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HAHAHAHAHA Death to antipiracy CDs

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Read on :

Imbruglia Imbroglio

By Jon Iverson



November 26, 2001 — Record label attempts at restricting the potential uses of their CDs have hit another bump in the antipiracy road. Music label BMG had announced earlier this year that it would try to find ways to restrict its CDs, in an effort to stem piracy and the trading of MP3 files. But those plans appear to have backfired, so far.
BMG found itself in hot water again last week as European consumers began to return "defective" copies of the company's release of Natalie Imbruglia's White Lilies Island, which had been treated with a restriction technology from Midbar Tech called Cactus Data Shield. BMG has had other problems with Midbar's technology, dating back to early 2000 when the company was forced to recall thousands of discs in Germany.

As reported on Fat Chuck's Corrupt CDs website, the new disc exhibited inconsistent behavior when tested in a variety of CD/DVD environments. For example, playback was unencumbered on an Apple iBook running OS 9, but not using OSX, where the first track was unplayable. Digitally burning to a MiniDisc is said to be out of the question, and the disc reportedly hiccups in a variety of older consumer CD and DVD machines.

BMG's Regine Hoffman tried to downplay the incident: "As we start working with these new technologies, some of these issues can arise when things go into broad circulation. Certain limitations of the protection technology were unforeseeable and only emerged when the CDs were released to the general public."

Hoffman says BMG will replace any problematic discs with unrestricted versions and has set up a special phone number for European customers who wish to exchange their discs. She adds that this latest misstep will not deter the company from encoding future releases, stating, "The testing phase is proceeding in a way that we want to pursue it."

Music shops say they are sensitive to the public's concerns with restricted discs, especially as sales continue to slow. Retailer Virgin has sent out emails to unhappy White Lilies Island purchasers stating that "BMG only informed us on 14 November 2001 that all European stock of Natalie's CD is protected by the Cactus Data Shield. Unfortunately, this stock has not been stickered to notify our customers of this encoding, and needless to say we are very disappointed that this has happened. As retailers, we do support the fight against copyright theft; however, this should never be at the expense of the customer."

But in the final analysis, did the restriction technology prevent the Imbruglia CD from being pirated? One online posting reads: "Needless to say, it's been ripped and copies are already up on file-swap sites, and in fact were there before the album was officially launched."

Related links :

http://www.stereophile.com/shownews.cgi?671
http://www.fatchucks.com/corruptcds/index.html
post #2 of 25
There should be a law stating that a sticker or notice must be placed on every protected CD, in the event it gets screwy with your CDP, people will know what the cause is.

See how many CDs they'll get out the door then...that'd kill this whole copyrighting crap entirely.
post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
You are 100% right! I wish there were a law that forced them to label these CDs.
post #4 of 25
Serves them right, getting screwed like that for trying to screw us!

Besides, all you need is an A/D convertor and you can make your digital copies, pathetically easy
post #5 of 25
I don't know about a law that requires labels to state if a CD is "protected". That kind of reminds me of parental advisory labels.

It's truly pathetic and paranoid what these labels are doing though. They will never be able to stop people from copying disks for personal use. It's perfectly legal.

I will exercise my will and never buy "protected" CDs. But you can send me yours and I will use them for skeet shooting. Send a tape and I will film it too.
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by BenG
I don't know about a law that requires labels to state if a CD is "protected". That kind of reminds me of parental advisory labels.
Hardly. These CD's have been tampered with. They are technically pushing the definition of a redbook CD. CD's are expected to work properly.

I heartily endorse a law against this, or at least of a stickering nature.

'at's-a too bad, I kinda like Natalie, in a Garbage/Curve/Lennon/Chainsuck kind of way. I would be curious if the domestic (I.E. US, I.E. domestic to me) release of this contains the same defects...much less if there is a domestic release...
post #7 of 25
I also like her a lot. I bought "Woah Nelly!" about a year or so ago (right when it came out) and loved it -- we even saw her in concert here in SF. But I won't buy the new album unless they get rid of the copy-protection stuff. Mainly because of the reports that it doesn't work right with a lot of CD players.
post #8 of 25
" These CD's have been tampered with. They are technically pushing the definition of a redbook CD. CD's are expected to work properly. "

Is the "Redbook" really law? I though it is a private agreement between the record labels and electronic manufactors?

If it's a private agreement then it would indeed be like requiring parental advisory stickers.
post #9 of 25
I think of it as an inherent contract between the manufacturers (the entire line, from musician, to pressing plant) and the consumer. When you are buying a music CD, and it does not say otherwise, you are expecting it to follow the Redbook standard, no? If you bought a music CD (and you didn't have the ability to "play" it on a computer), and it was all CD-ROM, wouldn't you return it, saying "this is not what I expected it to be"?
post #10 of 25
Quote:
I also like her a lot. I bought "Woah Nelly!" about a year or so ago (right when it came out) and loved it -- we even saw her in concert here in SF. But I won't buy the new album unless they get rid of the copy-protection stuff. Mainly because of the reports that it doesn't work right with a lot of CD players.
hey...

whoa nelly is by Nelly Furtado, while the thread is about Natalie Imbruglia...

Ones from Canada, one's from austrailia, and we're not the same place!
post #11 of 25
OMG! LOL! I totally misread the first thread -- I though we were talking about NF! OK, ignore my post completely. I would delete it, but then thomas would look silly
post #12 of 25
Quote:
you are expecting it to follow the Redbook standard, no? If you bought a music CD (and you didn't have the ability to "play" it on a computer), and it was all CD-ROM, wouldn't you return it, saying "this is not what I expected it to be"?
That's ridiculous. I won't buy any CDs which cannot be palyed on my laptop. But they are fighting a losing battle anyway.
post #13 of 25
I agree with everyone here...of course

If i buy any of these cds that are "protected" and can't copy them to my MD or make a mix from it via my PC, its getting returned and i will hunt down the vinyl version if its available. This is BS, the record industry will do anything to screw the consumer over. BASTARDS!

George
post #14 of 25
Unfortuntely, this copy protection BS is comeing. The greed of the record companies is exceeded only by Enron's management.

One can only hope they go the same way.

In a way I'm kind of lucky when it comes to this issue. There's a hell of a lot of jazz/blues/classical on the audiophile niche market labels.

Acoustic Sounds/Blue Heaven Studios in Kansas and Mapleshade Records in Maryland are 2 fairly new companies putting out some quality stuff.

Then there's Chesky. One of the great reissuers of audiophile editions.

I'm sure there are others also, but these are the ones that come to mind.

Maybe some of these labels will start carrying more of the mainstream stuff. I wouldn't hold my breath.

I know that I'll never knowingly buy a protected disc. The PTB's in the record industry have already admitted a degradation of sound quality, but it's no big deal because "Nobody cares about sound quality anymore."

Totally sucks, but the only thing we can do is vote with our wallets. Don't buy the damn things....

Off my soap box!!!

post #15 of 25
Thread Starter 
I would never buy them knowning that their were copy protected, but how are we as music fans suppose to know that ahead of time?
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