Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Dedicated Source Components › Cambridge DACMagic, anyone? (THREAD II)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cambridge DACMagic, anyone? (THREAD II) - Page 2

post #16 of 642
This thread is a perfect example of why Cambridge's choice to include 3 filters was the right one. Not only do we see individual preferences for all 3 types, but also specific dislikes for the ones that other people like!

Incidentally, the manual is pretty thorough in explaining the differences amongst them.
post #17 of 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by thathertz View Post
It's probably due to be announced seeing as I've just paid the cost of the
DacMagic again in modifications (by Audiocom)

Is that the modification that was being offered on eBay for practically the same cost as the unit itself? (can't see it advertised any more). They were getting alot of questions from people who thought they were selling the entire unit...

Anyway, I will be interested to hear what you think of it. Personally, my feeling is that rather than pay for such an expensive modification (that you actually can't even pre-audition), I would much rather buy something higher in quality to begin with.
post #18 of 642
I plan on getting this DAC soon MBP > Optical Out > Dacmagic > Audioengine A5.

Does anybody have that setup?
post #19 of 642
kind of blows that price of this dac keeps going up. You'd figured they sold enough to be able to turn a profit at it's original price. I may just pick this up soon. I'm in no hurry, but I can't ignore all the praise it gets (here and everywhere else).
post #20 of 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by endless402 View Post
...

Linear: crisp sound. good timing. reminds me of my cd player
Min: wider soundstage, little bit looser timing (not as crisp), slightly warmer

...
Quote:
Originally Posted by jilgiljongiljing View Post
...

Linear - You gain soundstage and overall presence and warmth, you lose a bit of detail and snap
Minimum - Sounds more detailed, snappier, quicker and responsive, but soundstage isnt as wide and overall warmth is lacking

...
Did someone say something about hearing being a subjective thing?

I haven't been doing much comparison myself, but from my few A-B (and C) tests I've come to the conclusion that I can hear so little difference between the filters that I may just be imagining those miniscule differences, so I've just been using minimum most of the time, as that seemed to be the most common recommendation in part 1 of this thread.
Then again, my capacity for hearing fine details really seems to fall far behind that of many people around here, as also the differences between the built in DAC in my PS3 (which seems to have a bad reputation, and it was coupled with a cheap RCA cable to my amp) and the DacMagic (with fairly decent optical and RCA cables) really do seem to be in those very fine details, and for the most part really require pretty attentive listening to notice.

As I do find myself listening to music in that fashion much more frequently lately I don't consider the DAC a wasted purchase though, and I think I better do another round of those filter comparisons, as depending on which of the quoted descriptions above I might end up agreeing with , it sounds like linear could be a better choice for the music genres I usually listen to.
post #21 of 642
Out of the blue, does anyone have a spare vertical stand they can sell me? I bought a used one off the forums, seller didn't give me one and it was somehow thrown out
post #22 of 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by jilgiljongiljing View Post
Based on my experience, not sure if I stated the same thing earlier or something different, but right now I will say

Linear Filter - Classical, Jazz, Soft rock, Ambient, Mellow laid back music
Minimum - Metal, Hard Rock and everything else which is fast, quick and has snap.

What you lose with either

Linear - You gain soundstage and overall presence and warmth, you lose a bit of detail and snap
Minimum - Sounds more detailed, snappier, quicker and responsive, but soundstage isnt as wide and overall warmth is lacking

Steep - Meh, I couldnt quite get the point of this setting, I tried hard to figure out what its supposed to do, but to me I am not able to pin point any obvious differences. But one thing though, call me biased or whatever, I've never been able to stay on this setting for long, I always switch back to the other two.
Those are exactly my impressions! Minimum is snappier, linear is mellower. Steep remains a mystery to me. But I must admit that I don't really care for the difference.
post #23 of 642
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADD View Post
Is that the modification that was being offered on eBay for practically the same cost as the unit itself? (can't see it advertised any more). They were getting alot of questions from people who thought they were selling the entire unit...

Anyway, I will be interested to hear what you think of it. Personally, my feeling is that rather than pay for such an expensive modification (that you actually can't even pre-audition), I would much rather buy something higher in quality to begin with.
Yes, they do offer the mods on Ebay.

I've spoken to a couple of people who have had the mods done and they're
very happy with the result. Sure, it's alot of money but the step up to
the next level (for me) is alot more.

I'll let you know how it sounds when it arrives.
post #24 of 642
So has anyone tried both balanced and unbalanced outs? Performance?
post #25 of 642
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADD View Post
Is that the modification that was being offered on eBay for practically the same cost as the unit itself? (can't see it advertised any more). They were getting alot of questions from people who thought they were selling the entire unit...

Anyway, I will be interested to hear what you think of it. Personally, my feeling is that rather than pay for such an expensive modification (that you actually can't even pre-audition), I would much rather buy something higher in quality to begin with.
** UPDATE **

I get my DacMagic back tomorrow.
No mods have been made by Audiocom.

I had to call to find out what was going on and I was told that one
of the main screws behind the faceplate was shredded. This is strange
because my Dacmagic was purchased new from the only UK dealer
(Richer Sounds). Audiocom suggested that someone had attempted
to open the unit in the past.

So...the mods cannot be carried out and my warranty is presumably
screwed (pun intended) even though the internals are unchanged.

Audiocom have tried to find a way around this problem but in the
end I'm left with paying £20.00 (AFAIK) to get the exact same unit back.

