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Sennheiser HD800 Certificate for Frequency Response Arrived - Page 26

post #376 of 607

Thanks.

post #377 of 607

 

 

Not as flat as I hoped, but certainly resembles what I hear....:P

post #378 of 607


Never previously got around to posting mine. Like many of the other very low sn's, mine have a spread of <3db across the spectrum and a gradual dip centered on 3k (rather than a spike a 6k). Simply love them.
post #379 of 607
Mm, I just got a chance to listen to some HD800's with SN in the 4k range, they sound exactly like mine.
I've got to agree with those who say the graph is pretty much useless...
post #380 of 607
Can anyone explain why nearly all charts have a lower level between 230 and 280 Hz?

Edited by Hubert481 - 8/13/13 at 4:28am
post #381 of 607
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hubert481 View Post

Can anyone explain why nearly all charts have a lower level between 230 and 280 Hz?

While I'm not 100% this would be the case, but it appears this is the hardest part to damp on the HD-800 because of the rising impedance around that point.

 

EDIT: Note the very high impedance around that point.


Edited by brunk - 8/23/13 at 4:43am
post #382 of 607

Love the HD800 graphs. Definitely my favorite dynamic headphone still.

post #383 of 607

Hi 

 

Just got my HD-800 2 weeks ago loving it. Like to share my experience a bit. After knowing about the 6K hump was wondering how can I get one without it. Ask the sells person maybe. Is it even audible I thought. Can't know until I register the thing right that's what I thought.

 

So I went in a headphone shop and ask for a pair to try they gave me a pair with a number in the 19K range. I listen for a moment and notice some noise from the jack. I also notice they had another pair so I ask if I can try the other pair. They said yes S/N 22550 and straight away the absent of the 6K hump was very obvious and the rest is history. hahaha 

 

Chris

post #384 of 607

Quote:

Originally Posted by brunk View Post

 

 

Is it not the case the electrical impedance here at 100Hz is due to that frequency being the mechanical resonant frequency of the moving mass and often louder as the cone 'flaps' at that point due to there being the maximum back EMF and most difficult area for the amplifier to control?

post #385 of 607


Here are my TWO charts.  I wanted to ascertain that the chart Sennheiser sent me wasn't a random and arbitrary graph that they manufacture just to satisfy HD800 owners' curiosity.  So, I registered my HD800 with both the Sennheiser Asia and Sennheiser USA websites and requested from both a separate certificate.

[From the Sennheiser USA website]




 

[From the Sennheiser Asia website]

post #386 of 607
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hubert481 View Post

Can anyone explain why nearly all charts have a lower level between 230 and 280 Hz?

 

If you look at the scale the dip is very shallow and likely inaudible. Secondly it helps with clarity, as the 240Hz range is known as the "mud range" that muddies up the sound.

post #387 of 607

....only if there is "mud" in the recording. If there happens to be musical information (such as harmonics and overtones) in that range, it goes bye-bye.

post #388 of 607

All those measurements were taken at the factory when the headphones were brand new right? So what happens to that flat curve when the headphones breaks-in and when you put them in your hi-fi chain?  It's good to know that the HD800 are consistent, it denotes a good attention to quality control, but when debating a little peak here and a little dip there, is it really relevant if you consider real life listening conditions?


Edited by AnsBjork - 9/26/13 at 8:09am
post #389 of 607
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnsBjork View Post
 

All those measurements were taken at the factory when the headphones were brand new right? So what happens to that flat curve when the headphones breaks-in and when you put them in your hi-fi chain?  It's good to know that the HD800 are consistent, it denotes a good attention to quality control, but when debating a little peak here and a little dip there, is it really relevant if you consider real life listening conditions?

 

That's the purpose of the HD-800's diffuse field graph.

post #390 of 607

Brunk, by real conditions I mean considering that the sound will change with break-in. Is the diffuse field graph made in factory accounting for this? Since everyone agree that the HD800 sound not to good before break-in (at least 100h before final sound sets in) are we all talking abouth graphs of bad sounding headphones? :)

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