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Sennheiser HD800 Certificate for Frequency Response Arrived - Page 33

post #481 of 582

maybe, and being skeptical is a bad habit that dies quite hard after all at every age :P

 

and actually there's no trace of hard sibilance or brightness on this hd800, and thats a fact.


Edited by Blasyrkh - 3/14/14 at 7:06am
post #482 of 582


Ordered from A2A (Australia) on the 18th delivered/registered 19th certificate in my email 20th

All the usual peaks and valleys the 3k to 6k is quite mild on this one

Sound is spectacular very different from any headphone I have ever heard

Judging by the serial number I would guess it has spent about a year in the storeroom at A2A

post #483 of 582

Here is another 28 one just received. Looks pretty good around 6kHz

 

post #484 of 582
Nice graph! A bit flatter than mine even. Dang! wink.gif
post #485 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike F View Post

Nice graph! A bit flatter than mine even. Dang! wink.gif

 

:) I am sure the differences between yours and mine are unlikely to be audible. But this is very interesting for me. I play the piano and often practice using a Yamaha Clavinova...one of the more recent high-end models. Having a pair of headphones that correctly captures the timbre of the piano is vital for me. Of course this is highly complex as you have to consider the accuracy of the samples in the first place which may have a bias in their own right. An example of a headphone that gets it completely and totally wrong (for me) is the Grado PS 1000...the treble is so peaky and all I can hear is the click sound of the mechanics of the keys (aspects such as the piano hammers are sampled as part of the complete reproduction of a digital piano). It was so distracting I couldn't bear it. The HD800 I listened to about 2 years ago (I don't have the serial) was better than the Grado but still over emphasised the treble and it didn't sound right. This new HD800 sounds very different (I know its a long time ago, but I know exactly which sound I am listening for) because the peakiness that was distracting me is almost completely gone. However the Audeze LCD-3 still wins the day for use with my piano. However I bought the HD800s to use along side my LCD-3 for my Burson Soloist set-up as I have found certain types of music can sound congested with the LCD-3 but open up beautifully with the HD800s. I don't think "one headphone fits all". With loud speakers we have to choose a favourite because we don't normally have the living room space to have several sets for different music genres. But with headphones, if one can afford it, we gain the luxury of choosing the sound/equipment to fit the music. This is why headphones can be a bank breaker if you are not careful!

post #486 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonstatt View Post
 

 

:) I am sure the differences between yours and mine are unlikely to be audible. But this is very interesting for me. I play the piano and often practice using a Yamaha Clavinova...one of the more recent high-end models. Having a pair of headphones that correctly captures the timbre of the piano is vital for me. Of course this is highly complex as you have to consider the accuracy of the samples in the first place which may have a bias in their own right. An example of a headphone that gets it completely and totally wrong (for me) is the Grado PS 1000...the treble is so peaky and all I can hear is the click sound of the mechanics of the keys (aspects such as the piano hammers are sampled as part of the complete reproduction of a digital piano). It was so distracting I couldn't bear it. The HD800 I listened to about 2 years ago (I don't have the serial) was better than the Grado but still over emphasised the treble and it didn't sound right. This new HD800 sounds very different (I know its a long time ago, but I know exactly which sound I am listening for) because the peakiness that was distracting me is almost completely gone. However the Audeze LCD-3 still wins the day for use with my piano. However I bought the HD800s to use along side my LCD-3 for my Burson Soloist set-up as I have found certain types of music can sound congested with the LCD-3 but open up beautifully with the HD800s. I don't think "one headphone fits all". With loud speakers we have to choose a favourite because we don't normally have the living room space to have several sets for different music genres. But with headphones, if one can afford it, we gain the luxury of choosing the sound/equipment to fit the music. This is why headphones can be a bank breaker if you are not careful!

I totally agree with you that no "one headphone fits all".  Like you I use HD-800 and LCD-X for different types of music.  With these two CANs they cover all kinds of music to my taste.

post #487 of 582

I got mine today:

 

post #488 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonstatt View Post
 

Here is another 28 one just received. Looks pretty good around 6kHz

 

What does a bad one around 6kHz look like?

post #489 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by roguegeek View Post
 

What does a bad one around 6kHz look like?

Take a look at my graph 24610 post #482 there is a bump at 6khz if that bump extended beyond the 5db mark that would be bad

post #490 of 582

It seems to me that the graphs are definitely a lot smoother (no 6kHz peak) generally than the early ones, but with more bass. I wonder if Tyll has heard a recent pair. His only previous criticism was a hot treble. I certainly don't hear that on mine (or see it in the graph). And I love the bass on mine. Just fantastic!

post #491 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike F View Post
 

It seems to me that the graphs are definitely a lot smoother (no 6kHz peak) generally than the early ones, but with more bass. I wonder if Tyll has heard a recent pair. His only previous criticism was a hot treble. I certainly don't hear that on mine (or see it in the graph). And I love the bass on mine. Just fantastic!

 

If you look at Audeze LCD-2 and LCD-3 graphs there is a much bigger variance from unit to unit than these graphs are showing. But once you get over about 2kHz, the measurement technique becomes more critical and the slightest variance in that technique (mic, headphone positioning, sound output levels etc), can provide challenges in graph consistency even if you measured the same headphones more than once. However the Audeze graphs, although smoothed, are not as smoothed as the Senns are. Because of this high level of smoothing it does indeed appear that there is a deliberate change around 6kHz in manufacturing. Below 2kHz, the graphs are very consistent from unit to unit on almost any headphone I look at and so it does also suggest that the graphs are indicating a change in bass response as well. Unfortunately the graphs only go down to 100Hz, and as the graph suggests an upward tick towards 100Hz, it would be interesting to know what it does below that!

