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Sennheiser HD800 Certificate for Frequency Response Arrived - Page 29

post #421 of 717

My 6K peak is fairly high but a relatively low 4K peak compared to earlier serial numbers.  I'm not finding anything objectionable in regards to my HD800's treble so I'll hold onto it.  

 

 

post #422 of 717

I wonder what the comparable results would be with other headphones in the same conditions with the same graph resolutions? High and top-end headphones such as HD650, HD700, LCD-2/3 even the Orpheus if it were possible to do. You may praise all HD800s for their awesome and unmatched neutrality regardless of the minute deviations between individual sets.

 

The anomalies inherent and unavoidable in the physical world that produce the % of difference between HD800s we see here is probably so tightly within a tolerance there's no effective chance of being able to pick this up audibly within reason.

 

We’re all very privileged to live in a time when these headphones and the supporting technology to drive them with high quality sources at home exist. I’m more for enhancements in clarity than the retro sweets nostalgia of the click and poppy mediums of the 70s and 80s so I’m glad my life can pass through this awesome period in fidelity. Thanks to Sennheiser's laudable efforts (and commerical pressure from their competition to be the best) the returns you can gain in purity now are so diminished that we’re as reasonable close to perfection as we’ll likely ever get to, or notice. A 1001 horse power car is technically inferior to a 1002 HP updated version of that car, but would you notice?


Edited by Danno81 - 1/29/14 at 9:51am
post #423 of 717

I just received my HD 800 headphones today.  Can someone please advise where I request the frequency response plot for my headphones?


Edited by ghibliss - 1/31/14 at 7:43am
post #424 of 717
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghibliss View Post

I just received my HD 800 headphones today.  Can someone please advise where I request the frequency response plot for my headphones?

http://en-de.sennheiser.com/service-support-services-register-your-product

Enter HD800, fill out the form, and make sure to check the box on the bottom that says "Frequency response certificate". The FR chart should arrive in your email in a couple of days or so.

smily_headphones1.gif
post #425 of 717

Very late in the game but here's mine:

 

 

post #426 of 717

Here is mine:

 

post #427 of 717
Quote:
Originally Posted by gevorg View Post


http://en-de.sennheiser.com/service-support-services-register-your-product

Enter HD800, fill out the form, and make sure to check the box on the bottom that says "Frequency response certificate". The FR chart should arrive in your email in a couple of days or so.

smily_headphones1.gif

thanks so much Gevorg, I just filled this out now now sure how long it will take them to mail me the FR chart.  

so are my hd800 now registered for warranty purposes on their german site? or  would I still need to fill out the registration on the US site as well?

post #428 of 717

I received my frequency response plot today from Sennheiser after submitting it to them on Friday.  (4 days including the weekend).


Edited by ghibliss - 2/4/14 at 6:22pm
post #429 of 717

So many people received their FR graphs in a few days.. I had to wait a whole 2 weeks for mine :blink: 

post #430 of 717
Quote:
Originally Posted by eantala View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by gevorg View Post

http://en-de.sennheiser.com/service-support-services-register-your-product


Enter HD800, fill out the form, and make sure to check the box on the bottom that says "Frequency response certificate". The FR chart should arrive in your email in a couple of days or so.

smily_headphones1.gif
thanks so much Gevorg, I just filled this out now now sure how long it will take them to mail me the FR chart.  
so are my hd800 now registered for warranty purposes on their german site? or  would I still need to fill out the registration on the US site as well?

If you bought it in US and live in US, then you should register and get service from Sennheiser USA, but it wouldn't hurt to have registration on a German site too.
post #431 of 717
Quote:
Originally Posted by WNBC View Post
 

My 6K peak is fairly high but a relatively low 4K peak compared to earlier serial numbers.  I'm not finding anything objectionable in regards to my HD800's treble so I'll hold onto it.  

 

 

HI WNBC I was just emailed my FR graph (guess they've gotten smart and trying to save onpostage) but I swear your headphone and mine could be be long lost twins!  

 

All experts, what do you make of the below what do you make of the below, in your experience is this a good example of the hd800? 

 

post #432 of 717

Very close indeed.  If we lived in the same state we could do a Bottlehead & Taboo CSP amp comparison.  These are very good amps for the HD800.

 

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Quote:

Originally Posted by eantala View Post
 

HI WNBC I was just emailed my FR graph (guess they've gotten smart and trying to save onpostage) but I swear your headphone and mine could be be long lost twins!  

 

All experts, what do you make of the below what do you make of the below, in your experience is this a good example of the hd800? 

 

 

 

post #433 of 717
cant see pics....
post #434 of 717

I think that many individuals here feel that the frequency response graph should appear ruler flat which is not the case!  Headphones adhere to a standard which is different as they are pre-equalized to account for the ear canals hearing response.  Apparently your ears response is different when placing a driver in close proximity to your ear as opposed to listening to speakers placed at a distance from you.  As you can see the high frequency  range is attenuated gradually from 1 Khz to around 5-6 KHz and then rolls off in the target FR and appears flat when looking at the perceived response curve. To get a better understanding of this look at the etymotic research website at  http://www.etymotic.com/ephp/er4.html   and read the information on this which will show you why the response curve appears as it does.  If you apply the filter equalization to the fr you will see an extremely flat response which is what is really important in the end.

 

 

 

Accurate Earphone Reproduction

For earphones to have 100% accuracy, a recording of a live performance must produce exactly the same sound at the eardrum as the original performance. To achieve this, the acoustic properties of the ear must be factored in. The acoustic resonance and horn effects of the ear change a flat audio signal entering the open ear into sound with a (2700 Hz) high-frequency boost, which is the same response heard at the eardrum in a typical ear.

 

 

er4pt_compliance_graph_480g.png

 

 

 

er4pt_graph_ts.png 

post #435 of 717
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghibliss View Post
 

I think that many individuals here feel that the frequency response graph should appear ruler flat which is not the case!  Headphones adhere to a standard which is different as they are pre-equalized to account for the ear canals hearing response.  Apparently your ears response is different when placing a driver in close proximity to your ear as opposed to listening to speakers placed at a distance from you.  As you can see the high frequency  range is attenuated gradually from 1 Khz to around 5-6 KHz and then rolls off in the target FR and appears flat when looking at the perceived response curve. To get a better understanding of this look at the etymotic research website at  http://www.etymotic.com/ephp/er4.html   and read the information on this which will show you why the response curve appears as it does.  If you apply the filter equalization to the fr you will see an extremely flat response which is what is really important in the end.

 

 

 

Accurate Earphone Reproduction

For earphones to have 100% accuracy, a recording of a live performance must produce exactly the same sound at the eardrum as the original performance. To achieve this, the acoustic properties of the ear must be factored in. The acoustic resonance and horn effects of the ear change a flat audio signal entering the open ear into sound with a (2700 Hz) high-frequency boost, which is the same response heard at the eardrum in a typical ear.

 

 

er4pt_compliance_graph_480g.png

 

 

 

er4pt_graph_ts.png 

very imformative, that gives good insight.

You are wise beyond your number of posts :D

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