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Sennheiser HD800 Certificate for Frequency Response Arrived - Page 17

post #241 of 562

Out of the FRs posted so far, my graph seems to dip to a lower dBspi then anyone elses (at 3kHz), as well as equal highest at 100Hz - coloured much? tongue_smile.gif

But seriously, I doubt I would be able to tell my HD800s from anyone elses.

 

I am however, loving my graph under 2kHz beyersmile.png

 

HD800 silver. Serial no.:11986. Loudness diffuse field - Frequency response.

 

HD800 Freq.png

One can always dream... rolleyes.gif


Edited by SekRF - 10/31/11 at 6:50pm
post #242 of 562
i didn't know the hd800 were diffused field. i should of asked about them more. no wonder they reminded me more of the 240DF's then anything else when i did a brief audition with them.
post #243 of 562

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RexAeterna View Post

i didn't know the hd800 were diffused field...

 

I'm not very knowlagable on this topic, but isn't 'Diffuse field' refering to the recording method in this context?

I took it as meaning: "Recored frequency response of the driver with the surrounding earpiece around it - Diffuse field" - as opposed to the FR of the driver alone.

 

For that matter, is there such thing as a 'Free field' headphone anyway? (genuine question, I've managed to confuse myself...) confused.gif

post #244 of 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by SekRF View Post

 

 

I'm not very knowlagable on this topic, but isn't 'Diffuse field' refering to the recording method in this context?

I took it as meaning: "Recored frequency response of the driver with the surrounding earpiece around it - Diffuse field" - as opposed to the FR of the driver alone.

 

For that matter, is there such thing as a 'Free field' headphone anyway? (genuine question, I've managed to confuse myself...) confused.gif


Nope, it's also the technique used to voice the FR of the driver.  Etymotics does the same.  Whether diffuse-field is the last word on the matter is another debate altogether.  Have a read.

 

http://www.etymotic.com/technology/hwmra.html

 


Edited by Anaxilus - 10/30/11 at 9:18pm
post #245 of 562

somebody is so worried about the exactiness of tre FR that may shall consider the geographical location and it`s relative planetar magnetic field,as the radio interference around itself..anyway he wont hear any difference,at least non without a 3 billion dollars cyber-ear phrotesys ....

post #246 of 562

Mine, serial number under 14000.

 

img084.jpg

post #247 of 562

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by InnerSpace View Post


...The HD800's legendary spike is up around 6k...

 

 

Originally Posted by Anaxilus View Post

 

...HD800s using this mod w/ the supposed 6k nastiness...

 

 

 Originally Posted by Currawong View Post

...have a slightly hotter treble in the 6k range...

 

 

 Originally Posted by Danz03 View Post

...one needs to cut the HD800's 6k spike...

 

 

 Originally Posted by Skylab View Post

...That is a very noticeable peak of almost 8db at 6 kHz...

 

 

 

So I overlayed my FR onto DVDRey's and got an interesting result.Comparison.png

Coincidence? Or has Sennheiser actually been listening? (no pun intended... tongue_smile.gif )

Now I'm curious to see if this will become then norm. Does anyone have a +14000 graph?

 


(Edit...)

 

Okay, here's one from an earlier batch for further comparison.Comparison2.png


Edited by SekRF - 12/26/11 at 12:35pm
post #248 of 562

Good, but you haven't overlayed with the first batch, where bass were much lesser?

post #249 of 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by c540 View Post

I am curious if the frequency fluctuation is engineered into the design (as in: "later vs earlier" versions) or if this is just the result of normal manufacturing variation.

 

 

Won't the actual peaks in the output depend a lot on the source?  i.e., if the source is distorting the peaks in the 6 kHz -- 9 kHz range (or wherever) this seems it would have a much larger effect than variation in HD800 manufacturing.

 

 

post #250 of 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Durandal View Post

 

 

Won't the actual peaks in the output depend a lot on the source?  i.e., if the source is distorting the peaks in the 6 kHz -- 9 kHz range (or wherever) this seems it would have a much larger effect than variation in HD800 manufacturing.


Are you suggesting Senn is using an inferior, inconsistent source for there measurements and engineering?  I'm kind of lost wrt your point or is that a general question?  To my (marketing) knowledge there are 9 engineers wearing Sennheiser lab coats wearing white rabbit skinned gloves named Heinrich, Jurgen, Deiter, Karl, Mattias, Klaus, Mustafa, Hans and Franz that verify the sanctity of this process.   

 

post #251 of 562
check out my graph.

DAVESIMAGINARYHD800-1.png

you guys jelly?
post #252 of 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by SekRF View Post



I'm not very knowlagable on this topic, but isn't 'Diffuse field' refering to the recording method in this context?
I took it as meaning: "Recored frequency response of the driver with the surrounding earpiece around it - Diffuse field" - as opposed to the FR of the driver alone.

For that matter, is there such thing as a 'Free field' headphone anyway? (genuine question, I've managed to confuse myself...) confused.gif


how the headphone is measured as mentioned. sennheiser and other companies do their own type of diffused-field. they didn't fellow any standards like the beyer dt48S and 240DF did. the dt48 i believe fellowed what they called Negra standard(i will say i am not sure on the name but something around there), while the 240DF fellowed the IRT strict standards for German radio broadcasting and recording for live-field monitoring and mixing.

only dynamics i know that were free-field equalized were the AKG 240 sextetts, AKG K1000 and at one point the beyer dt48 was free-field till around late 70's to early 80's where studios around the world decided to switch to diffused-field. most of current AKG top models like the Kx00/1/2 series are all diffused-field still but not the same way the original AKG 240DF was. all of Stax and most electrostatics are still free-field equalized but by their own standards since Stax modified their own way of free-field equalizing. they only made 1 Stax model that used a special Diffused-field box if i remember correctly.

Planer magnetics i have no idea how they were measured to be honest. planers are the only thing i do not know about on their background when it comes to how they were measured.
post #253 of 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaxilus View Post



Nope, it's also the technique used to voice the FR of the driver.  Etymotics does the same.  Whether diffuse-field is the last word on the matter is another debate altogether.  Have a read.

http://www.etymotic.com/technology/hwmra.html

that's actually a smart way of doing it since they are right that loudspeakers tend to have what they call ''modern highs'' and most music must accentuate those ranges to make up for the modern highs of todays equipment. that's why people find old flat frequency speakers too bright or older diffused-field headphones like the 240DF bright cause when played with modern recordings they tend to sound very bright due to the boost in the recordings frequency range. we wouldn't have these issues though if it wasn't for the whole loudness war and so forth going on. songs with proper recording techniques and great dynamic range will sound amazing and not bright on a speaker or headphone with a flat top-end.
post #254 of 562

 

Quote:
Okay, here's one from an earlier batch for further comparison.Comparison2.png

 

Good job.

post #255 of 562

Here is my graph (serial no. 05255, purchased November 2009 from Amazon USA), which looks nearly indistinguishable to me from all of the other graphs posted here in the 3000 to 7000 serial number range (at least).  I'm jealous of the flatter curves shown throughout most of the range in the earlier batches; but as others have pointed out, in the grand scheme of things, overall the (admittedly low-resolution) plot still is very flat indeed.  I'm pleased.

 

Individual Diffuse-Field Frequency Response chart of my pair of Sennheiser HD800 headphones.

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