New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Home-Made IEMs - Page 7

post #91 of 2215
Thread Starter 
diagram
http://www.ultimateears.it/pics_prod...expl_large.jpg

real pictures - 7th, 8th & 9th pictures down
http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...a%3DN%26um%3D1
post #92 of 2215
it's hard to see stuff in the real pictures...can't relaly tell can only see two drivers
post #93 of 2215
Awesome stuff, I look forward to the final result.
post #94 of 2215
Thread Starter 
I just got an e-mail from Tom Hazlett over at KA. I'd asked him about what drivers KA considered its top contenders as either woofers or tweeters. While suggesting that it's a "very subjective question," he said he's seen the TEC, CI and FK models used as woofers, the ED and FK models as tweeters, and combinations of TED + ED, CI + ED, CI + TWFK (triple) and TEC + TWFK (triple).

A couple of observations are in order. First, I think we've all seen the CI used as a woofer. That seems to be a no-brainer. Lots of pictures of customs, when blown up, show the CI on the outside, with its model number fairly visible. Second, it's interesting that the FK would be used as a woofer, in some designs, and as a tweeter in others. This is suggestive of the shapeshifting nature of BA's. There really aren't any obvious woofers or tweeters. It's what you do with these wide-range drivers that makes all the difference. Third, in dual-driver configurations, the ED may be a popular second driver, probably as a tweeter. Fourth, you'll notice that the TWFK is popular in triple-driver configurations. That's likely because the TWFK is a dual driver, the world's smallest.

When I piggy-backed my TWFK on my CI-22955, it was small enough to put the entire apparatus into a de-cored foamy. I was going to do this with the other driver when I had my soldering disaster. One thing I noticed was that there was ample room to piggy-back a second TWFK, to create a five-driver setup - and small enough to fit into (not onto) an eartip. With a 2.55mm minijack (let alone a two-prong wire connector), this would make for an amazing set of tiny shell-less earphones. Even without an "integrated passive crossover" or any filters to tweak the sound, I got amazing sound from my CI-22955 + TWFK combo. I found I had to position them right, to get a good seal, but once I did, it was an impressive combo.

Point of correction. I was able to wire up the CI-22955 for both ears (which worked wonderfully). I was not able to get the combo in the second ear because of the soldering disaster, forcing me to buy more drivers. What I did notice in the one ear (with the CI/TWFK combo) was a very cool, dynamic, sound.
post #95 of 2215
This is so cool. I'll let you guys deal with the complicated job of finding drivers etc.

But is it possible for me to start making my own molds and using the drivers inside a cheap pair of jvc marshmallows? Is acoustic tubing what is needed to direct the sound out of the earpiece?

Heh, Im more interested in making molds
post #96 of 2215
Thread Starter 
This could be the beginning of a beautiful friendship. I am not a moldsmith. If you can mold shells, I can wire them up, or at least design the configuration.

By the way, the sound tubes, which I got from Microsomic, are there to compensate for recessed drivers. There is truth to their use as a frequency tuner - longer and narrower lowers the high frequency while shorter and wider opens the high end -but they are not a necessity. The challenge with dynamic drivers is size.
post #97 of 2215
Me too, i'm more into making molds then the components themselves. Don't mistaken, i still love electronics i had to recable a Earsonics Sm2 last night, which i did. (Surprisingly, well not really the Woofer in the Sm2 is also the Knowles CI 22955 and the tweeter was i'm not sure what series but it was a Knowles 29689). What i am actually wanting to do is, find mold that will allow me to take apart my Sm2 and bind it together with another earphone for example a pair of dynamic or BA earphone just for fun.

Ahhh only if i had all the equipment...
post #98 of 2215
Thread Starter 
The tweeter was ED-29689, which sells for $24.49 through Mouser. That's a good price because Mouser will sell in single units. The price of the CI-22955 (through Mouser) is $26.19. So, not counting shipping, the price of the drivers for a pair of Sm2's is $101.36. The amount of wire used is nominal. The amount solder used is nominal. The cost for an SMD capacitor, especially the single-driver "crossovers" typically tied to a single tweeter, is also nominal (less than $5). The tubes, available from Microsonics, are a few bucks at the most. Once we figure out what filters sound best with these drivers, the cost of two pairs of acoustic dampers is approximately $6 (not counting shipping).