Have to say though, I'm really looking forward to getting her back

That's all folks.

Mike
post #26 of 642
I have just opened the supply to find out some plastic in the inside had broken. Something was being heard on the inside rolling up and down when I leaned the supply, luckily it was just couple pieces of plastic. One screw doesn't not hold anymore though.
post #27 of 642
Thread Starter 
Any DIY'ers out there that would have a clue how to get this
shredded screw out?

I haven't seen the internals so I don't know how bad the problem is.

Help appreciated.

Cheers
Mike
post #28 of 642
Thread Starter 
* Somehwat unrelated *

Aaron (immtbiker) is on the case fixing the first Dacmagic thread and
linking it to this, the part II thread.

Just FYI.

Cheers M'dears.

Mike
post #29 of 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by thathertz View Post
** UPDATE **

I get my DacMagic back tomorrow.
No mods have been made by Audiocom.

I had to call to find out what was going on and I was told that one
of the main screws behind the faceplate was shredded. This is strange
because my Dacmagic was purchased new from the only UK dealer
(Richer Sounds). Audiocom suggested that someone had attempted
to open the unit in the past. Unless this happened during initial manufacture
this is just not possible.

Hi Mike,

Sorry to hear of this, but I am curious as to whether Audiocom actually opened the unit to make this diagnosis, or whether they decided this was the case based on external inspection only?

I ask because you might be interested in my own experience. As some might know, I am already onto my second DACMagic. The first died around 36 hours into use, developing an internal noise that sounded like a large gas-fired fireplace. It got worse and worse to the point where I was asked by the dealer to immediately desist from using the unit and to return it for exchange.

The seller replaced it with a brand new one since the original was determined to be DOA. When I received the second one, I did not closely inspect the build quality as I was more interested in getting a unit that functioned flawlessly. I had the second unit burning in for nearly a week (no gas noises thus far).

After a week, I went to lift the unit and move it into the bedroom. I noticed upon lifting the unit that it made a sort of creaking noise, as if it had not been perfectly screwed together.

Upon very close inspection of the unit and packaging, I happily convinced myself the replacement unit really was new (it was obviously new, even right down to the smell lol, and the dealer is very ethical about these things). But what I also noticed was that the front panel did not align itself correctly with the fascia of the metal body. What I mean by that is there was a small air gap between the alunimium fasia and the body at the point where there is a self tapping retaining screw (this is the screw people talk about when they mention needing a very long screwdriver to dismantle the DACMagic).

Anyway, after looking at it externally with a torch and magnifying glass, I actually came to the same conclusion that your Audiocom friends did - that this front panel self tapper had sheared, and this was why the front panel was not perfectly flush against the main body. I even "verifed" this by gently pushing the front panel against the body, whilst observing the screw not to move either (which either meant the screw was not done up at all, or had indeed sheared.

I was obviously reluctant to send yet another DACMagic back to the seller, plus I was worried I might get accused of tampering with it. But since I also realised that I could open the unit without leaving any telltale signs of having done so, I decided to purchase a long screwdriver to see exactly what the problem was with front panel retaining screw (so I actually only needed to remove the back panel in any case).

After taking off the back panel and inserting the newly purchased 20cm Philips, I was mightily relieved to discover that the screw actually had not sheared at all - it simply had not been done up properly. After carefully positioning the front panel and carefully torquing up the offending screw, all was well again.

Sure, I could have just returned the unit, but it would have lost it for a few weeks and it would have cost me $20 to send it back. And in the end, they would have done exactly what I did. So, I think there is a possibility that the problem with your unit is the problem I had with mine, unless they are talking about a different screw.

Anyway, I have to say that I continue to be unimpressed by Cambridge's quality control. I have had two units - one with an electromechanical flaw, one with a constructional flaw, plus I now read about yours and now another post here about the power supply. I can't help thinking that Cambridge are trying to pack so much into this wonderful sounding device for the money, that corners are being cut - in the design (it is barely any more sturdy than a mass market Chinese digital set top TV box imho - don't let the nice front panel fool you), the materials used for construction, and seemingly at the factory where they are put together.

What I would advise people to do is to lift and handle these units carefully. Always lift them with both hands and hold as much surface area of the unit as possible from underneath. Do not concentrate any pressure on the front panel itself, as there is already too much tension on the panel mounting to begin with imo. Had I engineered the casing of this unit, I would have used at least three screws on the front panel - not just one. And I would have used a larger gauge of screw everywhere. It is rather ironic that given the cheap construction in some places and the painfully thin metal casing, the back panel is held very well in place by six properly threaded screws (though still too narrow a gauge). Maybe Tom engineered the back, Dick engineered the front and Harry engineered the guts of it...
post #30 of 642
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADD View Post
Hi Mike,

Sorry to hear of this, but I am curious as to whether Audiocom actually opened the unit to make this diagnosis, or whether they decided this was the case based on external inspection only?........snip ...
Interesting. I can never remember seeing anything like this with a new
unit mass produced in this way. It seems I may have been wrong in
my suggestion. Audiocom were never able to open the unit and in the end
we decided the best option was just to abandon the mods and send it back.

I need to see if I can source a long handled screw extractor if there is
such a thing.

Thanks for relaying your experiences and I'm glad you have a stable,
working unit now
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Dedicated Source Components
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Dedicated Source Components › Cambridge DACMagic, anyone? (THREAD II)