 

Using my HD800 with a soloist, all I can say is that the bass does not sound overblown, or light but my auditory senses suggest "clinically accurate". This could be interpreted negatively when the word clinical is used as to suggest cold and unexciting. I didn't mean it that way at all...just that it feels I am hearing everything I am meant to hear at the right level. In contrast the LCD-3 I also have still sounds fuller and more rounded at those low frequencies, if not quite as detailed. I would NOT say the LCD-3 was slower (and I would certainly hope not for a planar headphone!), but the LCD-3 can give the sensation of a fuller bass at the expense of a very slight level of detail.

 

Also listening to a drum track from an SACD of Hiromi, I was fascinated about the different portrayal of the drum set with both the HD800 and LCD-3. The HD800 presented the drum kit in a larger studio some meters away from me. The LCD-3 sounded like I was the drum player and arguably seemed to present the timbre of the drums slightly better. But that slight nod to the LCD-3 also becomes its negative when dealing with orchestral music where it can then sound congested like all the instruments are on top of each other. Fascinating differences between headphones...the timbre aspect is likely to do with the darker frequency response of the LCD-3...but the positioning of instruments within the soundspace is the most intriguing. It suggests that you would choose the LCD-3 for a more intimate moment with an artist and a small number of instruments...but the HD800 when dealing with large bands, orchestras etc. 

post #492 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonstatt View Post
 

 

If you look at Audeze LCD-2 and LCD-3 graphs there is a much bigger variance from unit to unit than these graphs are showing. But once you get over about 2kHz, the measurement technique becomes more critical and the slightest variance in that technique (mic, headphone positioning, sound output levels etc), can provide challenges in graph consistency even if you measured the same headphones more than once. However the Audeze graphs, although smoothed, are not as smoothed as the Senns are. Because of this high level of smoothing it does indeed appear that there is a deliberate change around 6kHz in manufacturing. Below 2kHz, the graphs are very consistent from unit to unit on almost any headphone I look at and so it does also suggest that the graphs are indicating a change in bass response as well. Unfortunately the graphs only go down to 100Hz, and as the graph suggests an upward tick towards 100Hz, it would be interesting to know what it does below that!

 

Using my HD800 with a soloist, all I can say is that the bass does not sound overblown, or light but my auditory senses suggest "clinically accurate". This could be interpreted negatively when the word clinical is used as to suggest cold and unexciting. I didn't mean it that way at all...just that it feels I am hearing everything I am meant to hear at the right level. In contrast the LCD-3 I also have still sounds fuller and more rounded at those low frequencies, if not quite as detailed. I would NOT say the LCD-3 was slower (and I would certainly hope not for a planar headphone!), but the LCD-3 can give the sensation of a fuller bass at the expense of a very slight level of detail.

 

Also listening to a drum track from an SACD of Hiromi, I was fascinated about the different portrayal of the drum set with both the HD800 and LCD-3. The HD800 presented the drum kit in a larger studio some meters away from me. The LCD-3 sounded like I was the drum player and arguably seemed to present the timbre of the drums slightly better. But that slight nod to the LCD-3 also becomes its negative when dealing with orchestral music where it can then sound congested like all the instruments are on top of each other. Fascinating differences between headphones...the timbre aspect is likely to do with the darker frequency response of the LCD-3...but the positioning of instruments within the soundspace is the most intriguing. It suggests that you would choose the LCD-3 for a more intimate moment with an artist and a small number of instruments...but the HD800 when dealing with large bands, orchestras etc. 

 

Thanks, very interesting. I'd certainly like to know what happens below 100Hz as well! They sound very extended to my ears - noticeably more extended than the 650's but at the same time subjectively slightly less in the mid bass. The bass on the 800's is definitely superior though.

post #493 of 582

Thought I may chime in with my chart (s).  My original newly purchased HD-800 approx. 1 month ago had this frequency chart produced.

 

Needless to say I could hear what you see.  Super bright indeed.  Notice that its a later serial number.

 

Look at that 6k peak.

 

 

 


 The 6k peak was very noticeable, almost unlistenable to some degree.  And I'm a Grado fan .... lol.

 

 Took them back a week later and picked up an earlier serial number ..... these are what I was expecting.  The hp itself is more neutral IMO and it shows. 

 

 

 

I guess this proves that Sennheiser has not fixed the 6k spike issue in later releases.  And in many ways purchasing a new HD-800  is a bit of a crapshoot unfortunately.

 

Let me also say that I do not possess "golden ears" or "bat like" senses , trust me though that the differences between these two serial numbers was like night and day.

post #494 of 582
I thought 28xxx don't have 6kHz issue. This is the first 28xxx I'm seeing with the peak issue.
post #495 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mortalcoil View Post
 

 

 

I guess this proves that Sennheiser has not fixed the 6k spike issue in later releases.  And in many ways purchasing a new HD-800  is a bit of a crapshoot unfortunately.

 

Let me also say that I do not possess "golden ears" or "bat like" senses , trust me though that the differences between these two serial numbers was like night and day.

 

I trust you, you hear exactly what i heard between my new hd800 and one of the first models i bought years ago.

 

here, they are trying to let me think i am crazy and i'm seeing things. and crazy or not i'm sure it is like this, especially for sibilance

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