljokerl View Post

 

(A21) Bowers & Wilkins P3: the smaller and even more portable sibling of B&W’s P5 headphone
 

1000

 

Build Quality (8.5/10): Whereas the higher-end P5 is swathed in luxurious leather, the smaller and lighter P3 is more utilitarian with its patterned cloth padding and rubberized plastics. Unlike the P5, the P3 is collapsible, though the addition of hinges does means that the detachable cable is no longer single-sided. Construction quality remains impressive– all of the moving parts are metal and there is no play in the structure. The 2.5mm cable connectors are hidden underneath the magnetically-attached pads and the zigzagging cable route acts as a strain relief of sorts. Both a stereo cable and mic/3-button remote cord are included. The thickness of the cable is a little disappointing next to similarly-priced V-Moda and Sennheiser headphones but the overall construction can give any other small portable headphone out there a run for its money.

Comfort (9.5/10): The P3 is a small supraaural headphone. The cloth pads fit flat against the ear and breathe well, though the cushioning is not quite as soft and supple as the leather padding of the P5 and the headband is not nearly as plush. To compensate, B&W made the fit looser, which allowed the P3 to remain comfortable for prolonger wear but somewhat compromised the secure fit and isolation compared to the P5.

Isolation (7.5/10): Isolation is slightly lacking – the larger, softer, better-sealing pads of the P5 provided good isolation but the noise-blocking abilities of the P3 are average at best. There is also a bit of leakage of sound into the environment.

Sound (7.5/10): By now it is clear that Bowers & Wilkins has established a house sound for their headphones and earphones—the B&W products I have heard are generally warm and smooth, with enhanced bass and relaxed treble. The P3 follows this without misstep. There is not much emphasis in the sub-bass region responsible for depth and rumble but mid- and upper bass are boosted heavily, providing plentiful impact. Bass control is surprisingly good – despite its weight, the punch is tight and accurate. Comparing the P3 to the Klipsch Image One makes the bass of the Klipsch unit sound a lot more bloated and intrusive.

Unfortunately the upper bass of the P3 comes across a bit too strong much of the time, crowding out the midrange and reducing the overall clarity of the headphones. There is also a slight lack of dynamics apparent with many good recordings. The relative tightness of the bass does help, but the P3 never quite manages to deliver the same sort of effortlessly clean sound that the V-Moda M-80 or Sennheiser HD25-1 can put out.

The midrange is detailed, pleasantly warm, and has a thick, fleshed-out note. It is prominent enough to ensure that vocals and instruments are heard clearly and keeps veiling to a minimum. Unfortunately, the mids lose some of their potential to the upper bass emphasis and mediocre dynamics. Clarity is only average for headphones of this caliber – clearly not up the standard set by the V-Moda or Sennheiser offerings.

The treble is a touch laid-back on the whole and rolls off gently at the top. This means that the P3 does not introduce any harshness and even acts to cut down on sibilance already present on recordings. It is not a revealing headphone, but then it was clearly tuned for an inoffensive, consumer-friendly sound. Those who like their treble bright, crisp, and sparkly will be disappointed – the P3 lacks the top-end energy of sets such as the AKG Q460 and Sennheiser HD25-1.

The presentation of the P3 is a bit laid-back. The headphone isn’t dynamic enough to portray distance or space very well and the lack of crispness means that the imaging is never very precise. Instruments are reasonably well-separated but the sonic image of the P3 is a little flat and the presentation lacks the openness more dynamic sets such as the V-Moda M-80 are capable of conveying, sounding a little closed-in and confined.

Value (7/10). (MSRP: $199.99; Street Price: $199) The Bowers & Wilkins P3 is a luxury gadget for the iPhone crowd, offering a combination of style, comfort, and portability, all solidly-constructed and draped in B&W pedigree. Those who purchase it for fidelity, however, may be left disappointed—the P3 imposes its own peculiar coloration on music to a greater extent than the higher-end P5 model does. It is far from transparent to source, instead pursuing a warm and smooth sound signature tuned to appeal to the general consumer. That said, consumers who are willing to pay a premium for the combination of aesthetics and functionality will find the P3 to be a non-fatiguing, punchy headphone that works well in portable applications.

Manufacturer Specs:
Frequency Response: 10-20,000 Hz
Impedance: 34 Ω
Sensitivity: 111 dB SPL/1mW
Cord: 3.94ft (1.2m), detachable; Straight plug
Space-Saving Mechanism: Collapsible

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