So think about this. The drivers on your SM2, which sells for 280 Euros (approximately $393) cost $101.36 - that is, if they were purchased retail. That's about a quarter of the price of an Sm2. Even when you include the other components - the little bit of wire, the few drops of solder, the few millimeters of sound tubing, the six dollars' worth of acoustic dampers, and the cabling - there's a lot of potential for building an Sm2 equivalent for a song and a dance. Right now, my weak link is the acrylic casting. I don't think injection molding is really needed for something whose per-unit value makes it unnecessary for an automated process capable of producing a huge batch of plastic housings. This can be done cheaper and with less efficiency - and still remain worth doing. But that's the process I'm trying to get a handle on now.
post #99 of 2215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilavideo View Post
The tweeter was ED-29689, which sells for $24.49 through Mouser. That's a good price because Mouser will sell in single units. The price of the CI-22955 (through Mouser) is $26.19. So, not counting shipping, the price of the drivers for a pair of Sm2's is $101.36. The amount of wire used is nominal. The amount solder used is nominal. The cost for an SMD capacitor, especially the single-driver "crossovers" typically tied to a single tweeter, is also nominal (less than $5). The tubes, available from Microsonics, are a few bucks at the most. Once we figure out what filters sound best with these drivers, the cost of two pairs of acoustic dampers is approximately $6 (not counting shipping).

So think about this. The drivers on your SM2, which sells for 280 Euros (approximately $393) cost $101.36 - that is, if they were purchased retail. That's about a quarter of the price of an Sm2. Even when you include the other components - the little bit of wire, the few drops of solder, the few millimeters of sound tubing, the six dollars' worth of acoustic dampers, and the cabling - there's a lot of potential for building an Sm2 equivalent for a song and a dance. Right now, my weak link is the acrylic casting. I don't think injection molding is really needed for something whose per-unit value makes it unnecessary for an automated process capable of producing a huge batch of plastic housings. This can be done cheaper and with less efficiency - and still remain worth doing. But that's the process I'm trying to get a handle on now.

Yes i know they are making a lot of profit, but you have to think that all products have to be shipped there, which you have to pay taxes for and shipping (shipping charges for things have gone out of the roof these couple months, pop...yes soda pop now cost $3 more for a pack of 12 here in Canada because of shipping fees. well anyways, going on even if it was $100 to make, i would've expected that already. But they still have to pay for taxes, labour, and make profit right? So i don't blame them.

I would think the biggest problem, like you said would be to find a proper housing for everything. Getting something personally made, high quality but not in large quantities.
post #100 of 2215
What i want to see is the insides of the Shure Se line...
post #101 of 2215
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaoDi View Post
What i want to see is the insides of the Shure Se line...
Scroll down past the pretty girl (easier said than done):

Google Image Result for http://lib.store.yahoo.net/lib/yhst-94024159501758/1se530blow.jpg
post #102 of 2215
Quote:
But that's the process I'm trying to get a handle on now.
Have you considered any type of vacuum molding?
By this I mean placing the mold in a vacuum and drawing the plastic into it from outside the vacuum. It is fairly straightforward.
post #103 of 2215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilavideo View Post
IN MEMORIAM

Funeral services will be held today for two drivers who were killed in unrelated soldering accidents. CI-22955, $26, and TWFK, $52, both received fatal wounds after head-on collisions with Bill's bad soldering. Investigators on the scene have listed contributing causes to be the underwhelming magnification on Bill's hands-free and the enormity of Bil''s hot tip (Ladies, be warned). When the driver terminals slipped off, snapping tiny leads, the CI-22955 was rushed to surgery where its torso was opened up with a flat-head screwdriver for what turned into an impromptu anatomy lesson. Despite repeated attempts to revive him, CI-22955 died on the table. No attempt was made to save the even smaller TWFK, which frankly had it coming.

CI-22955 and TWFK are survived by their twins which, while meeting separately, married and live happily together within the left foamy tip of Bill's prototype. Their success together, as possibly the world's smallest three-way unit (the tip is the shell) can best be expressed in the maxim: If this tip's a rockin' don't come a knockin'.

In the aftermath of this terrible tragedy, Bill has ordered replacement drivers and has purchased a better soldering station and a larger magnification for his hands-free. Friends, don't let friends squint and solder.
These words do not satisfy Authorities, we will investigate further and probably do authopsies to verify, please don't leave the city....
post #104 of 2215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billyk View Post
Have you considered any type of vacuum molding?
By this I mean placing the mold in a vacuum and drawing the plastic into it from outside the vacuum. It is fairly straightforward.
Vacuum molding is indeed a god send in many situations!
And, it can be done relatively cheap with a shop-vac, some scrap wood, and plastic+mold
post #105 of 2215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilavideo View Post
Thanks for that, But i meant real life pictures. Where you can clearly see what drivers they use and how they wired it up. The WHOLE Se line...minus the Se115 as i'm not interested in the Dynamic Driver...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home